Robert B. McAfee

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Robert B. McAfee
A man with dark hair and a prominent nose and ears wearing a white shirt and black jacket
5th United States Ambassador to Colombia
In office
July 1, 1833 – June 20, 1837
PresidentAndrew Jackson
Preceded byThomas Patrick Moore
Succeeded byJames Semple
7th Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
In office
August 24, 1824 – August 26, 1828
GovernorJoseph Desha
Preceded byWilliam T. Barry
Succeeded byJohn Breathitt
Personal details
BornFebruary 18, 1784
Mercer County, Kentucky
DiedMarch 12, 1849(1849-03-12) (aged 65)
Salt River, Kentucky
Political partyDemocratic-Republican
Military service
AllegianceUnited States of America
Service/branchUnited States Army
RankGeneral
Battles/warsWar of 1812
 
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Robert B. McAfee
A man with dark hair and a prominent nose and ears wearing a white shirt and black jacket
5th United States Ambassador to Colombia
In office
July 1, 1833 – June 20, 1837
PresidentAndrew Jackson
Preceded byThomas Patrick Moore
Succeeded byJames Semple
7th Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
In office
August 24, 1824 – August 26, 1828
GovernorJoseph Desha
Preceded byWilliam T. Barry
Succeeded byJohn Breathitt
Personal details
BornFebruary 18, 1784
Mercer County, Kentucky
DiedMarch 12, 1849(1849-03-12) (aged 65)
Salt River, Kentucky
Political partyDemocratic-Republican
Military service
AllegianceUnited States of America
Service/branchUnited States Army
RankGeneral
Battles/warsWar of 1812

Robert Breckinridge McAfee (February 18, 1784 – March 12, 1849) was a Kentucky politician, and was the seventh Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky serving from 1824 to 1828.

McAfee was born on February 18, 1784 in Mercer County, Kentucky, and was orphaned in 1795 after his father was killed in New Orleans, Louisiana. McAfee was made a General in the United States Army during the War of 1812 and commanded a troop raised by order of Gen. Andrew Jackson, that took part in the Battle of New Orleans.

Following his military service, he lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and entered state politics. He was a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives prior to 1824, when he was elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky. He cast a tie-breaking vote that prevented the abolition of the "New Court" during the Old Court-New Court controversy in 1825. President Andrew Jackson then named him Chargé d'affaires to New Granada, which he served from 1833 to 1837.

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Political offices
Preceded by
William T. Barry
Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
1824–1828
Succeeded by
John Breathitt
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Thomas P. Moore
United States Chargé d'affaires, New Granada
1 July 1833–20 June 1837
Succeeded by
James Semple