Richterite

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Richterite
Richterite-mrz156a.jpg
Richterite. Wilberforce, Monmouth Township, Haliburton County, Ontario, Canada.
General
CategoryInosilicates
Formula
(repeating unit)
Na(Ca, Na)Mg5Si8O22(OH)2
Strunz classification09.DE.20
Identification
ColorBrown, yellow, red, or green
Crystal habitPrismatic
Crystal systemMonoclinic
CleavagePerfect
FractureUneven, brittle
Mohs scale hardness5-6
LusterVitreous
StreakPale yellow
DiaphaneityTransparent to translucent
Specific gravity3.0-3.5
 
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Richterite
Richterite-mrz156a.jpg
Richterite. Wilberforce, Monmouth Township, Haliburton County, Ontario, Canada.
General
CategoryInosilicates
Formula
(repeating unit)
Na(Ca, Na)Mg5Si8O22(OH)2
Strunz classification09.DE.20
Identification
ColorBrown, yellow, red, or green
Crystal habitPrismatic
Crystal systemMonoclinic
CleavagePerfect
FractureUneven, brittle
Mohs scale hardness5-6
LusterVitreous
StreakPale yellow
DiaphaneityTransparent to translucent
Specific gravity3.0-3.5

Richterite is a sodium calcium magnesium silicate mineral belonging to the amphibole group. If iron replaces the magnesium within the structure of the mineral, it is called ferrorichterite; if fluorine replaces the hydroxyl, it is called fluororichterite. Richterite crystals are long and prismatic, or prismatic to fibrous aggregates, or rock-bound crystals. Colors of richterite range from brown, grayish-brown, yellow, brownish- to rose-red, or pale to dark green. Richterite occurs in thermally metamorphosed limestones in contact metamorphic zones. It also occurs as a hydrothermal product in mafic igneous rocks, and in manganese-rish ore deposits. Localities include Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, and Wilberforce and Tory Hill, Ontario, Canada; Långban and Pajsberg, Sweden; West Kimberley, Western Australia; Sanka, Myanmar; and, in the US, at Iron Hill, Colorado; Leucite Hills, Wyoming; and Libby, Montana. The mineral was named in 1865 for the German mineralogist Theodore Richter (1824–1898).

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