Richard Lucian Page

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Richard Lucian Page
RLPage.jpg
Richard Lucian Page
BornDecember 20, 1807 (1807-12-20)
Clarke County, Virginia
DiedAugust 9, 1901 (1901-08-10) (aged 93)
Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania
Buried atCedar Hill Cemetery, Norfolk
Virginia
Allegiance United States of America
 Confederate States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
 Confederate States Navy
 Confederate States Army
Years of service1824–1861 (USN)
1861–1864 (CSN)
1864 (CSA)
RankUSN com rank insignia.jpg Commander (USN)
Csn strap capt.png Captain (CSN)
Confederate States of America General.png Brigadier General (CSA)
Battles/wars

American Civil War

 
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Richard Lucian Page
RLPage.jpg
Richard Lucian Page
BornDecember 20, 1807 (1807-12-20)
Clarke County, Virginia
DiedAugust 9, 1901 (1901-08-10) (aged 93)
Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania
Buried atCedar Hill Cemetery, Norfolk
Virginia
Allegiance United States of America
 Confederate States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
 Confederate States Navy
 Confederate States Army
Years of service1824–1861 (USN)
1861–1864 (CSN)
1864 (CSA)
RankUSN com rank insignia.jpg Commander (USN)
Csn strap capt.png Captain (CSN)
Confederate States of America General.png Brigadier General (CSA)
Battles/wars

American Civil War

Richard Lucian Page (December 20, 1807 – August 9, 1901) was a United States Navy officer who joined the Confederate States Navy and later became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was a cousin of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Another cousin was poet Thomas Nelson Page.

Biography[edit]

Page was born in Clarke County, Virginia. Page joined the US Navy as a midshipman March 12, 1824. During the American Civil War, Page served as a Naval aide to the Governor of Virginia John Letcher in 1861. Page was in command of the garrison that controlled Fort Morgan, Alabama during the Union's attack on Mobile Bay. Fort Morgan withheld the Union attack on April 5, 1864, but was besieged on April 9. Federal troops moved works closer to the outdated fort for the next two weeks. When Union fire threatened to ignite the Confederate powder magazine, the defenders put the kegs in the cisterns. On August 23 General Page unconditionally surrendered the fort, because his troops had little usable gunpowder. Indignant, he broke his sword over his knee instead of surrendering his sword to the Federals. Page's situation was further worsened when he was suspected of destroying munitions and works within the fort after he had agreed to surrender. For this he was arrested by the Federal authorities and imprisoned once he personally surrendered. He died in Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania, and is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia.

Namesake[edit]

The USS Richard L. Page (DEG-5/FFG-5), a Brooke class frigate in the United States Navy built in 1965, was named in his honor.

References[edit]

External links[edit]