Richard Grenell

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Richard Grenell
CitizenshipUnited States
OccupationSpeechwriter, Lobbyist
ReligionChristian
 
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Richard Grenell
CitizenshipUnited States
OccupationSpeechwriter, Lobbyist
ReligionChristian

Richard Grenell (born September 18, 1966) is an American political consultant and media commentator who briefly served as national security spokesman for Mitt Romney in his campaign for president of the United States.[1] In April 2012 he became the first openly gay spokesman for a Republican presidential candidate, after being hired by Mitt Romney.[2] Less than one week later, on May 1, he resigned after pressure from social conservatives led by Bryan Fischer.[3]

Career[edit]

In 2001 Grenell was appointed by President George W. Bush to serve as director of communications and public diplomacy for the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations. In 2009 Grenell launched Capitol Media Partners, an international strategic media and public affairs consultancy.[4] Media have reported that prior to his post with the United Nations, he was a political adviser to major Republican figures, including George Pataki and Dave Camp.[5]

In 2013 Grenell was a signatory to an amicus curiae brief submitted to the Supreme Court in support of same-sex marriage during the Hollingsworth v. Perry case.[6]

Personal[edit]

Richard Grenell lives in California with his partner of nine years, Matthew Lashey, a media and entertainment company executive.[7] He is a registered Republican.[7] Grenell received a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and his bachelor's degree in Government and Public Administration from Evangel College.[citation needed] In June 2013, Grenell revealed that he has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and recently started chemotherapy.[8] In September 2013, Grenell announced that he had been declared in remission and was cancer free.[9]

References[edit]