Remington 788

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Remington 788
Remington 788.jpg
Remington 788
TypeRifle
Place of origin United States
Production history
DesignerWayne Leek
ManufacturerRemington Arms
Produced1967 to 1983
Number builtapprox 565,000
VariantsLeft-hand in 6mm Remington and .308 Win.
Specifications
Cartridge.222 Remington

.223 Remington
.22-250 Remington
.243 Winchester
6mm Remington
7mm-08 Remington
.308 Winchester
.30-30 Winchester
.44 Remington Magnum

ActionBolt-action repeater
Feed system3-rd, single-column box magazine
 
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Remington 788
Remington 788.jpg
Remington 788
TypeRifle
Place of origin United States
Production history
DesignerWayne Leek
ManufacturerRemington Arms
Produced1967 to 1983
Number builtapprox 565,000
VariantsLeft-hand in 6mm Remington and .308 Win.
Specifications
Cartridge.222 Remington

.223 Remington
.22-250 Remington
.243 Winchester
6mm Remington
7mm-08 Remington
.308 Winchester
.30-30 Winchester
.44 Remington Magnum

ActionBolt-action repeater
Feed system3-rd, single-column box magazine

The Remington 788 is an inexpensive yet accurate hunting rifle developed by the Remington Arms Company to compete with other gun companies' less expensive rifles and marketed alongside their more expensive Model 700 line. The 788 utilizes a single-column detachable magazine holding 3 rounds. A .22 rimfire model was also produced known as the 580, 581, or 582 depending on its method of feed. A target version of the .22 caliber 58x series, the 540X, was used by the US Military[1] as a training rifle and later disposed through the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

Overview

The distinguishing feature of the 788 is its rear-lugged bolt. The bolt has 9 lugs in three rows of three lugs each. They lock into the receiver behind the magazine well. Because of this design, the bolt handle lifts only 60 degrees on opening giving more clearance for scopes compared to the 90 degrees required for the Model 700 and other two-lugged bolts. The bolt travel is also reduced because of the rear lugs. The receiver also has a small ejection port and no bolt lug raceways, making the receiver stiffer than a Remington 700, although it is the same outside diameter.

The 788 was made in many calibers up to the length of the 6 mm Remington. Magazines in this caliber are extremely rare. Most common calibers encountered are .308 and .243, but less common bolt-action calibers are available such as .222 .30-30 Winchester and .44 magnum.[2] These rifles differed slightly in the design of the magazine and the bolt. The front of these bolts did not rotate.

Remington made extensive use of 'screw-machines' in the manufacture of this rifle. The 788 was discontinued in the 1980s. In its used form, the 788 retains a cult following for its accuracy, despite several serious design flaws. Such as the safety, it is notorious for slipping up and making the firearm unfit for safe use. Because this rifle is no longer in production, replacement parts are expensive and difficult to find. The Remington 700 is still in production and is used (with variants) as a military sniper rifle. [3][4][5] [6]

See also

References

  1. ^ American Rifleman magazine, may 1976, pp 42
  2. ^ Remington Model History
  3. ^ http://www.snipercountry.com/HotTips/Remington788.htm Sniper Country article
  4. ^ Field & Stream article
  5. ^ Gunsmithing the model 788 Remington by William Schumaker, Shooting Industry, May 1990
  6. ^ Notes on the Remington 788 by Ken Marsh