Reed Cowan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Reed Cowan
BornDarrin Reed Cowan
(1972-07-24) July 24, 1972 (age 41)
Roosevelt, Utah, U.S.
ResidenceLas Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Alma materUtah State University
OccupationJournalist
Years active1996–present
TelevisionKSNV-DT (2011–present)
WSVN (2007–2011)
KTVX (2000–2007)
KSL-TV (1999–2000)
KBAK-TV (1997–1999)
WWTV (1996–1997)
ReligionThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon)
Spouse(s)Stephanie Swain Martinsen (divorced)
ChildrenWesley (2002–2006)
Website
Official website
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Reed Cowan
BornDarrin Reed Cowan
(1972-07-24) July 24, 1972 (age 41)
Roosevelt, Utah, U.S.
ResidenceLas Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Alma materUtah State University
OccupationJournalist
Years active1996–present
TelevisionKSNV-DT (2011–present)
WSVN (2007–2011)
KTVX (2000–2007)
KSL-TV (1999–2000)
KBAK-TV (1997–1999)
WWTV (1996–1997)
ReligionThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon)
Spouse(s)Stephanie Swain Martinsen (divorced)
ChildrenWesley (2002–2006)
Website
Official website

Darrin Reed Cowan (born July 24, 1972) is an American journalist. He was a documentary filmmaker, screenwriter, philanthropist, Emmy Award winner and three time Emmy Award nominee.[1][2][3][4]

Career[edit]

Cowan started his journalism working as a part-time on-air reporter for Fox's KSTU in Salt Lake City, Utah and as a radio disc-jockey for KNEU Radio in Roosevelt, Utah while a student at Utah State University. From there he assumed full time positions as an anchor for CBS 29 in Bakersfield, California and as an anchor for 9&10 News in Cadillac, Michigan. Cowan next worked as a reporter and weekend morning anchor for KSL-TV in Salt Lake City.

After KSL-TV, Cowan moved to KTVX, also in Salt Lake City. While there, he anchored Good Morning Utah[5] and covered the terrorist attacks of 9-11, the kidnapping of Elizabeth Smart, the murder of Lori Hacking, the death of former President Ronald Reagan and the fugitive stories of polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs. For his work, Cowan was nominated and for and won Emmy awards for reporting.[1][2][3][4]

In 2005, country music artist Collin Raye recorded Cowan's song The Power in You in Nashville. Cowan wrote the song to be a theme song for the "Power in You" organization, created by Mary Kaye Huntsman. Huntsman is the wife of former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman, Jr.

In 2007, Cowan moved from Salt Lake City to Miami and worked for WSVN, after seven years of journalism in Salt Lake City.

In 2011, Cowan moved from Miami to Las Vegas and is currently working for KSNV-DT, after four years of journalism in Miami.

Controversy[edit]

Cowan made controversial claims accusing Northern Nevada (including Carson City, Reno and Sparks) of engaging in a civil war with Southern Nevada and wasting taxpayers' money and controversially siding with former Clark County Commissioner Rory Reid 5 times.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Personal tragedy[edit]

On April 23, 2006, Cowan's son, Wesley Swain Cowan (March 16, 2002 – April 23, 2006), died in Salt Lake City, Utah, at his mother's back yard after falling from a horizontal set of monkey bars, at the age of 4.[7][8][9][10] Cowan, who is divorced from his son's mother, arrived on-scene moments after emergency crews arrived to find TV cameras focused on his own personal tragedy.[11] The event made national news and Cowan granted his first interview on the tragedy speaking about his experience of being "on the other side of the lens".[12]

Cowan responded to his son's death by reevaluating his life and dedicating himself to helping others in order to honor the memory of his son.[8] He addressed his personal tragedy and his subsequent efforts to build schools in Kenya during that country's post-election violence of 2007 in his documentary, The Other Side of the Lens.[11][13]

Activism and charitable activity[edit]

One year after his son's death, Cowan traveled to Africa to open two Wesley Cowan schools in Africa's Masai Mara. Shortly after his loss, Cowan started The Wesley Smiles Coalition[9][11][13][14] to work in tandem with Free the Children, started by Craig Kielburger. After raising substantial monies for the projects in Africa in the first year after his son's death, Cowan opened schools, water treatment facilities, mobile-medical clinics and other community infrastructure along Enelerai road in Kenya and in Kenya's Motoni district.[11][13] Cowan's journey to Africa was chronicled by the Deseret News in Salt Lake City where he told reporters, "I will raise at least one school a year in my son's name until the day I die."[9]

Cowan is on the advisory board for Free The Children and is producer of the youth organization Power In You.[15][16] Cowan drafted the first legislation in Utah aimed at the stopping of bullying in school. The resolution passed unanimously in Utah's House and Senate.[17]

Cowan drafted the first legislation in Utah specifically aimed at curbing bullying in school.[18] Sponsored in the Utah house by Representative Ronda Menlove and in the Utah Senate by Senator Patrice M. Arent, the resolution against bullying, harassment and intimidation in schools was the first of its kind and called for a formal reporting system and cohesive school-to-school response in instances of school bullying.[19] The resolution passed unanimously in Utah's House and Senate.[17][19] At hearings testifying in favor of the resolution, Cowan told of his own years of being picked on in school, saying "lets send a message to Utah kids that we care about their safety and happiness at school."[19]

Motivational speaker[edit]

Cowan is a speaker on the subject of bullying in school.[20] Each year, Cowan speaks to at least thirty thousand youth about school bullying and its ties to school violence and suicide.[21] In 2006, Cowan was featured as the keynote speaker at the National Youth Crime Prevention seminar.[22]

Books[edit]

In 2005, Cowan signed a publishing deal with Mapletree Publishing to publish his first book Afraid at School. This book provides the narratives of hundreds of school-age youth in expose format telling what happens at school relative to one of Cowan's pet causes, the eradication of school bullying.[23]

Triathlete[edit]

Cowan was also a triathlete. In 2011, he placed first in his division at the Nautica Southbeach Triathlon in Miami, Florida.[24]

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Rocky Mountain Emmy Award Winners". Phoenix Woman. Nov/Dec 08. Retrieved 2009-11-01.  [dead link]
  2. ^ a b c "2008 Suncoast Regional Emmy Awards Broadcast/Cablecast Program Nominees". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  3. ^ a b c "2009 Suncoast Regional Emmy Awards Broadcast/Cablecast Program Nominees". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  4. ^ a b c "2007 Rocky Mountain Emmy Nominees". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Reed Cowan bio". WSVN. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  6. ^ "Civil War in the Silver State stories - Las Vegas MyNews3 - KSNV". Mynews3.com. Retrieved 2013-12-08. 
  7. ^ "Obituary: Wesley Swain Cowan". Deseret News. April 27, 2006. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  8. ^ a b Reavy, Pat (April 21, 2007). "Dad dedicating schools built in honor of his son". Deseret News. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  9. ^ a b c Reavy, Pat (May 14, 2007). "Helping African kids soothes dad's heart". Deseret News. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  10. ^ "Special Report - Backyard Danger". WHDH-TV Boston, Massachusetts. February 13, 2008. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  11. ^ a b c d Vanderhooft, JoSelle (January 18, 2009). "Gay Filmmaker Turns Lens on Proposition 8". QSaltlake. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  12. ^ Ververs, Vaughn (July 6, 2006). "On The Other End Of The Lens". CBS News. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  13. ^ a b c Propes, Richard. "review: The Other Side of the Lens". The Independent Critic. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  14. ^ Simmons, Robin (November 6, 2007). "In Wesley's Honor". WSVN. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  15. ^ Youth Crimewatch of America[dead link], "17th National Youth Crime Prevention Conference and International Forum / March 20–23, 2006", accessed 02-02-2009
  16. ^ Power in You, accessed 01-28-2009
  17. ^ a b mybully.org, accessed 01-28-2009
  18. ^ Utah.gov[dead link], accessed 02-02-2009
  19. ^ a b c [1] MINUTES OF THE SENATE EDUCATION STANDING COMMITTEE, Friday, February 3, 2006, accessed 02-01-2009
  20. ^ "SHAPE Honors Young Leaders for Shaping Their Community". Blacktie - South Florida. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  21. ^ "Utah State Honors Robins Awards Recipients". Utah State University. April 27, 2006. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  22. ^ "Reed Cowan, keynote speaker". Utah Council for Crime Prevention. Retrieved 2009-11-01. [dead link]
  23. ^ MapleTree Publishing[dead link], accessed 01-28-2009
  24. ^ [2][dead link]

External links[edit]