Reading Eagle

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Reading Eagle
Reading Eagle front page.jpg
The July 27, 2005 front page of the
Reading Eagle
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
OwnerReading Eagle Company
PublisherWilliam S. Flippin
Founded1868
Headquarters345 Penn St.
Reading, PA 19603-0582
United States
Official websitereadingeagle.com
 
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Reading Eagle
Reading Eagle front page.jpg
The July 27, 2005 front page of the
Reading Eagle
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
OwnerReading Eagle Company
PublisherWilliam S. Flippin
Founded1868
Headquarters345 Penn St.
Reading, PA 19603-0582
United States
Official websitereadingeagle.com

The Reading Eagle is the major daily newspaper in Reading, Pennsylvania, in the United States. This family-owned newspaper has a daily circulation of 49,375 and a Sunday circulation of 70,832.[1] It serves the Reading and Berks County region of Pennsylvania.

Due to skyrocketing debt and plunging circulation, publisher William Flippin's responsibilities were curtailed in 2011 and Peter Barbey was brought on board as CEO. Other executives who were ousted include associate publisher Larry Orkus, board secretary James Flippin, and CFO Micheal Mizak.

History[edit source | edit]

The paper was founded on January 28, 1868.[2] It was initially an afternoon paper, published Sunday through Saturday.

In 1940, the Eagle acquired the Reading Times, which was a morning paper, but they remained separate papers.[3][4][5] The staff of the two papers was combined in 1982.[6] In June 2002, the Reading Times ceased publishing, and the Eagle became a morning paper.[6][7]

Author John Updike worked at the Eagle as a copyboy in his youth for several summer interships in the early 1950s, and wrote several feature articles.[8][9]

In late April 2009, the newspaper laid off 52 employees, about 12% of its workforce, without severance and with two weeks health benefits. The move was a necessary step to cope with the economy and the troubles the newspaper industry specifically is facing.[10][11]

Sunday Edition[edit source | edit]

The banner on its Sunday comics section says "Biggest Comics Section in the Land",[12] although it used to be two full-size sections long. It carries half pages of Prince Valiant and Hagar the Horrible. As of 2012 it also carries the following comic strips:

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Source: ABC audit, date: September 2011
  2. ^ "Newspaper 'Morgue' Vital Need to Editorial Department". Reading Eagle. November 15, 1938. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Eagle Buys Reading Times". The New York Times. January 26, 1940. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Reading Eagle Co. to Install New $2.25 Million Color Press". Reading Eagle. December 21, 1969. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  5. ^ George M. Meiser IX (July 20, 1983). "Newspaper History in Reading had its start in 1789". Reading Eagle. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b "A Short History of Reading Eagle Company". Reading Eagle. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (June 28, 2002). "Reading (Pa.) Eagle Joins with Times". AP Online. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  8. ^ Christopher Lehmann-Haupt (January 28, 2009). "John Updike, a Lyrical Writer of the Middle-Class Man, Dies at 76". The New York Times. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  9. ^ Bruce R. Posten (January 29, 2009). "Before the fame, literary giant John Updike was just a newspaper copy boy". Reading Eagle. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 
  10. ^ Strupp, Joe (May 5, 2009). "'Reading Eagle' Layoffs Offer No Severance". Editor & Publisher. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  11. ^ "Reading Eagle reduces work force". Reading Eagle. May 1, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  12. ^ "Comics section". Reading Eagle. July 9, 2006. Retrieved March 5, 2010. 

External links[edit source | edit]