Ralph Greenberg

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Ralph Greenberg
Born1944 (age 69–70)
NationalityAmerican
FieldsMathematics
InstitutionsUniversity of Washington
Alma materPrinceton University
Doctoral advisorKenkichi Iwasawa
Doctoral studentsMichael Drinen
Li Guo
James Mailhot
Koopa Koo Tak-Lun
 
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Ralph Greenberg
Born1944 (age 69–70)
NationalityAmerican
FieldsMathematics
InstitutionsUniversity of Washington
Alma materPrinceton University
Doctoral advisorKenkichi Iwasawa
Doctoral studentsMichael Drinen
Li Guo
James Mailhot
Koopa Koo Tak-Lun

Ralph Greenberg (born 1944) is an American mathematician who has made notable contributions to number theory, in particular Iwasawa theory.

He attended Princeton University, earning his doctorate in 1971 under the supervision of Kenkichi Iwasawa.[1]

Greenberg's results include a proof (joint with Glenn Stevens) of the Mazur–Tate–Teitelbaum conjecture as well as a formula for the derivative of a p-adic Dirichlet L-function at s = 0 (joint with Bruce Ferrero). Greenberg is also well known for his many conjectures. In his PhD thesis, he conjectured that the Iwasawa μ- and λ-invariants of the cyclotomic Zp-extension of a totally real field are zero. A conjecture that remains open as of September 2012. In the 1980s, he introduced the notion of a Selmer group for a p-adic Galois representation and generalized the "main conjectures" of Iwasawa and Mazur to this setting. He has since generalized this setup to present Iwasawa theory as the theory of p-adic deformations of motives. He also provided an arithmetic theory of L-invariants generalizing his aforementioned work with Glenn Stevens.

He was a invited speaker in International Congress of Mathematicians 2010, Hyderabad on the topic of "Number Theory."[2]

In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[3]

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