Robot Operating System

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Robot Operating System
Original author(s)Willow Garage, Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Initial release2007
Stable releaseHydro Medusa[1] / September 4, 2013; 2 months ago (2013-09-04)
Written in[C++ or Python]
Operating systemLinux
TypeRobotics suite, OS, library
LicenseBSD license
Websitewww.ros.org
 
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Robot Operating System
Original author(s)Willow Garage, Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Initial release2007
Stable releaseHydro Medusa[1] / September 4, 2013; 2 months ago (2013-09-04)
Written in[C++ or Python]
Operating systemLinux
TypeRobotics suite, OS, library
LicenseBSD license
Websitewww.ros.org

Robot Operating System (ROS) is a software framework for robot software development, (see also Robotics middleware) providing operating system-like functionality on a heterogeneous computer cluster. ROS was originally developed in 2007 under the name switchyard by the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in support of the Stanford AI Robot STAIR [2][3] project. As of 2008, development continues primarily at Willow Garage, a robotics research institute/incubator, with more than twenty institutions collaborating in a federated development model.[4][5]

ROS provides standard operating system services such as hardware abstraction, low-level device control, implementation of commonly used functionality, message-passing between processes, and package management. It is based on a graph architecture where processing takes place in nodes that may receive, post and multiplex sensor, control, state, planning, actuator and other messages. The library is geared toward a Unix-like system (Ubuntu Linux is listed as 'supported' while other variants such as Fedora and Mac OS X are considered 'experimental').

ROS has two basic "sides": The operating system side ros as described above and ros-pkg, a suite of user contributed packages (organized into sets called metapackages) that implement functionality such as simultaneous localization and mapping, planning, perception, simulation etc.

Despite the importance of robots' reactivity, ROS is not a realtime OS, though it is possible to integrate ROS with realtime code.[6]

ROS is released under the terms of the BSD license, and is open source software. It is free for commercial and research use. The ros-pkg contributed packages are licensed under a variety of open source licenses.

In August 2013, a blog posting[7] announced that Willow Garage would be absorbed by another company started by its' founder, Suitable Technologies; no announcement as to the fate of continued ROS development had been made by November 2013.

Applications[edit]

ROS areas include:

ROS Package application areas will include:

ROS -Industrial[8] is a BSD-licensed “hardware-agnostic” software development program to create a Unified Robot Description Format (URDF) for industrial robots.

Version History[edit]

ROS releases may be incompatible with other releases and are often referred to by code name rather than version number. The major releases so far are:

Ports to robots and boards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Willow Garage, ROS Hydro Medusa. Link
  2. ^ STanford Artificial Intelligence Robot http://stair.stanford.edu/
  3. ^ Morgan Quigley, Eric Berger, Andrew Y. Ng (2007), STAIR: Hardware and Software Architecture, AAAI 2007 Robotics Workshop 
  4. ^ "Repositories". ROS.org. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  5. ^ Morgan Quigley, Brian Gerkey, Ken Conley, Josh Faust, Tully Foote, Jeremy Leibs, Eric Berger, Rob Wheeler, Andrew Ng. "ROS: an open-source Robot Operating System". Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  6. ^ ROS-Introduction http://wiki.ros.org/ROS/Introduction
  7. ^ http://www.willowgarage.com/blog/2013/08/21/willow-garage-employees-join-suitable-technologies
  8. ^ ROS-Industrial http://ros.org/wiki/Industrial
  9. ^ Baxter http://www.rethinkrobotics.com/products/baxter-research-robot/baxter-research-robot-qa/
  10. ^ K U leuven http://people.mech.kuleuven.be/%7Eu0062536/embsensor.html
  11. ^ HERB http://personalrobotics.intel-research.net/
  12. ^ Husky A200 http://www.clearpathrobotics.com/husky
  13. ^ PR1 http://personalrobotics.stanford.edu/
  14. ^ PR2 http://www.willowgarage.com/pages/robots
  15. ^ rosbridge protocol and server http://www.ros.org/wiki/rosbridge
  16. ^ brown-robotics http://brown-robotics.org/
  17. ^ STAIR I and II http://stair.stanford.edu/index.php
  18. ^ http://robotnik.es/en/products/mobile-robots/summit-xl
  19. ^ http://www.ros.org/wiki/nao
  20. ^ Humanoid Robots Lab http://hrl.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/
  21. ^ brown-robotics http://brown-robotics.org/
  22. ^ G.T. Jay, Post to ros-users mailing list announcing ROS support for the Nao
  23. ^ http://unboundedrobotics.com/ubr-1/specification/
  24. ^ http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/unbounded-robotics-revolutionizes-affordable-mobile-manipulation-with-ubr1
Notes

Related projects[edit]

External links[edit]