Queerty

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Queerty is a popular[1] online magazine covering gay-oriented lifestyle and news, founded in 2005 by David Hauslaib.[2][3].

Description

It is frequently referenced and quoted by mainstream media including the Los Angeles Times,[4] ABC News,[5] The New Republic,[6] Entertainment Weekly,[7] Salon,[8] San Francisco Chronicle,[9] CNET,[10] Minnesota Star Tribune,[11] Belfast Telegraph,[12] and Time Out New York.[13]

Newsweek called it, "a leading site for gay issues".[14]

Related links

Queerty.com

References

  1. ^ Chris Rovzar, "Thank God, the New Subway Hero’s Fame Continues to Day Three", New York Magazine, March 20, 2009
  2. ^ Frank Barnako, "Gay blog is example of Web log strength ", Market Watch, Sept. 16, 2005
  3. ^ Adam L. Penenberg, "Can bloggers strike it rich? ", Wired, Sept. 22, 2005
  4. ^ Maria L. La Ganga, "Love triangle at San Francisco Zoo sparks debate over penguins’ sexuality", Los Angeles Times, June 19, 2009
  5. ^ Luchina Fisher, "Clay's Coming Out Turns Off Some Claymates", ABC News, September 26, 2008
  6. ^ James Kirchick, "Gay Porn's Neocon Kingpin", CBS News, March 20, 2008
  7. ^ Annie Barrett, "Jim Carrey gay sex scene from 'I Love You Phillip Morris' hits the Web, Entertainment Weekly, June 11, 2010
  8. ^ Carol Lloyd, "Expanding the definition of discrimination", Salon, June 19, 2007
  9. ^ Phil Bronstein, "Why is anyone surprised Obama picked Warren?", San Francisco Chronicle, December 8, 2008
  10. ^ "Caroline McCarthy, Report: Entertainment blog network Jossip is for sale", CNET, March 13, 2008
  11. ^ Kristin Tillotson, "Should AIDS Walk ads be sexy?", Star Tribune, November 18, 2009
  12. ^ "'No More Mr Nice Gay' as California Mormons face vote backlash, Belfast Telegraph, November 8, 2008"
  13. ^ Dan Avery, "That ain’t Rite ", Time Out New York, July 7, 2008
  14. ^ "Conservatives and Gay-Rights Advocates Not Happy With 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Compromise, May 25, 2010, Newsweek