Tuya (queen)

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Tuya
Queen consort of Egypt
QueenTuya-ROM-small.jpg
King's Mother Tuya
Full nameTuya or Mut-Tuya
TitlesGreat Royal Wife
BirthplaceThebes?
Place of deathThebes
BuriedValley of the Queens, Thebes
ConsortPharaoh Sety I
Dynasty19th of Egypt
FatherRaia
Mother[R]uia
ChildrenPrincess Tia
Ramesses II
Religious beliefsAncient Egyptian religion
 
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Tuya
Queen consort of Egypt
QueenTuya-ROM-small.jpg
King's Mother Tuya
Full nameTuya or Mut-Tuya
TitlesGreat Royal Wife
BirthplaceThebes?
Place of deathThebes
BuriedValley of the Queens, Thebes
ConsortPharaoh Sety I
Dynasty19th of Egypt
FatherRaia
Mother[R]uia
ChildrenPrincess Tia
Ramesses II
Religious beliefsAncient Egyptian religion
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Queen Tuya
in hieroglyphs
Canopic jar lid of Queen Tuya from the Luxor Museum

Queen Tuya (also called Tuy or Mut-Tuya[1]) was the wife of Pharaoh Seti I of Egypt and mother of Princess Tia, Ramesses II and perhaps Henutmire. She was the daughter of Raia who was a military officer based on his title of Lieutenant of the chariotry.[2] Tuya's daughter, Princess Tia, was married to a high ranking civil servant who was also called Tia.[2]

As the mother of Ramesses II, she enjoyed a privileged existence of a respected king's mother and was allowed the opportunity to correspond with the Hittite royal court after the Year 21 peace treaty between Egypt and Hatti put in place by Ramesses II.

Contents

Monuments and Inscriptions

Statue of Tuya from the Vatican.

Death and Burial

Tuya likely died soon after Year 22 of Ramesses' reign and was buried in an impressive tomb in the Valley of the Queens (QV80).[3] In her tomb, Tuya

"was stripped of the first part of her name to become plain Tuya for eternity; the loss of the prefix Mut- suggests that her death had ended in an almost divine earthly status."[3]

In popular culture

References

  1. ^ Joyce Tyldesley, Ramesses: Egypt's Greatest Pharaohs, Penguin Books, 2000. p.116
  2. ^ a b Tyldesley, p.116
  3. ^ a b c Tyldesley, p.122
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kitchen, K.A., Rammeside Inscriptions, Translated & Annotated, Translations, Volume II, Blackwell Publishers, 1996
  5. ^ C. Desroche Noblecourt, "Abou Simbel, Ramses, et les dames de la couronne" in E. Bleiberg & R. Freed (eds) Fragments of a Shattered Visage: the Proceedings of the International Symposium of Ramesses the Great, 1991. Memphis: p.129