Quando, Quando, Quando

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"Quando, Quando, Quando"
("When, When, When?")
Music byTony Renis
Lyrics byAlberto Testa (original in Italian), José Socrates (Portuguese), Pat Boone (English), Joseph Hieu (Vietnamese), Jo Marcel (Vietnamese), Heldur Karmo (Estonian)
Published1962 (Italian and English versions)
LanguageItalian, English, Portuguese, German, Spanish and Vietnamese
Original artistTony Renis
Recorded byTony Renis, Engelbert Humperdinck
 
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"Quando, Quando, Quando"
("When, When, When?")
Music byTony Renis
Lyrics byAlberto Testa (original in Italian), José Socrates (Portuguese), Pat Boone (English), Joseph Hieu (Vietnamese), Jo Marcel (Vietnamese), Heldur Karmo (Estonian)
Published1962 (Italian and English versions)
LanguageItalian, English, Portuguese, German, Spanish and Vietnamese
Original artistTony Renis
Recorded byTony Renis, Engelbert Humperdinck

"Quando, Quando, Quando" is an Italian pop song from 1962, in the bossa nova style, with music written by Tony Renis and lyrics by Alberto Testa. The song, originally recorded in two different versions by Tony Renis and Emilio Pericoli, competed in the Sanremo Music Festival in 1962, where it placed fourth, and later became a commercial success in Italy, topping the Musica e Dischi singles chart.[1] American entertainer Pat Boone, who recorded the song in 1962, is listed in some sources as the writer of its English-language lyrics, but other sources, including the Songwriters Hall of Fame, say veteran songwriter Ervin Drake was the lyricist.

English language versions[edit]

The title translates as "When, When, When".

The song has been used and remixed by many artists and in many different arrangements. The most notable rendition in English was by pop singer Engelbert Humperdinck. In 2005, Michael Bublé performed the song as a duet with Nelly Furtado. There is an instrumental Latin version by Edgardo Cintron and The Tiempos Noventa Orchestra. The song was a 1962 Billboard Top 100 entry by Pat Boone.

Quando is the only Italian word normally retained in most English-language renditions of the song.

Pat Boone sang the starting piece in a good Italian accent but then carried on the rest of it in English, repeating every now and again some Italian words. The Italian words sung by Boone:

Dimmi quando tu verrai,
dimmi quando... quando... quando...
l'anno, il giorno e l'ora in cui
forse tu mi bacerai...

(Boone says "qui" which means "here" instead of "cui" which means "that").

Other singers:

Other versions[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

The song was used prominently in the 1962 Italian movie The Easy Life.

The song was used in the movie The Blues Brothers (1980): when Jake and Elwood first encounter Murph and The Magictones, they are playing this song at the Holiday Inn.

In the extended cut of the Ivan Reitman film Stripes (1981), Bill Murray begins singing this to avoid being killed by Colombian mercenaries. This scene was not in the theatrical cut.

The song can be heard at the beginning of the 2004 Russian movie A Driver for Vera.

Rory Bremner parodied the song in the 2006 season of the Bremner, Bird and Fortune TV series, playing Gordon Brown and Tony Blair with the former asking when the then prime minister would be leaving office.

It was also used in 2008 in the Fiat Punto advertisements, mimicking the "Portuguese Job".

In the 2006 film Superman Returns, the theme is performed by The Drifters in the elevator scene when Clark Kent and Lois Lane are in the middle of several people reading about the Man of Steel's return in the Daily Planet.

In Rainer Werner Fassbinder's movie The Merchant of Four Seasons a remake of this song plays a central role in the relationship between the two main characters.

Dewey performs a ribbon dance whilst singing the song to distract Lois in season 5 of Malcolm in the Middle.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Billboard Music Week - Hits of the World". Billboard. 31 March 1962. p. 15. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.discogs.com Sergio Franchi