Purdue Boilermakers football

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Purdue Boilermakers football
2013 Purdue Boilermakers football team
Purdue Boilermarkers Workmark.svg
First season1887
Athletic directorMorgan Burke
Head coachDarrell Hazell
1st year, 1–11–0  (.083)
Other staffJohn Shoop (OC)
Greg Hudson (DC)
Home stadiumRoss-Ade Stadium
Year built1924
Stadium capacity62,500[1]
Stadium surfaceBermuda Grass
LocationWest Lafayette, Indiana
LeagueNCAA Division I-FBS
ConferenceBig Ten
DivisionLeaders
West (2014)
Past conferencesIndiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1890–95)
All-time record593–526–48 (.529)
Postseason bowl record9–8
Conference titles12
Heisman winners0
Consensus All-Americans20
Current uniform
BigTen-Uniform-Purdue.png
Colors

Old Gold and Black[2]

          
Fight songHail Purdue!
MascotBoilermaker Special
Purdue Pete
Marching bandPurdue All-American Marching Band
RivalsIndiana Hoosiers
Notre Dame Fighting Irish
Illinois Fighting Illini
WebsitePurdueSports.com
 
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Purdue Boilermakers football
2013 Purdue Boilermakers football team
Purdue Boilermarkers Workmark.svg
First season1887
Athletic directorMorgan Burke
Head coachDarrell Hazell
1st year, 1–11–0  (.083)
Other staffJohn Shoop (OC)
Greg Hudson (DC)
Home stadiumRoss-Ade Stadium
Year built1924
Stadium capacity62,500[1]
Stadium surfaceBermuda Grass
LocationWest Lafayette, Indiana
LeagueNCAA Division I-FBS
ConferenceBig Ten
DivisionLeaders
West (2014)
Past conferencesIndiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1890–95)
All-time record593–526–48 (.529)
Postseason bowl record9–8
Conference titles12
Heisman winners0
Consensus All-Americans20
Current uniform
BigTen-Uniform-Purdue.png
Colors

Old Gold and Black[2]

          
Fight songHail Purdue!
MascotBoilermaker Special
Purdue Pete
Marching bandPurdue All-American Marching Band
RivalsIndiana Hoosiers
Notre Dame Fighting Irish
Illinois Fighting Illini
WebsitePurdueSports.com

The Purdue Boilermakers football team team represents Purdue University (also referred to as simply "PURDUE") in the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of college football. Darrell Hazell is Purdue's current head coach, the 35th in the program's history. Purdue plays its home games on Ross-Ade Stadium on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. The Boilermakers compete in the Big Ten Conference as a member of the Leaders Division.[3] In 2014, the Big Ten will realign, and Purdue will be joining the West Division.[4]

With a 593–526–48 record at the conclusion of the 2013 season, Purdue has the 45th most victories among NCAA FBS programs.[5] Purdue was originally classified as a Major College school in the 1937 season until 1972. Purdue received Division I classification in 1973, becoming a Division I-A program from 1978 to 2006 and an FBS program from 2006 to the present.[6] The Boilermakers have registered 64 winning seasons in their history, with 19 of those seasons resulting in eight victories or more, 10 seasons resulting in at least nine wins, and just one season with ten victories or more.[7] Of those successful campaigns, Purdue has produced five unbeaten seasons in its history, going 4–0 in 1891, 8–0 in 1892, 8–0 in 1929, 7–0–1 in 1932 and 9–0 in 1943.[7] The Boilermakers have won a total of 12 conference championships in their history, including four Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association titles and eight Big Ten Conference titles.

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

Purdue's 1890 football team

The Purdue University football team traces its origin back to October 29, 1887 when its team fell to Butler College by a score of 48-6 in Indianapolis, Indiana.[8]

Facilities[edit]

Stuart Field (1892–1924)[edit]

Stuart Field was dedicated on April 16, 1892,[9] and named for Charles B. and William V. Stuart, two brothers who served on the university's board of trustees.[10] Originally a seven-acre[10] (2.8 ha) field with eight hundred seats,[9] by the 1910s it was expanded to twice that area[10] and a seating capacity of five thousand.[11]

Ross-Ade Stadium (1924-present)[edit]

Ross-Ade Stadium during a game in 2006

The Boilermakers have called Ross-Ade Stadium home since 1924. It is named for David E. Ross and George Ade, the principal benefactors. Ross–Ade Stadium opened on November 22, 1924 with a seating capacity of 13,500 and standing room for an additional 5,000 people.[12] A series of additions and renovations pushed the seating capacity to almost 68,000 (70,000 with standing room). In 2001 Purdue University began a $70 million renovation, which led to a reduced seating capacity of 62,500.

Mollenkopf Athletic Center[edit]

An indoor training facility used primarily for the football team. It includes a full practice football field, extensive weight room, and offices for the football program. Also housed in Mollenkopf is the Purdue Football Hall of Glory.

Culture[edit]

Marching band[edit]

The Purdue All-American Marching Band is the marching band of Purdue University. The Purdue "All-American" Marching Band (AAMB) is the primary source of auxiliary entertainment for Purdue University football games. AAMB does many service performances for high schools, junior high schools, and elementary schools, and has been the host band of the Indianapolis 500 race every year the race has been held since 1927. The band has grown from an original 5 members to 373 members, making it one of the largest marching bands in the world. The two most distinctive features of the AAMB are the World's Largest Drum and solo baton twirler the Purdue Golden Girl.

In 1886 the Purdue Student Army Training Corps produced 5 men who provided music for the Army trainees to listen to during their morning conditioning runs. While operating without a director until 1904, the band had started playing at Purdue football games and had grown to over 50 members. In 1904, Paul Spotts Emrick, joined the band. His experience as a conductor resulted in his election as band president and director the next year. During his senior year at Purdue, the marching band, under Emrick, became the first band to break ranks and form a letter on the field—the famous Block "P".[13]

Emrick stayed on as director after his graduation in 1908. In 1921 Emrick commissioned Leedy to construct the World's Largest Drum, and it has been a part of the marching band ever since. In 1935, during a Purdue football game at Northwestern University the band donned lights on their uniforms while performing at halftime. With the stadium lights turned off for the performance, the band drew such awe from radio broadcaster Ted Husing, he referred to them as a "truly All-American marching band," hence the current title of the band.

Mascot[edit]

Boilermaker Special[edit]

The former official mascot of Purdue : The Boilermaker Special V (1993-2011)

The Boilermaker Special is the official mascot of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. It resembles a Victorian-era railroad locomotive and is built on a truck chassis. It is operated and maintained by the student members of the Purdue Reamer Club.

Purdue University is a land-grant university (or Agricultural and Mechanical (A&M) university) created through the Morrill Act of 1862. In the 1890s, Purdue became a leader in the research of railway technology. For many years Purdue operated the "Schenectady No. 1", and later the "Schenectady No. 2", on a dynamometer in an engineering laboratory on the West Lafayette campus. These were 4-4-0 type steam locomotives manufactured by the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Schenectady was a classic Victorian-era design similar in construction to the Western and Atlantic Railroad No. 3 (see The General (locomotive) on display at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History). Purdue even operated its own railroad to connect the campus to a main rail line. In the 1930s the dynamometer was decommissioned and the Schenectady No. 2 was retired as the railroad industry in the United States converted from steam to diesel-electric locomotives.

Purdue did not have a mascot. In 1939, Purdue student Israel Selkowitz suggested the school adopt an official mascot to represent Purdue's engineering heritage. He originally proposed a "mechanical man". After much debate, it was decided to build a locomotive on an automobile chassis. This choice allowed the mascot to build on Purdue's engineering and railroading heritage, as well as represent the school's nickname "Boilermakers" in a meaningful way.

The "Boilermaker" nickname came about during the early years of Purdue football. There had been rumors the university enrolled burly boilermakers from the Monon Railroad shops in Lafayette, Indiana as students/football players to help beef up the scrawny football team. When a railroad operated an extra train independent of the scheduled timetable, it was known as a "special". Thus, the trains which carried Purdue's sporting teams and their fans to other cities for athletic contests were known as "Boilermaker Specials". It was a perfect match.

Financial and moral support for the first Boilermaker Special was provided by key members of the Purdue University graduating class of 1907, and members of the Purdue Reamer Club from the graduating classes of 1940 and 1941.

Purdue Pete[edit]

Purdue Pete

Purdue Pete was first designed as a logo by the University Bookstore in 1940.[14] They would put it on their products and portray him dressed up in different clothes for the different majors. He got the Purdue part of his name from Purdue University.[15] The owners of the bookstores gave him the name “Pete”, yet no one officially knows why this was chosen to be his name.[15] He was given a physical identity in 1956 as he came out and helped the students cheer at a pep rally.[14] Over the years, the appearance of Purdue Pete has gone under several drastic changes as well as several minor changes. His original head was made of paper-mâché, pasted onto a chicken wire frame.[15] This was very inconvenient for the person who would be underneath because it would limit his movements, yet he was still expected to move around and do stunts.[15] This head was changed to a giant fiberglass head where the person inside would use a harness to support it. This was unpractical due to the sheer size of it. In the 1980s, Purdue Pete acquired the appearance he is now associated with.[15] Proposals to switch to a soft-sculpture costume were rejected in 2006 and 2011.[16][17]

Rivalries[edit]

Purdue's major rival has always been Indiana University, with whom they play for the Old Oaken Bucket, but during the Joe Tiller era the rivalry with Notre Dame in football has become the most heated and most competitive with Joe Tiller led teams going 5-7 vs. Notre Dame. Danny Hope picked up the Shillelagh Trophy with a 24-21 loss in his first season as head coach. In addition, Purdue has a long-standing rivalry with Illinois, with whom they play for the Purdue Cannon trophy.

Due to having an odd number of teams from 1993 to 2010, the Big Ten utilized a rotating system of conference games. Every school was designated two official rivals, whom they played every year. The official rivals for Purdue were Indiana and Northwestern. However, after the expansion of the Big Ten to 12 schools, Purdue and Northwestern were placed into separate conference divisions and will no longer play each other on an annual basis. Beginning in 2011, Purdue's new designated cross-division rival will be Iowa. This matchup has been mocked by fans of both teams. The other cross-divisional rivalries set up by the Big Ten had some history or a trophy behind the pairing, but Purdue and Iowa were left over. The fans of Iowa and Purdue have taken this in stride and both now refer to each other, jokingly, as "OMHR" ("Our Most Hated Rival"), or "The Rivalry Jim Delany Forced On Us."

Trophy games[edit]

Cradle of Quarterbacks[edit]

Bob DeMoss, the oldest member of the Cradle of Quarterbacks

Purdue's football program has long been known for it's proliffic passing quarterbacks, ranging from players who have set School, Big Ten & NCAA records, to being named All-Americans and finalist for national awards, to being elected into the College Football and Pro Football Hall of Fames.[18] This great tradition has led to the school being nicknamed the "Cradle of Quarterbacks". When Drew Brees led the New Orleans Saints to a victory in Super Bowl XLIV, Purdue became just the second college in history to produce 3 different Super Bowl winning quarterbacks.[18]

Currently the cradle contains 12 members:

NameYears as StarterNFL Draft
Curtis Painter2005-08201st Pick by the Indianapolis Colts
Kyle Orton2001-04106th Pick by the Chicago Bears
Drew Brees1998-200032nd Pick by the San Diego Chargers
Jim Everett1981-853rd Pick by the Houston Oilers
Scott Campbell1980-83191st Pick by the Pittsburgh Steelers
Mark Herrmann1977-8098th Pick by the Denver Broncos
Gary Danielson1970-72Went Undrafted
Mike Phipps1967-693rd Pick by the Cleveland Browns
Bob Griese1964-664th Pick by the Miami Dolphins
Len Dawson1954-565th Pick by the Pittsburgh Steelers
Dale Samuels1950-5228th Pick by the Chicago Cardinals
Bob DeMoss1945-50280th Pick by the New York Giants

Den of Defensive Ends[edit]

Purdue has also had a more recent tradition of sending defensive ends to the NFL. Since 1999, Purdue has had 9 defensive ends selected in the NFL Draft. With their success in the NFL, Purdue has earned the nickname, the "Den of Defensive Ends."[19]

Currently the Den contains 12 members:

NameYears as StarterNFL Draft
Leo Sugar1949-51123rd Pick by the Chicago Cardinals
Lamar Lundy1954-5647th Pick by the Los Angeles Rams
Keena Turner1976-7939th Pick by the Miami Dolphins
Rosevelt Colvin1995-98111th Pick by the Chicago Bears
Chike Okeafor1994-96, 199889th Pick by the San Francisco 49ers
Akin Ayodele1999-200189th Pick by the Jacksonville Jaguars
Shaun Phillips2000-0398th Pick by the San Diego Chargers
Ray Edwards2003-05127th Pick by the Minnesota Vikings
Rob Ninkovich2004-05135th Pick by the New Orleans Saints
Anthony Spencer2003-0626th Pick by the Dallas Cowboys
Cliff Avril2004-0792nd Pick by the Detroit Lions
Ryan Kerrigan2007-1016th Pick by the Washington Redskins

Logos and uniforms[edit]

Purdue's colors are Old Gold and Black, as are their uniforms. Home uniforms are black with white numerals and old gold outline. On the sleeve is the player's number in white, outlined in old gold, along with two outer old gold stripes and a black one inside at the end of the sleeve. The pants are old gold with two black stripes along both sides. The away uniform is white with black numerals and old gold outline. Both home and away jerseys sport the Purdue slant "P" logo in the center front of the collar, surrounded by a patch of black fabric. The away pants are black with two old gold stripes. Since the arrival of Joe Tiller in 1997, Purdue players have not worn names on the backs of their jerseys. This is the first year under Danny Hope that the players will wear their names on the backs of their jerseys.

The helmet is old gold with the Purdue "P" in black with a white outline on both sides. There are three stripes down the middle; two outer black ones, and one thick inner white one. The facemask is black.

Before Tiller, the team wore uniforms that sported the school's name across the front of the jersey, and the old gold color was more pronounced, with almost a copper hue. In Tiller's first season, the helmet color was lightened substantially, as was the gold used on the rest of the uniform.

Purdue's Pride sticker (given out for good performances) was the Purdue logo (locomotive). This was changed in 2006 to a sledgehammer with the slant "P" in the hammer's head (like the one wielded by mascot Purdue Pete). In the 2006 game against the Indiana State Sycamores, Purdue wore a throwback uniform from 1966, in honor of the 40th anniversary of the school's first Rose Bowl team. It featured a white jersey with two outer black stripes on the shoulder and one inner gold stripe. The numerals were black with no outline. They wore gold pants with two black stripes on the sides, and the helmets were old gold with black numbers and one black stripe down the middle. The gold in the throwback uniforms was more yellow in hue than that in the regular 1997–present uniforms.

In 2002, Purdue changed from its black home jersey to an old gold jersey. The old gold uniforms had white numerals and black outline for home games, and white uniforms with old gold numbers and back outline for away games. Some complained that the numerals on the jersey were too hard to see, so in 2003 they changed to an old gold jersey with black numerals outlined in white, and white pants with two black stripes down the sides. After losing their opening game at home to Bowling Green, Tiller and the team decided to dump the gold jerseys and go back to the black uniforms. After they changed back to the black uniforms, the team came out to Back in Black by AC/DC for every home game in 2003. Since then, Purdue has stayed with the black uniforms. In one game against Wisconsin in 2006, the Boilermakers wore the black jersey with black pants. They hadn't sported an all-black look at home since the last game of the season in 1996 against Indiana. In 2009, Purdue also wore the Black on Black in a night game against Notre Dame on the Purdue Blackout, and then wore them for the remainder of their home games. In 2010, the Black on Black remained the normal home uniform with the exception being the Homecoming game against Minnesota where the team donned Throwback Uniforms for the 2001 Rose Bowl team. While the original jerseys were made by Champion, the replicas were Nike branded.

Coaches[edit]

Current coaching staff[edit]

  • Head Coach
Darrell Hazell
  • Offensive Coaches
Jim Bridge – Offensive Line
Gerad Parker - Tight Ends
Kevin Sherman - Wide Receivers
John Shoop - Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
Jafar Williams - Running Backs
  • Defensive Coaches
Rubin Carter - Defensive Line
Marcus Freeman - Linebackers
Greg Hudson - Defensive Coordinator
Jon Heacock - Cornerbacks
  • Special Teams Coaches
Currently Vacant - Special Teams Coordinator

[20]

Head coaches[edit]

The Purdue Boilermakers have had 36 head coaches throughout the program's history. With 87 victories, Joe Tiller is first overall in the program's history, followed by Jack Mollenkopf (84 wins) and Noble Kizer (42).[21]

Purdue University Boilermakers Head Coaches
NameSeasonsRecord
Albert Berg18870–1
George Andrew Reisner18892–1
Clinton L. Hare18903–3
Knowlton Ames1891–9212–0
D.M. Balliet1893–95, 190122–10–2
S. M. Hammond18964–2–1
William H. Church18975–3–1
Alpha Jamison1898–190011–11–1
Charles Best19027–2–1
Oliver Cutts1903–0413–5
Albert E. Herrnstein19056–1–1
Myron E. Witham19060–5
NameSeasonsRecord
Leigh C. Turner19070–5
Frederick A. Speik1908–096–8
Bill Horr1910–128–11–3
Andy Smith1913–1512–6–3
Cleo A. O'Donnell1916–175–8–1
A. G. Scanlon1918–207–12–1
William Henry Dietz19211–6
James Phelan1922–2935–22–5
Noble Kizer1930–3642–13–3
Mal Elward1937–4116–18–6
Elmer Burnham1942–4310–8
Cecil Isbell1944–4514–14–1
NameSeasonsRecord
Stu Holcomb1946–5535–42–4
Jack Mollenkopf1956–6984–39–9
Bob DeMoss1970–7213–18
Alex Agase1973–7618–25–1
Jim Young1977–8138–19–1
Leon Burtnett1982–8621–34–1
Fred Akers1987–9012–31–1
Jim Colletto1991–9621–42–3
Joe Tiller1997–200887–62
Danny Hope2009–1222–27
Patrick Higgins20120–1
Darrell Hazell2013–present1–11


Notable former assistant coaches[edit]

The Boilermakers football program has had several assistant coaches who went on to make notable achievements, from longevity in their tenure as collegiate coaches to becoming head coaches at the NCAA FBS level.

Kevin Sumlin, former Purdue linebacker and wide receivers coach.
Wide Receivers (1991–93)
Defensive Coordinator (1987–91)
Graduate Assistant (1986)
Secondary (1971–76)
Offensive Coordinator (1982–84)
Linebackers Coach (1983–84)
Tight Ends Coach (1985)
Offensive Line Coach (1986)
Assistant (1950–69)
Assistant (1935–42)
Assistant Coach (1950)
Assistant (1930-33; 1951-52)
Offensive Line Coach (1997–01)
Associate Head Coach/Offensive Line Coach (2008)
Assistant (1942–43)
Assistant (1945)
  • Emmet Lowery
Assistant (1945–46)
Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator (1977)
Offensive Assistant (1965–70)
Graduate Assistant (1975–76)
Offensive Assistant (1946–49)
Offensive Assistant (1971)
  • Dale Samuels
Offensive Assistant (1960–63) (1970–72)
Quarterbacks Coach (1987–88)
Graduate Assistant (1984–85)
Linebackers (1991–94)
Defensive Coordinator (1997–08)
Quarterbacks (1978–86)
Assistant (1956)
Offensive Assistant (1948–55)
Wide Receivers Coach (1998–2000)
Assistant (1926–27) (1936–46)
Defensive Line Coach/Defensive Coordinator (1983–86)
Offensive Assistant (1973–76)

Team accomplishments[edit]

Championships[edit]

Purdue has won or shared a conference championship on 12 occasions, including four Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association titles and eight Big Ten Conference titles.[22] As members of the Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association and the Big Ten, the Boilermakers have amassed a record of 154–64–3 (.703 winning percentage) in conference play.

Purdue Conference Championships
SeasonCoachTitle(s)RecordConf. Record
1891Knowlton AmesIIAA Champion4–04–0
1892Knowlton AmesIIAA Champion8–04–0
1893D.M. BallietIIAA Champion5–2–14–0
1894D.M. BallietIIAA Champion9–14–0
1918A. G. ScanlonBig Ten Co-Champion3–31–0
1929James PhelanBig Ten Champion8–05–0
SeasonCoachTitle(s)RecordConf. Record
1931Noble KizerBig Ten Co-Champion9–15–1
1932Noble KizerBig Ten Co-Champion7–0–15–0–1
1943Elmer BurnhamBig Ten Co-Champion9–06–0
1952Stu HolcombBig Ten Co-Champion4–3–14–1–1
1967Jack MollenkopfBig Ten Co-Champion8–26–1
2000Joe TillerBig Ten Co-Champion#8–46–2
# - denotes Bowl Championship Series representative as conference champion

Bowl games[edit]

Purdue has participated in 17 bowl games throughout its history, compiling a 9–8 record.[23] The Purdue did not appear frequently in post-season play from 1967 to 1984, but they played well, winning 4 of 5 bowl games including four consecutive wins between 1967 and 1980. When Tiller arrived in 1997, Purdue went to eight consecutive bowl games, but only won three of the eight bowl games. Tiller would lead the Boilermakers to a total of 10 bowl games in his 12 seasons as head coach.[24] Of those 17 bowl appearances, the Boilermakers have participated in 1 "major" Division I-A/FBS bowl games, which was part of the BCS Bowl Games. The Boilermakers have never played in a National Championship Game.

Purdue Bowl Game Appearances
SeasonBowlOpponentScoreResult
1966Rose BowlUSC14–13Win
1978Peach BowlGeorgia Tech41–21Win
1979Bluebonnet BowlTennessee27–24Win
1980Liberty BowlMissouri28–25Win
1984Peach BowlVirginia24–27Loss
1997Alamo Bowl#24 Oklahoma State33–20Win
1998Alamo Bowl#4 Kansas State37–34Win
1999Outback Bowl#21 Georgia25–28Loss
2000Rose Bowl #4 Washington24–34Loss
SeasonBowlOpponentScoreResult
2001Sun Bowl#13 Washington State27–33Loss
2002Sun BowlWashington34–24Win
2003Capital One Bowl#11 Georgia27–34Loss
2004Sun Bowl#21 Arizona State23–27Loss
2006Champs Sports BowlMaryland7–24Loss
2007Motor City BowlCentral Michigan51–48Win
2011Little Caesars Pizza BowlWestern Michigan37–32Win
2012Heart of Dallas BowlOklahoma State14–58Loss
† - denotes Bowl Championship Series game

Rankings[edit]

Purdue has finished a season ranked in the Associated Press (AP) poll on 17 occasions.[25] The Boilermakers have finished ranked amongst the top 10 in college football on five occasions. Purdue attained its highest-ever ranking in the polls during the preseason of the 1968 season, when they were ranked #1 in the AP Poll for 6 straight weeks before they lost to #4 Ohio State 0-13.[25][26] Since the implementation of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) in 1998, Purdue has finished the regular season ranked one time in the final BCS standings. While the Boilermakers are 54–175–5 against opponents ranked in the AP Poll, they have an all-time record of 111–65–10 when ranked in the AP Poll themselves.[27]

Purdue Rankings in the AP Poll
SeasonRecordAP
19439–05
19524–3–218
19586–1–213
19604–4–119
19616–312
19669–27
19678–29
19688–210
19698–218
SeasonRecordAP
19789–2–113
197910–215
19809–317
19979–315
19989–424
19997–525
20008–413
20039–418


"Spoilermakers"[edit]

Purdue has knocked off the #1 ranked football team in college football seven times over the years—the third most of all the Division I teams in college football. Only Notre Dame and Oklahoma have accomplished this more times.[28]

Individual accolades[edit]

Heisman Trophy candidates[edit]

Bob Griese, two-time Heisman Trophy candidate and 1966 Sammy Baugh Trophy recipient

Purdue has produced eight Heisman Trophy candidates. Four Boilermakers, Bob Griese, Leroy Keyes, Mark Herrmann and Drew Brees have each been finalist for the award in two separate seasons.

SeasonPlayerPlaceVotes
1943Tony Butkovich8th65
1965Bob Griese8th193
1966Bob Griese2nd618
1967Leroy Keyes3rd1,366
1968Leroy Keyes2nd1,103
1969Mike Phipps2nd1,334
1972Otis Armstrong8th208
1979Mark Herrmann8th54
1980Mark Herrmann4th405
1985Jim Everett6th77
1999Drew Brees4th308
2000Drew Brees3rd619

Major award winners[edit]

A total of 6 Boilermaker players and coaches have either won numerous major college football awards.

Purdue Major Award Winners
SeasonNamePos.Award
1966Bob GrieseQBSammy Baugh
1969Mike PhippsQBSammy Baugh
1980Mark HerrmannQBSammy Baugh
SeasonNamePos.Award
2000Drew BreesQBMaxwell
2000Tim StrattonTEJohn Mackey
2001Travis DorschPRay Guy

All-Americans[edit]

A total of 50 Boilermakers have been recognized as All-Americans by various media selectors.[29] Among those selections, twenty have achieved Consensus All-American status. Of those consensus All-Americans, seven were unanimous selections.[30]

Purdue All-Americans
SeasonNamePos.
1929Elmer Sleight*OT
1929Ralph Welch*FB
1931Charles MillerC
1931Paul MossEnd
1932Roy HorstmannFB
1932Paul Moss#End
1933Duane Purvis*RB
1934Duane PurvisRB
1939Dave RankinEnd
1940Dave Rankin*End
1943Alex Agase*G
1943Tony ButkovichFB
1944Babe DimancheffHB
1945Tom HughesT
1951Leo SugarDE
SeasonNamePos.
1952Bernie Flowers*End
1954Tom BettisG
1958Tom FranckhauserCB
1958Gene SelawskiK
1960Jerry BeaboutTE
1962Don BrummT
1964Harold WellsDE
1965Bob Griese*QB
1965Karl SingerOT
1965Jerry ShayDT
1966Jim BeirneEnd
1966John CharlesDB
1966Bob GrieseQB
1967Leroy Keyes#HB
1968Leroy Keyes#HB/DB
SeasonNamePos.
1968Chuck Kyle*G
1969Tim FoleyDB
1969Mike Phipps#QB
1971Tom LukenOG
1972Otis Armstrong*HB
1972Dave Butz*DT
1973Carl CapriaDB
1974Larry BurtonWR
1975Ken LongOT
1975Ken NovakDT
1979Mark HerrmannQB
1980Mark Herrmann#QB
1980Dave Young#TE
1985Rod WoodsonDB
1986Rod Woodson*DB
SeasonNamePos.
1989Shawn McCarthyP
1990Steve JacksonDB
1995Mike AlstottRB
1997Brian AlfordWR
1999Drew BreesQB
2000Drew BreesQB
2000Matt LightOT
2001Travis Dorsch*P
2003Stuart SchweigertS
2004Taylor Stubblefield#WR
2006Anthony SpencerDE
2010Ryan Kerrigan#DE
* - denotes Consensus All-Americans
# - denotes Unanimous All-Americans

Conference award winners[edit]

During Purdue's 116-season tenure with the Big Ten Conference, a total of 18 Boilermakers have been recognized with superlative conference honors.

Purdue Conference Award Winners
SeasonNamePos.Award
1966Bob GrieseQBChicago Tribune Silver Football
1967Leroy KeyesRBChicago Tribune Silver Football
1969Mike PhippsQBChicago Tribune Silver Football
1972Otis ArmstrongRBChicago Tribune Silver Football
1978Jim YoungHead CoachDave McClain Coach of the Year
1980Mark HerrmanQBChicago Tribune Silver Football
1984Leon BurtnettHead CoachDave McClain Coach of the Year
1988Brian FoxQBFreshman of the Year
1989Eric HunterQBFreshman of the Year
SeasonNamePos.Award
1991Corey RogersRBFreshman of the Year
1992Jeff ZgoninaDTDefensive Player of the Year
1997Joe TillerHead CoachDave McClain Coach of the Year
1998Drew BreesQBOffensive Player of the Year
2000Stuart SchweigertSFreshman of the Year
2000Drew BreesQBOffensive Player of the Year
2000Drew BreesQBChicago Tribune Silver Football
2010Ryan KerriganDEDefensive Lineman of the Year
2010Ryan KerriganDEDefensive Player of the Year

Hall of Fame inductees[edit]

College Football Hall of Fame[edit]

Jack Mollenkopf, Purdue Head Coach (1955–69)

A total of fourteen Boilermakers have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Inducted 1963.[31]
Inducted 2012.[32]
Inducted 2012.[33]
Inducted 1989.[34]
Inducted 1984.[35]
Inducted 2010.[36]
Inducted 1967.[37]
Inducted 1990.[38]
Inducted 1988.[39]
Inducted 1955.[40]
Inducted 1973.[41]
Inducted 2006.[42]
Inducted 1951.[43]
Inducted 1999.[44]

Pro Football Hall of Fame[edit]

Four Boilermakers hold the distinguished title of Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees.

Purdue Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame[edit]

Since its institution in 1994, the Purdue University Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame recognizes those participants that have helped elevate Boilermaker athletics into one of the most respected programs in the nation. Former athletes, coaches and administrators are eligible for selection 5 years following their association with Purdue athletics.[45] The following individuals have been inducted into the Purdue Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame for their contributions to the Boilermaker football program:


Boilermakers in professional football[edit]

Drew Brees, currently of the New Orleans Saints

Purdue has produced a total of 184 NFL draft selections.[46] The following "Active" and "All-Star" lists account for past and present Purdue University football players that have participated in the National Football League, the Canadian Football League, and the Arena Football League.

Active[edit]

As of September 2013, there are a total of 22 Boilermakers listed on team rosters in the NFL,[47] CFL,[48] and AFL.[49]

Active players playing in other leagues[edit]

All-Stars[edit]

Among the numerous Boilermakers that have participated in the NFL, CFL, and AFL, a total of 34 have received all-star recognition by their respective leagues.

Mike Alstott, Purdue's all-time leading rusher and six-time NFL Pro Bowl selection
NFL Pro Bowl (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002)[50]
NFL All-Pro (1996, 1997, 1998, 1999)[50]
NFL Pro Bowl (1974, 1976)[51]
NFL All-Pro (1974)[51]
NFL Pro Bowl (1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1968)[52]
NFL All-Pro (1961)[52]
NFL Pro Bowl (1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)[53]
NFL All-Pro (1948, 1949, 1950, 1951)[53]
NFL 1950s All-Decade Team
NFL Pro Bowl (1969)[54]
NFL Pro Bowl (2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012)[55]
NFL All-Pro (2006)[55]
NFL Pro Bowl (1955, 1956)[56]
NFL Pro Bowl (1968)[57]
NFL Pro Bowl (1983)[58]
NFL All-Pro (1983)[58]
NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
NFL Pro Bowl (1962, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971)[59]
NFL All-Pro (1962, 1966)[59]
Super Bowl IV MVP
NFL Man of the Year Award (1973)
2nd Team, AFL All-Time Team
Kansas City Chiefs #16 retired
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1987)
NFL Pro Bowl (1991, 1997)[60]
NFL All-Pro (1991)[60]
NFL Pro Bowl (1938, 1939, 1940)[61]
NFL All-Pro (1940)[61]
NFL Pro Bowl (1990)[62]
NFL Pro Bowl (1969, 1970, 1971, 1973)[63]
NFL Pro Bowl (1979)[64]
NFL Pro Bowl (1952, 1953, 1954, 1955)[65]
NFL Pro Bowl (1990, 1991, 1992. 1994)[66]
NFL All-Pro (1990, 1991, 1994)[66]
NFL 1990s All-Decade Team
NFL Pro Bowl (1967, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1978)[67]
NFL All-Pro (1971, 1977)[67]
Miami Dolphins #12 retired
Miami Dolphins Honor Roll
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1990)
  • Steve Griffin - WR, DB
ArenaBowl II MVP[68]
NFL Pro Bowl (2006)[69]
NFL Pro Bowl (1938, 1939, 1970, 1941, 1942)[70]
NFL All-Pro (1941)[70]
Packers Hall of Fame
NFL 1930s All-Decade Team
NFL Pro Bowl (1967)[71]
NFL Pro Bowl (1963)[72]
NFL Pro Bowl (2006, 2007, 2010)[73]
NFL All-Pro (2007)[73]
NFL Pro Bowl (1959)[74]
NFL Pro Bowl (1940, 1941)[75]
NFL Pro Bowl (1959)[76]
NFL Pro Bowl (1942)[77]
NFL Pro Bowl (2010)[78]
NFL Pro Bowl (1979, 1980)[79]
NFL Pro Bowl (1996)[80]
CFL All-Star (2013)
Grey Cup Most Valuable Player (2013)[79]
NFL Pro Bowl (1958, 1960)[81]
NFL Pro Bowl (1984)[82]
NFL Pro Bowl (1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002)[83]
NFL All-Pro (1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 2002)[83]
Pittsburgh Steelers All-Time Team
NFL Defensive Player of the Year (1993)
UPI AFL-AFC Player of the Year (1993)
NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
NFL 1990s All-Decade Team

NFL top 50 draft selections[edit]

Of Purdue's 185 players selected in the NFL Draft, 55 Boilermakers have been amongst the top 50 selections of the draft.[84]

  • Frank Loebs
1936 - 27th overall by the New York Giants
  • Dick Sandefur
1936 - 39th overall by the Pittsburgh Pirates
1937 - 10th overall by the Cleveland Rams
1938 - 7th overall by the Green Bay Packers
  • Marty Schreyer
1938 - 22nd overall by the Green Bay Packers
1939 - 19th overall by the Philadelphia Eagles
1940 - 24th overall by the Green Bay Packers
  • Frank Bykowski
1940 - 42nd overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
1944 - 19th overall by the Boston Yanks
1945 - 44th overall by the Boston Yanks
1946 - 36th overall by the Green Bay Packers
  • Phil O'Reilly
1948 - 45th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
  • Bob Pfohl
1948 - 46th overall by the New York Giants
1949 - 13th overall by the New York Bulldogs
1950 - 32nd overall by the Washington Redskins
  • Earl Murray
1950 - 41st overall by the Baltimore Colts
  • Barry French
1951 - 45t overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
1952 - 21st overall by the Chicago Cardinals
1953 - 14th overall by the Baltimore Colts
  • Dale Samuels
1953 - 28th overall by the Chicago Cardinals
1955 - 5th overall by the Green Bay Packers
1956 - 17th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
  • Dick Murley
1956 - 39th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
1957 - 5th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
1957 - 47th overall by the Los Angeles Rams
1958 - 42nd overall by the Chicago Bears
1959 - 33rd overall by the Los Angeles Rams
1960 - 33rd overall by the Cleveland Browns
1963 - 13th overall by the St. Louis Cardinals
1965 - 17th overall by the Cleveland Browns
1966 - 7th overall by the Minnesota Vikings
1967 - 4th overall by the Miami Dolphins
1967 - 21st overall by the Boston Patriots
1969 - 3rd overall by the Philadelphia Eagles
1970 - 3rd overall by the Cleveland Browns
1973 - 5th overall by the St. Louis Cardinals
1973 - 9th overall by the Denver Broncos
1973 - 19th overall by the New England Patriots
1975 - 7th overall by the New Orleans Saints
1976 - 7th overall by the Cleveland Browns
1976 - 20th overall by the Baltimore Colts
  • Ken Long
1976 - 44th overall by the Detroit Lions
1980 - 39th overall by the San Francisco 49ers
1981 - 32nd overall by the New York Giants
  • Don Anderson
1985 - 32nd overall by the Indianapolis Colts
1986 - 3rd overall by the Houston Oilers
1987 - 10th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers
1988 - 47th overall by the Los Angeles Rams
1996 - 35th overall by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
2001 - 32nd overall by the San Diego Chargers
2001 - 48th overall by the New England Patriots
2007 - 26th overall by the Dallas Cowboys
2008 - 30th overall by the New York Jets
2011 - 16th overall by the Washington Redskins
2013 - 44th overall by the Carolina Panthers


Records[edit]

All statistical records are courtesy of the Purdue Football Record Book unless otherwise cited. Statistics containing the "#" symbol denote NCAA FBS records.

Team records[edit]

16 (1891–93)[85]
8 (1997–2004)
4 (1966–1969, 1997–2000)
96 vs. Butler (1893)
In a Game: 763 vs. Indiana (2004)
In a Season: 446 (2007)
In a Regular Season Game: 96 vs. Butler (1893)
In a Bowl Game: 51 vs. Central Michigan (Motor City Bowl, 2007)[86]

Individual records[edit]

Kory Sheets, Purdue's total touchdown leader
  • Total Offense
Career: Drew Brees - 12,692 yards
Season: Drew Brees - 4,189 yards (2000)
Game: Curtis Painter vs. Central Michigan - 540 yards (2007)
  • Total Touchdowns Scored
Career: Kory Sheets - 54
Season: Leroy Keyes (1967) - 19
Game: Elmer Oliphant (1912), Mike Northington (1973) & Mike Alstott - 5
  • Total Touchdowns Responsible For
Career: Drew Brees - 106
Season: Drew Brees (1998) - 42
Game: Drew Brees (2× 1998), Kyle Orton (2004) & Curtis Painter (2007) - 6
  • Total Points Scored (Position Players)
Career: Kory Sheets - 324
Season: Leroy Keyes - 114 (1919)
Game: Elmer Oliphant - 43 vs. Rose Poly (1912)
  • All-Purpose Yards
Career: Dorien Bryant - 6,219 yards
Season: Dorien Bryant - 2,121 yards (2007)
Game: Otis Armstrong vs. Indiana - 312 yards (1972)

Passing[edit]

  • Passing Yards
Career: Drew Brees - 11,792
Season: Curtis Painter - 3,985 (2006)
Game: Curtis Painter - 546 vs. Central Michigan (2007)
  • Pass Completions
Career: Drew Brees - 1,026
Season: Drew Brees - 361 (1998)
Game: Drew Brees - 55 vs. 1998 (1998)
  • Pass Attempts
Career: Drew Brees - 1,678
Season: Drew Brees (1998) & Curtis Painter (2007) - 569
Game: Drew Brees - 83 vs. Wisconsin (1998)#[87]
  • Completion Percentage
Career: Drew Brees - 61.1%
Season (minimum 150 attempts): Mark Herrmann - 65.8% (1980)
Game (minimum 20–29 completions): Kyle Orton - 88.5% vs. Ball State (2004)
Game (minimum 30–39 completions): Drew Brees - 86.1% vs. Minnesota (1998)
Game (minimum 40–49 completions): Curtis Painter - 77.6% vs. Eastern Illinois (2007)
Game (minimum 50–59 completions): Drew Brees - 70.2% vs. Michigan State (1999)
Game (minimum 60+ completions): Drew Brees - 66.3% vs. Wisconsin (1998)
  • Touchdown Passes
Career: Drew Brees - 90
Season: Drew Brees - 39 (1998)
Game: Drew Brees (2× 1998), Kyle Orton (2004) & Curtis Painter (2007) - 6
  • Passing Efficiency
Career: Jim Everett - 132.7
Season (minimum 150 attempts): Kyle Orton - 151.1 (2004)
Game (minimum 20–29 completions): Kyle Orton - 258.2 vs. Ball State (2004)
Game (minimum 30–39 completions): Drew Brees - 262.9 vs. Minnesota (1998)
Game (minimum 40–49 completions): Curtis Painter - 177.6 vs. Eastern Illinois (2007)
Game (minimum 50–59 completions): Kyle Orton - 179.0 vs. Indiana (2004)
Game (minimum 60+ completions): Drew Brees - 131.6 vs. Georgia (2000)

Rushing[edit]

  • Rushing Yards
Career: Mike Alstott - 3,635
Season: Mike Alstott -1,436 (1995)
Game: Otis Armstrong - 276 vs. Indiana (1972)
  • Rushing Attempts
Career: Otis Armstrong - 670
Season: Joey Harris - 250 (2002)
Game: Scott Dierking (1976) & Montrell Lowe (2000) - 36
  • Rushing Touchdowns
Career: Kory Sheets - 48
Season: Tony Butkovich (1943) & Kory Sheets (2008) - 16
Game: Mike Northington - 5 vs. Iowa (1973)
  • 100-Yard Rushing Games
Career: Mike Alstott - 16
Season: Mike Alstott (1995) - 9

Receiving[edit]

  • Receiving Yards
Career: John Standeford - 3,788
Season: John Standeford - 1,307 (2002)
Game: Chris Daniels - 301 vs. Michigan State (1999)
  • Receptions:
Career: Taylor Stubblefield - 325
Season: Chris Daniels (1999) - 121
Game: Chris Daniels - 21 vs. Michigan State (1999)
  • Touchdown Receptions
Career: Brian Alford - 31
Season: Taylor Stubblefield - 16 (2004)
Game: Reggie Arnold - 4 vs. Iowa (1977)
  • 100-Yard Receiving Games
Career: John Standeford - 14
Season: Steve Griffin (1984) & John Standeford (2002) - 7

Defensive[edit]

  • Tackles
Career: Kevin Motts - 520
Season: Mark Brown - 209 (1982)
Game: Chuck Kyle - 27 vs. Indiana (1968)
  • Tackles For Loss
Career: Jeff Zgonina - 72.0
Season: Jeff Zgonina - 28 (1992)
Game: Jeff Zgonina (1992) & Rob Ninkovich (2005) - 7
  • Sacks
Career: Rosevelt Colvin - 35.0
Season: Rosevelt Colvin - 15.0 (1998)
Game: Ken Loushin,

Tom Kingsbury (1980), Rob Ninkovich (2004 & 2005) & Ryan Kerrigan (2010) - 4.0

  • Passes Broken Up
Career: Steve Jackson - 35
Season: Jamel Coleman - 20 (1996)
Game: Chuck Piebes (1971) & Bill Kay (1980) - 7
  • Interceptions
Career: Stuart Schweigert - 17
Season: Phil Mateja (1952) & Bill Kay (1979) - 7
Game: Paul Beery (1976) - 4

Kicking[edit]

  • Scoring
Career: Travis Dorsch - 355
Season: Ben Jones (2003) - 111
Game: E. C. Robertson - 35 vs. Rose Poly (1900)
  • Field Goals Made
Career: Travis Dorsch - 68
Season: Ben Jones - 25 (2003)
Game: E. C. Robertson - 7 vs. Rose Poly (1900)
Longest Made: Carson Wiggs - 59 yards vs. Toledo (2009)
  • Field Goals Attempted
Career: Travis Dorsch - 97
Season: Ben Jones - 30 (2003)
  • Field Goal Percentage
Career (15 min. attempts): Carson Wiggs - .737
Season (1 min. attempt): Ben Jones - .833 (2003)
Game (4 min. attempts): Scott Sovereen (1977), Rick Anderson (1980), Jonathan Briggs (1986), Travis Dorsch (2001), Ben Jones (2003), Chris Summers (2× 2007), & Carson Wiggs (2011) - 1.000

Punting[edit]

Career: Shawn McCarthy - 273
Season: Shawn McCarthy - 79 (1988)
Game: Scott Lougheed (1970) & Jared Armstrong (2007) - 12
Career: Shawn McCarthy - 11,246
Season: Brent Slaton - 3,303 (2003)
Game: Shawn McCarthy - 409 vs. Illinois (1989)
Career: Travis Dorsch - 48.5
Season: Travis Dorsch - 48.1 (2001)
Game: Cody Webster - 56.0 vs. Indiana (2010)

Kick Returns[edit]

Career: Dorien Bryant - 2,125
Season: Dorien Bryant - 1,007 (2007)
Game: Raheem Mostert - 206 vs. Wisconsin (2011)
Career: Raheem Mostert - 30.2
Game (4 min. attempts): Raheem Mostert - 41.2 vs. Wisconsin (2011)
Career: Dorien Bryant - 3
Season: Dorien Bryant - 2 (2007)

Punt Returns[edit]

Career: Anthony Chambers - 780
Season: Anthony Chambers - 499 (2003)
Game: Anthony Chambers - 149 vs. Penn State (2003)
Career: Phil Mateja - 12.0
Season: Vinny Sutherland - 16.4 (1999)
Game (4 min. attempts): Anthony Chambers - 29.8 vs. Penn State (2003)


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External links[edit]