Princess Beatrice of York

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Princess Beatrice
Princess Beatrice in 2012
Full name
Beatrice Elizabeth Mary[1]
HouseHouse of Windsor
FatherPrince Andrew, Duke of York
MotherSarah, Duchess of York
Born(1988-08-08) 8 August 1988 (age 24)
Portland Hospital, London
ReligionChurch of England
 
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Princess Beatrice
Princess Beatrice in 2012
Full name
Beatrice Elizabeth Mary[1]
HouseHouse of Windsor
FatherPrince Andrew, Duke of York
MotherSarah, Duchess of York
Born(1988-08-08) 8 August 1988 (age 24)
Portland Hospital, London
ReligionChurch of England
The Royal Family of the
United Kingdom
and the
other Commonwealth realms
Badge of the House of Windsor.svg

HM The Queen
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh


Princess Beatrice of York (Beatrice Elizabeth Mary; born 8 August 1988) is the elder daughter of Prince Andrew, Duke of York, and Sarah, Duchess of York. She is fifth, and the first female, in the line of succession to the thrones of the sixteen Commonwealth realms.

While studying at Goldsmiths, University of London, Princess Beatrice was not expected to undertake regular Royal duties, although she did make appearances at some Royal events; for instance, she and her sister, Princess Eugenie, represented their father at a service of thanksgiving for her aunt Diana, Princess of Wales, in 2007.

Contents

Early life

Beatrice was born on 8 August 1988 at 8:18 pm at the Portland Hospital, the first child of Prince Andrew, Duke of York, and Sarah, Duchess of York, and fifth grandchild of Elizabeth II and The Duke of Edinburgh. She is also a distant cousin of her late aunt Diana, Princess of Wales, whose father was John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer for Beatrice's mother Sarah, Duchess of York is a direct descendant of Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, daughter of John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer, (via Georgiana's illegitimate daughter Eliza Courtney). She was baptised in the Chapel Royal at St. James's Palace on 20 December 1988, her godparents being: Viscount Linley (her father's cousin); the Duchess of Roxburghe (now Lady Jane Dawnay); The Hon Mrs John Greenall; and Mrs Henry Cotterell.[2] She was named after The Princess Beatrice (youngest daughter of Queen Victoria), after Queen Mary (The Queen's grandmother) and after the Duchess' mother's second name.[3] As a male-line grandchild of the Sovereign, Beatrice was styled Her Royal Highness with the title Princess Beatrice of York.

Beatrice and her sister are the only granddaughters of The Queen to hold the title of Princess and the style Her Royal Highness by Letters Patent issued by King George V. Like all of the grandchildren of The Queen she is a descendent of the Tudor king Henry VII through his daughter Margaret and thus also descendents of the Stuart line through Margaret's great-grandson James VI of Scotland and I of England. Their cousin Lady Louise Windsor, although she could be formally titled Princess, is styled as the daughter of an Earl, at the request of her parents. Other cousins, Peter and Zara Phillips, are the children of Princess Anne; the title of Prince/Princess is not carried through the female line.

Education

Beatrice began her early education at the independent Upton House School in Windsor, in 1991. From there, she and her sister both attended the independent Coworth Park School from 1995. Beatrice continued her education at the independent St. George's School in Ascot, where she was a pupil from 2000 to 2007. Having been diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, she delayed sitting her GCSE exams for one year. She remained at St. George's to take her A-Levels, gaining a grade A in drama, and B grades in history and film studies.[4] She was elected Head Girl in her final year.[5]

In September 2008, Beatrice began studying History at Goldsmiths, University of London.,[6] and graduated in 2011 with a 2:1 degree (BA) in History and History of Ideas.[7]

Personal interests

In an interview to mark her 18th birthday, Beatrice said that she wanted to use her position to assist others through charity work; she had already undertaken charitable duties alongside her mother through the various organisations the Duchess supported. In 2002, Beatrice visited HIV-infected children in Russia, and, in Britain, she supported Springboard for Children (a literacy project for primary-school children with learning difficulties) and the Teenage Cancer Trust. During the summer of 2008, Beatrice volunteered as a sales clerk at Selfridges, and it was reported Beatrice and a friend have plans to found a fashion label.[8] In April 2010, running to raise money for Children in Crisis, she became the first member of the Royal Family to complete the London Marathon.[9]

Beatrice has also been involved in the film industry, becoming the first member of the Royal Family to appear in a non-documentary film when she made a brief non-speaking appearance as an "extra" in The Young Victoria (2009), based around the accession and Coronation of Beatrice's fourth-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria. Beatrice had a minor, non-speaking role in a number of scenes.[10]

Official duties

Princess Beatrice with her father and sister being driven away from St Paul's Cathedral following the Diamond Jubilee Thanksgiving Service, 5 June 2012.

Beatrice has been present at a number of official Royal occasions, such as Trooping the Colour in London, and The Queen's 80th birthday. She and her sister were also guests at the Concert for Diana, in memory of their late aunt organised by their cousins, Princes William and Harry. Both princesses attended the service of thanksgiving for Diana on 1 September 2007, representing their father, who was on an official visit to Malaysia. Beatrice was present at the wedding of her cousin Peter Phillips to Autumn Kelly in 2008, and the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton. At the wedding, Beatrice's hat designed by Philip Treacy was remarked upon by some as an odd choice of fashion. Nonetheless, in May 2011, the hat was offered for sale on the internet auction site eBay with the proceeds going to charity:[11] it was sold for £81,000 ($123,325), with the money split between Unicef and Children in Crisis.[12] A few months later Princess Beatrice was seen at the wedding of her cousin Zara Phillips to Rugby player Mike Tindall.

Princess Beatrice performed her highest profile royal duties to date when she accompanied her grandmother the Queen to the traditional Royal Maundy services on April 5, 2012. Other than the Duke of Edinburgh, she was the sole member of the Royal Family to attend the Maundy Thursday services at York Minster with the Queen. There, Beatrice interacted with parishioners, received flowers from the public, and assisted the Queen as she passed out the official Maundy money to the pensioners. [13] In the lead up to the 2012 Summer Olympics Princess Beatrice welcomed the Olympic flame on the steps of Harewood House near Leeds[14]

Titles, styles, honours and arms

Titles and styles

Royal styles of
Princess Beatrice of York
Arms of Beatrice of York.svg
Reference styleHer Royal Highness
Spoken styleYour Royal Highness
Alternative styleMa'am

The Princess's style and title in full: Her Royal Highness Princess Beatrice Elizabeth Mary of York. As a British Princess, Beatrice has no official surname; however, she uses the name of the area over which her father holds title, i.e. York (as Prince Harry uses Wales, per his father, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales).

Arms

Ancestry

References

  1. ^ As a titled royal, Beatrice holds no surname, but, when one is used, it is Mountbatten-Windsor (or her father's territorial designation, York).
  2. ^ Yvonne's Royalty Home Page – Royal Christenings
  3. ^ Biography of Beatrice of York
  4. ^ "Princess Beatrice 'ecstatic' after passing A-levels". Daily Mail. 17 August 2007. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-475899/Princess-Beatrice-ecstatic-passing-A-levels.html.
  5. ^ "The Royalist > Princess Beatrice Celebrates An Election Win". The Royalist. http://www.theroyalist.net/content/view/728/2/. Retrieved 26 October 2008.
  6. ^ Aislinn Simpson (30 June 2009). "Palace officials spent £250,000 renovating Princess Beatrice apartment". The Daily Telegraph (UK). http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/theroyalfamily/5694425/Palace-officials-spent-250000-renovating-Princess-Beatrice-apartment.html. Retrieved 30 June 2009.
  7. ^ "mirror.co.uk". http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/07/01/princess-beatrice-receives-2-1-in-her-history-degree-115875-23241013/.
  8. ^ Nicholl, Katie (8 September 2007). "Princess Bea the style queen... she can't get it from Mum!". Daily Mail. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=480726&in_page_id=1773.
  9. ^ Matthew Moore (25 April 2010). "Princess Beatrice becomes first royal to complete London Marathon". Telegraph.co.uk. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/theroyalfamily/7632312/Princess-Beatrice-becomes-first-royal-to-complete-London-Marathon.html.
  10. ^ Bamigboye, Baz (28 September 2007). "Princess Beatrice to appear in film about Victoria's royal ascent". Daily Mail. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=482973&in_page_id=1773#StartComments.
  11. ^ Newscore (11 May 2011). Princess Beatrice's ridiculed wedding hat to be sold on eBay. New York Post
  12. ^ "Princess Beatrice's hat worn at the royal wedding sells for $123,325". Herald Sun (Australia). 22 May 2011. http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/special-reports/princess-beatrices-hat-worn-at-the-royal-wedding-sells-for-123325/story-fn888sz0-1226060861829. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  13. ^ "Princess Beatrice helps queen with Maundy Thursday tradition". CBS News (United States). 5 April 2012. http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-31749_162-57410121-10391698/princess-beatrice-helps-queen-with-maundy-thursday-tradition/. Retrieved 8 April 2012.
  14. ^ http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=444078168947352&set=a.444078162280686.99554.151274568227715&type=1&theater

External links

Princess Beatrice of York
Born: 8 August 1988
British royalty
Preceded by
The Duke of York
Line of succession to the British Throne
5th position
Succeeded by
Princess Eugenie of York
Orders of precedence in the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Autumn Phillips
Ladies
HRH Princess Beatrice of York
Succeeded by
Princess Eugenie of York