Preston Nibley

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Preston Nibley
Preston Nibley.jpg
Nibley, ca. 1920
Personal details
Born(1884-05-26)May 26, 1884
Logan, Utah Territory, United States
DiedJanuary 2, 1966(1966-01-02) (aged 81)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Resting placeLogan City Cemetery
41°44′55″N 111°48′16″W / 41.7485°N 111.8045°W / 41.7485; -111.8045
 
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Preston Nibley
Preston Nibley.jpg
Nibley, ca. 1920
Personal details
Born(1884-05-26)May 26, 1884
Logan, Utah Territory, United States
DiedJanuary 2, 1966(1966-01-02) (aged 81)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Resting placeLogan City Cemetery
41°44′55″N 111°48′16″W / 41.7485°N 111.8045°W / 41.7485; -111.8045

Preston Nibley (May 26, 1884 – January 2, 1966)[1][2] was an American religious leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and wrote several books on the church, including several pieces of devotional literature.

Biography[edit]

Nibley was a son of Charles W. Nibley and one of his wives, the former Ellen Ricks. Nibley was born in Logan, Utah Territory.[3] From 1903 to 1906 he served as a LDS Church missionary in the German Empire, including eighteen months as president of the Berlin Conference.

Nibley accompanied Joseph F. Smith on his 1906 trip to Nauvoo, Illinois, where Smith told him of having seen one of the Joseph Smith Papyri rolled out in the Mansion House.

From 1906 to 1907, Nibley was a student at the University of Chicago. He then returned to Logan, Utah, and in 1908 he married Anna Parkinson, with whom he had three children.[3] They moved to Salt Lake City in 1911, where he became involved in real estate and manufacturing.[3]

Nibley served as corresponding secretary of the Utah State Historical Society around 1920.[3]

Church service[edit]

In 1919, Nibley was appointed as a member of the general board of the church's Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association.[3]

From 1937 to 1940, Nibley served as president of the Northwestern States Mission. Shortly after becoming mission president in 1937, he counseled LDS Church members in Eugene, Oregon to begin building a chapel. Nibley was succeeded as mission president by Nicholas G. Smith.

During 1957 to 1963, Nibley served as an Assistant Church Historian under Joseph Fielding Smith.[4]

Published work[edit]

Nibley wrote Brigham Young: The Man and His Work (originally published in 1936), as well as a collection of stories on the presidents of the LDS Church and a collection of missionary experiences. He also edited and published an edition of Lucy Mack Smith's History of Joseph Smith.

Among many other works, Nibley compiled some of the writings and sermons of George Albert Smith which were then published under the title Sharing the Gospel with Others.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Preston Nibley, 81, dies". Deseret News. January 3, 1966. p. B11. Retrieved 2010-03-14. 
  2. ^ "Preston Nibley". Deseret News. January 4, 1966. p. A-10. Retrieved 2010-03-14. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Jenson, Andrew (1920). Latter-day Saint biographical encyclopedia: A compilation of biographical sketches of prominent men and women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 3. Salt Lake City, Utah: The Andrew Jenson History Company (Printed by Printed by The Arrow Press). p. 686. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  4. ^ Arrington, Leonard J. (Summer 1968). "The Search for Truth and Meaning in Mormon History". Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 3 (2): 66. Retrieved 2009-02-23. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]