Pop Muzik

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"Pop Muzik"
Single by M
from the album New York • London • Paris • Munich
B-side"M Factor"
Released25 March 1979 (UK)
20 July 1979 (US)
Format7", 12"
GenreNew wave,[1] synthpop,[2] disco
Length3:21
LabelMCA / EMI / Sire
Writer(s)Robin Scott
Producer(s)Robin Scott
M singles chronology
"Moderne Man"
(1979)
"Pop Muzik"
(1979)
"Moonlight and Muzak"
(1979)
 
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"Pop Muzik"
Single by M
from the album New York • London • Paris • Munich
B-side"M Factor"
Released25 March 1979 (UK)
20 July 1979 (US)
Format7", 12"
GenreNew wave,[1] synthpop,[2] disco
Length3:21
LabelMCA / EMI / Sire
Writer(s)Robin Scott
Producer(s)Robin Scott
M singles chronology
"Moderne Man"
(1979)
"Pop Muzik"
(1979)
"Moonlight and Muzak"
(1979)

"Pop Muzik" is a 1979 hit song by M, a project by Robin Scott.

Concept and chart performance[edit]

Robin Scott describes the genesis of "Pop Muzik" this way:

I was looking to make a fusion of various styles which somehow would summarise the last 25 years of pop music. It was a deliberate point I was trying to make. Whereas rock and roll had created a generation gap, disco was bringing people together on an enormous scale. That's why I really wanted to make a simple, bland statement, which was, 'All we're talking about basically (is) pop music.[3]

The single was released in the UK first, peaking at number two on 12 May 1979, unable to break Art Garfunkel's 6-week stint at number one with "Bright Eyes". In August of that same year, it was released in North America, where it eventually climbed all the way to number one in Canada on 27 October[4] and in the US on 3 November.

Along with Scott, other musicians who played on the track were his brother Julian Scott (on bass), then unknown keyboardist Wally Badarou, Canadian synthesiser programmer John Lewis (who died of AIDS in 1985) and Brigit Novik, the backing vocalist.

The single was bolstered by a promotional video that was well received. The clip featured Scott as a DJ singing into a microphone from behind an exaggerated turntable setup, at times flanked by two female models who sang and danced in a robotic manner. One of the sight gags in the video depicted Brigit Novik dressed in blue who actually recorded the backup vocals which are then mimed by the models.

The single's B-side, "M Factor", was featured in two different versions. The original cut appeared on the first UK and European releases of the single, while a slightly remixed version appeared on the single released in the United States and Canada.

The image of the baby on "Pop Muzik"'s single disc pictures Robin Scott's daughter, named Berenice, who is now a singer and piano/keyboard player and composer and involved with his father's friend Phil Gould and Wally Badarou projects.[citation needed]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1979–1980)Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[5]1
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[6]2
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[7]3
Belgium (VRT Top 30 Flanders)[8]3
Canada (CHUM)[9]8
Canada (RPM 100 Singles)[4]1
Canada (RPM Adult Oriented Playlist)[10]19
Canada (RPM Disco Playlist)[11]1
Denmark (IFPI)[12]1
Europe (Eurochart Hot 100)[13]1
France (IFOP)[14]12
Germany (Media Control AG)[15]1
Ireland (IRMA)[16]2
Italy (FIMI)[17]5
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40)[18]3
Netherlands (Mega Single Top 100)[19]3
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[20]3
Norway (VG-lista)[21]5
South Africa (Springbok Radio)[22]1
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[23]1
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[24]1
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[25]2
US Billboard Hot 100[26]1
US Cash Box[27]4
US Record World[28]4

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1979)Position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[29]10
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[30]6
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[31]28
Canada (RPM Top 200 Singles)[32]21
France (IFOP)[33]39
Italy (FIMI)[17]18
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40)[34]28
Netherlands (Mega Single Top 100)[35]29
South Africa (Springbok Radio)[36]5
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[37]13
US Cash Box[38]15
Chart (1980)Position
US Billboard Hot 100[39]40

Certifications and sales[edit]

RegionCertificationSales/shipments
Germany (BVMI)[40]Gold250,000^
United States (RIAA)[41]Gold1,000,000^

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone
xunspecified figures based on certification alone

Order of precedence
Preceded by
"Hot Stuff" by Donna Summer
Australian number-one single
9 July 1979 – 23 July 1979 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Some Girls" by Racey
Swiss number-one single
1 July 1979 – 15 July 1979 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Gloria" by Umberto Tozzi
Preceded by
"Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)"
by Robert Palmer
Canadian RPM number-one single
27 October 1979 – 3 November 1979 (2 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Good Girls Don't" by The Knack
Preceded by
"Lead Me On" by Maxine Nightingale
Canadian RPM Disco Playlist number-one single
27 October 1979 – 3 November 1979 (2 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Rise" by Herb Alpert
Preceded by
"Does Your Mother Know" by ABBA
Eurochart Hot 100 number-one single
5 July 1979 – 2 August 1979 (5 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Ring My Bell" by Anita Ward
Preceded by
"Born to Be Alive" by Patrick Hernandez
German number-one single
18 June 1979 – 23 July 1979 (6 weeks)
Succeeded by
"So Bist Du" by Peter Maffay
Preceded by
"My Love" by Joe Dolan
South African number-one single
5 October 1979 – 19 October 1979 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Fire" by The Pointer Sisters
Preceded by
"Hallelujah" by Milk and Honey
Swedish number-one single
13 July 1979 (1 week)
Succeeded by
"Born to Be Alive" by Patrick Hernandez
Preceded by
"Rise" by Herb Alpert
US Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
3 November 1979 (1 week)
Succeeded by
"Heartache Tonight" by The Eagles

Album[edit]

The subsequent full-length album New York • London • Paris • Munich was recorded in Montreux, Switzerland, at Queen's Mountain Studio, using their regular engineer David Richards, as well as Julian Scott, Wally Badarou (who would later work with Level 42 and Compass Point All Stars, among others) and Brigit Novik. Additional musicians on the album included drummer Phil Gould (later of Level 42), Gary Barnacle on saxophone and flute and (at the time) local Montreux resident David Bowie, who did occasional handclaps. The album was also released in the US on Sire Records (with a different track listing / order) but it was not a commercial success.

Other formats[edit]

The UK 12-inch single version was notable for the A-side having a double groove such that the two tracks ("Pop Muzik" and "M Factor") both started at the outer edge of the record and finished in the middle (with a long silence at the end of "M Factor" since the track was the shorter of the two). This resulted in a random selection of the two tracks, depending on which groove the needle landed in the lead-in. To further market this idea, the UK record sleeve stated "B side included on A side, full length disco mix of Pop Musik on Seaside". 'Seaside' (in other words "C side") was a simple play on words as the letter C, apart from being the logical next "side" after the A and B sides, is pronounced the same way as the English word "sea", and "seaside" means "beside the sea".

Cover versions[edit]

"Pop Muzik"
Single by All Systems Go
Format7" and 12" vinyl
GenreMale vocal, instrumental, pop
LabelUnique Records

Track listings[edit]

Original 7" single[edit]

Original 7" single released by MCA Records and EMI in Europe.

  1. Pop Muzik — 3:21
  2. M Factor — 2:30

Long version single[edit]

Single released as a 7" vinyl in the United States by Sire Records, and as a 12" vinyl in France by Pathé Marconi EMI, both featuring a longer version of the song

  1. Pop Muzik (Long Version) — 4:58
  2. M Factor — 2:30

Netherlands 12" single[edit]

12" single released in the Netherlands by MCA Records. The B-side "M Factor" was featured on the A-side of the vinyl on this release, with a remix of the title song on the B-side.

  1. Pop Muzik
  2. M Factor
  3. Pop Muzik (Long Version)

Sweden 7" 1989 release[edit]

7" single released in Sweden in 1989 by Freestyle Records

  1. Pop Muzik (Edited 1989 Remix) — 3:10
  2. Pop Muzik (Original 7" Version) — 3:20

Sweden 12" 1989 release[edit]

12" single released in Sweden in 1989 by Freestyle Records

  1. Pop Muzik (Extended 1989 Hip Hop Remix) — 5:40
  2. Pop Muzik (7" Version) — 3:20
  3. Pop Muzik (Edited 1989 Dub Remix) — 3:20
  4. Pop Muzik (Original 12" Version) — 5:00
  5. Pop Muzik (Edited 1989 Remix) — 3:10

Germany 12" 1989 release[edit]

12" single released in Germany in 1989 by ZYX Records

  1. Pop Muzik (The Hip Hop Club Remix) — 5:38
  2. Pop Muzik (The Hip Hop Remix) — 3:20
  3. Pop Muzik (Original '79 Mix) — 3:21

Germany CD 2001 release[edit]

CD single released in Germany in 2001 by ZYX Records

  1. Pop Muzik (Britannia '89 Remix) — 3:11
  2. Pop Muzik (Cabinet Remix) — 7:38
  3. Pop Muzik (Original Version) — 3:21

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eric Weisbard, Craig Marks (1995). Spin Alternative Record Guide. Vintage Books. ISBN 978-06-7975-574-6. ""Pop Muzik" split new wave apart from punk for good." 
  2. ^ Chiu, David (4 July 2013). "A look back at 1983: The year of the second British Invasion". CBS News. Retrieved 23 July 2013. "Synthpop made inroads in America starting in the late '70s with songs like "Pop Muzik" by M, "Video Killed the Radio Star," by the Buggles, and "Cars" by Gary Numan." 
  3. ^ ""Pop Muzik" – M". Fred Bronson. Superseventies.com. 1988. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Top Singles – Volume 32, No. 5, October 27 1979". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "Australia n°1 Hits – 70's". Worldcharts.co.uk. Retrieved 10 June 2013. 
  6. ^ "M – Pop Muzik – Austriancharts.at" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  7. ^ "Ultratop.be – M – Pop Muzik" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  8. ^ "Popmuzik – M". VRT (in Dutch). Top30-2.radio2.be. Retrieved 26 July 2013. "Hoogste notering in de top 30 : 3" 
  9. ^ "CHART NUMBER 1187 – Saturday, October 13, 1979". CHUM. Archived from the original on 12 February 2006. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Adult Contemporary – Volume 32, No. 7, November 10 1979". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  11. ^ "Dance/Urban – Volume 32, No. 5, October 27 1979". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  12. ^ "Billboard – Hits Of The World". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media) 91 (43): 80. 27 October 1979. ISSN 0006-2510.  See last week peak position
  13. ^ "Songs from the Year 1979". Tsort.info. Steve Hawtin et al. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  14. ^ (French) "InfoDisc : Tous les Titres par Artiste". Dominic DURAND / InfoDisc. InfoDisc.fr. 23 July 2013. Retrieved 23 July 2013.  Select "M" or "M." from the artist drop-down menu
  15. ^ "M - Pop Muzik". Charts.de. Media Control. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  16. ^ "The Irish Charts – All there is to know". IRMA. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  17. ^ a b (Italian) "I singoli più venduti del 1979". HitParadeItalia. Creative Commons. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – M - Pop Muzik search results" (in Dutch) Dutch Top 40. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  19. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – M – Pop Muzik" (in Dutch). Mega Single Top 100. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  20. ^ "Charts.org.nz – M – Pop Muzik". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  21. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – M – Pop Muzik". VG-lista. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  22. ^ "South African Rock Lists Website SA Charts 1969 – 1989 Acts (M)". Rock.co.za. John Samson. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  23. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – M – Pop Muzik". Singles Top 60. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  24. ^ "M – Pop Muzik – swisscharts.com". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  25. ^ "Archive Chart" UK Singles Chart. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  26. ^ "M – Awards". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  27. ^ "CASH BOX Top 100 Singles – Week ending OCTOBER 27, 1979". Cash Box magazine. Archived from the original on 4 September 2011. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  28. ^ "RECORD WORLD 1979". Geocities.com. Record World. Archived from the original on 11 May 2005. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  29. ^ BigKev. "Forum - ARIA Charts: Special Occasion Charts – Top 100 End of Year AMR Charts – 1970s". Australian-charts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  30. ^ (German) "Jahreshitparade 1979". Austriancharts.at. Hung Medien. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  31. ^ "Jaaroverzichten 1979" (in Dutch). ULTRATOP & Hung Medien / hitparade.ch. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  32. ^ "Top Singles – Volume 32, No. 13, December 22 1979". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  33. ^ (French) "TOP – 1979". Top-france.fr. Fabrice Ferment. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  34. ^ "Single Top 100 – 1979" (PDF) (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  35. ^ "Jaaroverzichten – Single 1979" (in Dutch). Hung Medien / hitparade.ch. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  36. ^ "Top 20 Hit Singles of 1979". Rock.co.za. John Samson. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  37. ^ (German) "Schweizer Jahreshitparade 1979". Hitparade.ch. Hung Medien. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  38. ^ "The CASH BOX Year-End Charts: 1979". Cash Box magazine. Archived from the original on 25 August 2012. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  39. ^ "Billboard Top 100 – 1980". The Longbored Surfer. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  40. ^ "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank ('Pop Muzik')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  41. ^ "American single certifications – M – Pop Muzik". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 31 January 2014.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH
  42. ^ Tim Rice, Johnathan Rice, Paul Gambaccini (1990), Guinness Book of British Hit Singles & Albums, Enfield, Middlesex: Guinness World Records and Guinness Publishing, ISBN 0-85112-398-8 
  43. ^ 01 – U2 – Pop Muzik (Intro) (Live from Mexico City) – with original audio. YouTube. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  44. ^ Griffith, JT. "U2 – Last Night on Earth". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  45. ^ Pop Muzik – Night at the Roxbury – Not 10 hours. YouTube. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 

External links[edit]