Please Come to Boston

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

"Please Come to Boston"
Single by Dave Loggins
from the album Apprentice (In a Musical Workshop)
ReleasedMay 6, 1974
Format7" (45 rpm)
GenrePop, Country
Length3:57
LabelEpic
Writer(s)Dave Loggins
ProducerJerry Crutchfield
Dave Loggins singles chronology
"Think'n of You"
(1973)
"Please Come to Boston"
(1974)
"Someday"
(1974)
Arranged and Re-Produced by Glen Spreen, Post Jerry Crutchfield and before it was released
 
Jump to: navigation, search
"Please Come to Boston"
Single by Dave Loggins
from the album Apprentice (In a Musical Workshop)
ReleasedMay 6, 1974
Format7" (45 rpm)
GenrePop, Country
Length3:57
LabelEpic
Writer(s)Dave Loggins
ProducerJerry Crutchfield
Dave Loggins singles chronology
"Think'n of You"
(1973)
"Please Come to Boston"
(1974)
"Someday"
(1974)
Arranged and Re-Produced by Glen Spreen, Post Jerry Crutchfield and before it was released

"Please Come to Boston" is the title of a song written and recorded by American singer-songwriter Dave Loggins. It was released in May 1974 as the first single from his album Apprentice (In a Musical Workshop) and was produced by Jerry Crutchfield. It spent two weeks at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in August 1974;[1] it spent one week atop the Billboard easy listening chart.[2] It was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category Best Male Pop Vocal performance.[2]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1974)Peak
position
Canadian RPM Top Singles4
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks2
U.S. Billboard Hot 1005
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks1

Covers[edit]

The song has been covered numerous times, most notably by country music singer David Allan Coe and folk singer Joan Baez, who actually began her career in the Boston-Cambridge area and included the song on her 1976 live album From Every Stage. Other notable artists to have covered the song include Tammy Wynette, Willie Nelson, Babyface, Tori Amos, Andrew WK, Kenny Chesney, Wade Bowen, Jackopierce, Reba McEntire, Jimmy Buffett, and Confederate Railroad.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits, 8th Edition (Billboard Publications)
  2. ^ a b Hyatt, Wesley (1999). The Billboard Book of #1 Adult Contemporary Hits (Billboard Publications)