Places in the Heart

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Places in the Heart
Places in the Heart (1984), poster.jpg
Directed byRobert Benton
Produced byArlene Donovan
Written byRobert Benton
StarringSally Field
Lindsay Crouse
Danny Glover
John Malkovich
Ed Harris
Amy Madigan
Music byJohn Kander
CinematographyNéstor Almendros
Editing byCarol Littleton
Distributed byTriStar Pictures
Release datesSeptember 21, 1984
Running time111 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$9.5 million
Box office$34,901,614
 
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Places in the Heart
Places in the Heart (1984), poster.jpg
Directed byRobert Benton
Produced byArlene Donovan
Written byRobert Benton
StarringSally Field
Lindsay Crouse
Danny Glover
John Malkovich
Ed Harris
Amy Madigan
Music byJohn Kander
CinematographyNéstor Almendros
Editing byCarol Littleton
Distributed byTriStar Pictures
Release datesSeptember 21, 1984
Running time111 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$9.5 million
Box office$34,901,614

Places in the Heart is a 1984 drama film that tells the story of a Texas widow who tries to keep her farm together with the help of a blind white man and a black man during the Great Depression. It stars Sally Field, Lindsay Crouse, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, John Malkovich, Danny Glover, and Terry O'Quinn.

The film was written and directed by Robert Benton and filmed in Waxahachie, near Dallas, Texas.

Cast[edit]

Plot summary[edit]

Places in the Heart opens in Waxahachie, Texas in 1935. Sheriff Royce Spalding leaves dinner with his wife and children to investigate gunshots. At the railway yards a young black boy, Wylie accidentally kills Spalding. Later, Wylie is dragged down the streets by trucks of white vigilantes in view of Edna and her two small children Frank and Possum. Edna’s sister Margaret (Lindsay Crouse), and her husband Wayne (Ed Harris) and run the men off. In the aftermath, Edna is in a daze over her husband's death.

Moze (Danny Glover), a black drifter and handy-man, asks Edna to hire him. When she refuses, he pockets some of her silver spoons. Later, the banker arrives at the house and notes that Edna will soon owe the bank $240 and offers to help sell her house. She rejects his offer to avoid splitting up her family. That night, Moze appears at the door in custody, caught with the stolen silver. Edna covers for him, and after gathering information from Moze about growing and marketing cotton she hires him.

The banker negotiates with Edna to take in his brother-in-law, Will (John Malkovich), who has been blinded in the war, as a boarder. Across town Edna’s brother-in-law Wayne returns home to his wife from his affair with the local schoolteacher, Viola (Amy Madigan).

As the end of the growing season nears, cotton prices drop to 3.5 cents a pound and there is no chance of cotton prices increasing again. Edna hopes to win the Ellis County prize of $100 for the first bale of cotton brought in to the gin. Meanwhile, Viola and Buddy Kelsey announce that they are leaving Waxahachie for Houston. Margaret, convinced of Wayne's infidelity, tells him she's leaving him.

Back on the cotton farm the family discusses the lack of progress in picking the crop. Edna orders him to hire extra pickers, but can pay them only if they win the prize for the first bale. Everyone in the family, including Will, pitch in to help get the crop in on time. Arriving first at the cotton merchant, Edna drives a hard bargain and gets her price for her cotton. That night Moze is accosted by Klan members, but is rescued by Will. Reluctantly, Moze packs up and moves on. Viola and her husband depart for Houston.

The movie ends, as it began, in church. Wayne passes communion to Margaret and it's passed from character to character from the movie, both living and dead. The last words are “Peace of God” spoken by the black boy Wylie to the Sheriff he had accidentally killed.

Reception[edit]

It won Academy Awards for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Field) and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen. It was nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Malkovich), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Crouse), Best Costume Design, Best Director, and Best Picture.

In 1985, when Sally Field reached the lectern to accept her second Oscar (the first was for Norma Rae), she uttered the memorable (and much-mocked) line, "I can't deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!" It is often misremembered as, "You like me—you really like me!"

At the 35th Berlin International Film Festival, Robert Benton won the Silver Bear for Best Director.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Berlinale: 1985 Prize Winners". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 

External links[edit]