Pinocchio

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Pinocchio
The Adventures of Pinocchio character
Pinocchio.jpg
Original art by Enrico Mazzanti
First appearanceThe Adventures of Pinocchio
Created byItaly Carlo Collodi
Information
SpeciesPuppet/Human
GenderMale
FamilyMister Geppetto (father)
The Fairy with Turquoise Hair (mother)
NationalityItalian
 
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This article is about the original Carlo Collodi fictional character. For other uses, see Pinocchio (disambiguation).
Pinocchio
The Adventures of Pinocchio character
Pinocchio.jpg
Original art by Enrico Mazzanti
First appearanceThe Adventures of Pinocchio
Created byItaly Carlo Collodi
Information
SpeciesPuppet/Human
GenderMale
FamilyMister Geppetto (father)
The Fairy with Turquoise Hair (mother)
NationalityItalian

Pinocchio (/pɪˈnki/;[1] Italian: [piˈnɔkkjo]) is a fictional character and the protagonist of the children's novel The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883), by the Italian writer Carlo Collodi. Carved by a woodcarver named Geppetto in a small Italian village, he was created as a wooden puppet, but dreamed of becoming a real boy. He has also been used as a character who is prone to telling lies and fabricating stories for various reasons.[2] The story has appeared in many adaptations in other media. Pinocchio has been called an icon of modern culture, and one of the most reimagined characters in the pantheon of children's literature.[3]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Aspects of Pinocchio's character vary depending on the interpretation, although basic aspects such as his creation as a puppet by Geppetto and the size of his nose changing due to his lies or stress remain present across the various formats.[4]

Pinocchio is known for having a short nose that becomes longer when he is under stress (chapter 3), especially while lying. His clothes are made of flowered paper, his shoes are made of wood and his hat is made of bread (page 16 of Collodi's Le Avventure di Pinocchio). In this, the original tale, Pinocchio exhibits obnoxious, bratty, and selfish traits.

Literary analysis[edit]

Some literary analysts have described Pinocchio as an epic hero.[5] Like other Western literacy heroes, such as Gilgamesh and Odysseus, Pinocchio descends into hell. Pinocchio also experiences rebirth through metamorphosis, a motif found in fantasy or speculative literatures.

Popular culture[edit]

Pinocchio as seen in Walt Disney's Pinocchio.

Disney version[edit]

"Una probabile morte di Pinocchio", Walther Jervolino, oil on canvas

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ British English and American English: http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictionary.com/dictionary/pinocchio
  2. ^ Reardon, Sara (2013-06-07). "Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio: Why is the original Pinocchio subjected to such sadistic treatment?". Slate.com. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  3. ^ Children's Literature Review, "Pinocchio: Calro Collodi," 2007. http://www.encyclopedia.com/article-1G2-2697200012/pinocchio-carlo-collodi.html, Retrieved June 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Italian, It's All Greek to Me: Everything You Don't Know About Italian ... - Linda Falcone. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ Morrissey, Thomas J., and Richard Wunderlich. "Death and Rebirth in Pinocchio." Children's Literature 11 (1983): 64-75.

External links[edit]