Pinewood derby

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Pinewood derby
PinePetty43.jpg
OwnerBoy Scouts of America
CountryUnited States
DatesAnnual
Website
pinewoodderby.org
Scouting portal
 
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Pinewood derby
PinePetty43.jpg
OwnerBoy Scouts of America
CountryUnited States
DatesAnnual
Website
pinewoodderby.org
Scouting portal

The pinewood derby is a racing event for Cub Scouts in the Boy Scouts of America. Cub Scouts, with the help of parents, build their own cars from wood, usually from kits containing a block of pine, plastic wheels and metal axles. With the popularity of the pinewood derby, other organizations have developed similar events, and a small industry has developed to provide tracks, timers, scales, trophies, ribbons and other products. Similar Cub Scouting events include the raingutter regatta with boats and the space derby using rubber band powered rockets.

Origins[edit]

2013 Patch celebrating the 60th anniversary of the derby

The first pinewood derby was held on May 15, 1953 at the Scout House in Manhattan Beach, California by Cub Scout Pack 280C (the present Pack 713).  The concept was created by the Pack’s Cubmaster Don Murphy, and sponsored by the Management Club at North American Aviation.[1]

Murphy's son was too young to participate in the popular Soap Box Derby races, so he came up with the idea of racing miniature wood cars. The cars had the same gravity-powered concept as the full-size Soap Box Derby cars, but were much smaller and easier to build.

The pinewood derby had a sensational first year. The originator of the idea—Don Murphy and the Management Club of North American Aviation—sent out thousands of brochures to anyone who requested more information.  The idea spread rapidly, and competitions were held across the country, mainly with recreation departments and nonprofit organizations including the Los Angeles County Department of Recreation.  Of all that early enthusiasm, however, only the Boy Scouts of America made it part of an official program.[2][3] The National Director of Cub Scouting Service, O. W. (Bud) Bennett, wrote Murphy: “We believe you have an excellent idea, and we are most anxious to make your material available to the Cub Scouts of America.” Within the year, the Boy Scouts of America adopted the pinewood derby for use in all Cub Scout packs.

In its October 1954 issue, Boys' Life publicized the event and offered plans for the track and a car, which featured “four wheels, four nails, and three blocks of wood.”

Don Murphy continued to run the derby program through the Management Club until his retirement from North American Aviation in 1978.  He passed away in 2008.

In 2003, Pack 713 celebrated the 50th Pinewood Derby along with Packs 287, 759, 275, and former Cub Scouts from the 1953 Pack 280c.

In 1980, the design of the block was changed from a cutout block, consistent with a 1940s style front-engined Indy 500 car, to a solid block. The tires were also changed from narrow, hard plastic, to wider "slicks".[citation needed][4]

In May 2005, the Boy Scouts of America registered Pinewood Derby as an official trademark.[5]

Construction[edit]

Official car kit

The Scout is given a block of wood made of pine, four plastic wheels and four nails. The finished car must use all nine pieces, must not exceed a certain weight (usually five ounces), must not exceed a certain length and must fit on the track used by that particular scout pack.

Blocks can be whittled with a hand knife or a bandsaw or Dremel carving tool for major shaping.[6] Decals can be bought at scout shops or hobby shops. It is also possible to use standard model decals to replicate actual racing cars such as Richard Petty's 1970 Plymouth Superbird, shown at right. The original style is based on open-wheel cars; however, fender or body kits are available, or wheels can simply be placed outboard of the body.

Other than the previous basic design rules, the Cub Scout is able to carve and decorate the car as he chooses. Many Cub Scouts also add weights to the final design to bring the car to the maximum allowable weight; coins, glue-in lead pieces, and melted lead are common ways to add weight. Cars typically vary from unfinished blocks to whimsical objects, to accurate replicas of actual cars.[7] Graphite is usually the only lubricant allowed, and it often helps to polish the provided nails.

The idea behind the pinewood derby is for the parent, usually the father, but occasionally the mother or grandparent, to spend time helping the child design, carve, paint, add weights, and tune the final car. However, it is often the case that the parent takes over the construction of the car, an aspect of the event that was lampooned in the 2005 film Down and Derby, and also in a 2009 episode of South Park. The quest for a fast car supports a cottage industry that supplies modified wheels, axles, and blocks as well as videos and instruction books. While a pinewood derby car kit costs around $4, a set of modified wheels and axles can sell for more than ten times that amount. Each pack sets its own rules under the guidelines set forth by the BSA[8] and their particular local district. The aftermarket items are legal under some Pack rules since the parts originally came from an official Boy Scouts of America (BSA) kit. Complete cars can be purchased on eBay and elsewhere for around $100 to $200.[9] Although these cars violate the spirit of the event, if not the rules, enforcement can be difficult.

Pinewood Derby Donahue 1972 AMC Matador

Model manufacturer Revell was licensed by the BSA to produce pinewood derby kits with a release in December 2009.[10]

Competition[edit]

Finish of a Pinewood Derby heat.

The track usually has two to six lanes and slopes down to the ground, since the cars are powered by gravity. Tracks may be owned by the pack or rented. The race is run in heats, giving every car the chance to run on each lane. The racers can be grouped with others from the same rank (Tiger Cubs, Wolf Cubs, Bear Cubs, etc.), or can compete against the pack as a whole.[11]

Car track

First, second, and third place winners usually receive ribbons, medals or trophies. Some packs also award on the basis of car design. The first place race winners get to advance to the district level, then each of the district-wide race winners get to race each other from across the entire council.[citation needed]

Other races[edit]

Pinewood derby cars ready to race

As the popularity of the pinewood derby grew, other organizations adopted the concept. Pinewood derby is a registered trademark of the BSA, so most use different names.[5] Each derby has slightly different rules for making and racing their cars.[12]

Car modifications[edit]

Stock wheels (left) and modified (one gram) wheels (right)

The forces affecting a pinewood derby car are gravity and inertia; the opposing forces are friction and air drag. Therefore, car modifications are aimed at maximizing the potential energy in the car design and minimizing the air drag and the friction that occurs when the wheel spins on the axle, contacts the axle head or car body, or contacts the track guide rail.[18] Friction due to air drag is a minor, although not insignificant, factor. The wheel tread can be sanded or turned on a lathe and the inner surface of the hub can be tapered to minimize the contact area between the hub and body. Polishing the wheel, especially the inner hub, with a plastic polish can also reduce friction. Often one front wheel is raised slightly so that it does not contact the track and add to the rolling resistance. Axles are filed or turned on a lathe to remove the burr and crimp marks and polished smooth. More extensive modifications involve tapering the axle head and cutting a notch to minimize the wheel-to-axle contact area. Note that packs can establish additional rules for what, if any, modifications are allowed. In some areas, no changes can be made to the axles or wheels.[18]

A second consideration is the rotational energy stored in the wheels. The pinewood derby car converts gravitational potential energy into translational kinetic energy (speed) plus rotational energy. Heavier wheels have a greater moment of inertia and their spinning takes away energy that would otherwise contribute to the speed of the car. A standard wheel has a mass of 2.6 g, but this can be reduced to as little as 1 g by removing material from the inside of the wheel. A raised wheel can reduce the rotational energy up to one-quarter, but this advantage is less with a bumpy track.[18]

Another consideration is the track itself. A track that is mostly sloped, with little flat at the end, can really allow cars with minimal mass in their wheels to shine. However, a track with a steep slope and then a long flat section can penalize such cars due to the quick loss of energy they experience once they have reached the bottom, when all potential energy has been transferred to kinetic and rotational energy. Such cars will take a lead on the downslope, but may be passed by cars with more energy "stored" away as rotational energy on the flat.[18]

A proper lubricant, typically graphite powder, is essential. Wheel alignment is important both to minimize wheel contact with the axle head and body as well as to limit the contact between the wheels and guide rail as the car travels down the track. The center of mass of a typical car is low and slightly ahead of the rear axle, which helps the car track straight as well as providing a slight advantage due to the additional gravitational potential energy.[19]

Legacy[edit]

A Cub Scout holds a winning pine car

The pinewood derby was selected as part of "America's 100 Best" in 2006 as "a celebrated rite of spring" by Reader's Digest.[20] The event has also been parodied by South Park in the episode, "Pinewood Derby," and the film, "Down and Derby."[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Pinewood Derby". National Scouting Museum. Archived from the original on 2008-02-04. Retrieved 2008-02-29. 
  2. ^ "The History of Pinewood Derby Car Racing". Pinewood Pro. Retrieved 2008-02-29. 
  3. ^ Bogert, John (July 9, 2008). "Scouts Honor — Memorial Set for Creator of the Pinewood Derby". Daily Breeze (Los Angeles Newspaper group). Retrieved 2008-07-11. 
  4. ^ http://www.maximum-velocity.com/pinewood_derby_times_v7_i13.htm
  5. ^ a b "Search of Trademark Application and Registration Retrieval system". U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Retrieved 2007-03-02. 
  6. ^ Dremel Pinewood Derby Days
  7. ^ Pinewood Derby Car Construction[unreliable source?]
  8. ^ "Cub Scout Pinewood Derby Pamphlet". 33721A. Boy Scouts of America. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  9. ^ "The Dark Side: eBay Cars". Pinewood Derby Times. Retrieved March 18, 2007. 
  10. ^ "Revell Pinewood Derby". Retrieved 2009-12-16. 
  11. ^ "Tips to get you started building a Pinewood Derby car track". ABC Pinewood Car. Retrieved 2013-02-11. 
  12. ^ "Pinewood Rules and More". ShapeNRace. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f "What Is a Shape N Race Derby?". Darin McGrew. Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Council Club or Independent Club". Calvinist Cadet Corps. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  15. ^ Craig, Jolene. (February 21, 2010). Girl Scouts get in on derby action. Parkersburg News and Sentinel (Parkersburg, WV).
  16. ^ http://www.pinewoodderbycars.com
  17. ^ Merchant, Nomaan (March 1, 2014). "Trail Life courts those who oppose Boy Scouts' acceptance of gays". Mercury News. Associated Press. Retrieved March 3, 2014. 
  18. ^ a b c d Cowley, E. Roger (November 1989). "Pinewood Derby Physics". The Physics Teacher (American Association of Physics Teachers) 27 (8): 610–612. doi:10.1119/1.2342889. 
  19. ^ "Five Keys to Pine Derby Performance". Maximum Velocity. Retrieved 2008-09-26. 
  20. ^ "Best Mother-Son Finish". Reader's Digest. 2006. Retrieved 2008-02-29. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Pinewood derby at Wikimedia Commons