Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio

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Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio
Township
Pierpont Township government building
Municipalities and townships of Ashtabula County
Coordinates: 41°45′29″N 80°34′46″W / 41.75806°N 80.57944°W / 41.75806; -80.57944Coordinates: 41°45′29″N 80°34′46″W / 41.75806°N 80.57944°W / 41.75806; -80.57944
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyAshtabula
Area
 • Total28.1 sq mi (72.7 km2)
 • Land28.1 sq mi (72.7 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation[1]991 ft (302 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total1,285
 • Density46/sq mi (17.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code44082
Area code(s)440
FIPS code39-62568[2]
GNIS feature ID1085737[1]
 
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Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio
Township
Pierpont Township government building
Municipalities and townships of Ashtabula County
Coordinates: 41°45′29″N 80°34′46″W / 41.75806°N 80.57944°W / 41.75806; -80.57944Coordinates: 41°45′29″N 80°34′46″W / 41.75806°N 80.57944°W / 41.75806; -80.57944
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyAshtabula
Area
 • Total28.1 sq mi (72.7 km2)
 • Land28.1 sq mi (72.7 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation[1]991 ft (302 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total1,285
 • Density46/sq mi (17.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code44082
Area code(s)440
FIPS code39-62568[2]
GNIS feature ID1085737[1]

Pierpont Township is one of the twenty-seven townships of Ashtabula County, Ohio, United States. The 2010 census found 1,285 people in the township.[3]

Geography[edit]

Located on the eastern edge of the county, it borders the following townships:

No municipalities are located in Pierpont Township, although the unincorporated community of Pierpont lies in the center of the township.

Government[edit]

The township is governed by a three-member board of trustees, who are elected in November of odd-numbered years to a four-year term beginning on the following January 1. Two are elected in the year after the presidential election and one is elected in the year before it. There is also an elected township fiscal officer,[4] who serves a four-year term beginning on April 1 of the year after the election, which is held in November of the year before the presidential election. Vacancies in the fiscal officership or on the board of trustees are filled by the remaining trustees. Currently, the board is composed of Leroy Hudson, Gaylord Miller (chair), and Robert Richcreek.[5]

History[edit]

Named for Pierpont Edwards,[5] it is the only Pierpont Township statewide.[6]

In 1790, at Buffalo, New York, the Seneca nation, represented by Joseph Brant, ceded their rights east of the Cuyahoga River to the Connecticut Land Company. The community was named after Pierpont Edwards, delegate to the Continental Congress and part owner of the Connecticut Land Company, who bought the land from Connecticut in 1795.

In 1798, Vermonter Edward Spear began settlement on lot 18 (on what was afterwards known as the "Beaver Meadows"), about two miles from the head of the east branch of the Ashtabula River. Spear erected the first log house in Pierpont Township (this building was burned by the Indians subsequent to his removal), and the next year (1799) raised the first crop of corn grown in the township. This was on the "Beaver Dam" and the surrounding meadows. Spear lived in this cabin until around 1801, when he took his departure. He was, however, during the early part of his sojourn in Pierpont, married, and fathered a child. This was the first white birth in the township. The date, sex, or subsequent history of this young pioneer is not known. In 1808, the first permanent settlers arrived in the township. They were Wareham Grant, Martin Vosburg, Harry Rockwell, and Ewins Wright. Grant and Vosburg erected their cabins about one mile north of the center. Rockwell built his cabin on lot 21, cleared a small piece of ground, sowed it to wheat, and in 1809, returned to Connecticut for his family.

The cabin of Wright was erected near the center of lot 17. In November 1811, Benjamin Matthews arrived from Washington, Massachusetts, and located temporarily near the cabin of Vosburg; he remained until the December following, when he moved into a cabin which he had in the meantime constructed.[7]

In the summer of 1811, Amos Huntley arrived, selected his land, and made a beginning on lot 42. In the fall he returned to Massachusetts for his family, with whom he arrived the next season. The next settlers were Asa Benjamin, Joseph Dewey, and Samuel Brown. During the summer of 1811, a number of gentlemen came on from Massachusetts, selected their land, and the following year (1812), with their families, occupied these lands, and began business in earnest. Among these settlers were Aaron H. Holmes, Asa Leonard, Shiron Turner, Jepthat Turner, Amos Remington, Abijah Whitton, Archibald Gould, Ezra Cole, Ezekiel Brayman, William Read, Eli Prince, Edson Beals, Ashel Cleveland, Reuben Benjamin, and Zebina Rawson.

Pierpont Township was organized in 1818.[8]

Pierpont in the Civil War[edit]

During the American Civil War, Captain Henry Hathaway raised a company of volunteers for the army and marched it to Browers Corners where he resigned the command to Captain Wilber Stevens, who marched it to Jefferson, its place of rendezvous. Soon after, he marched it into the Army, commanding Company B in the 29th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Pierpont township, Ashtabula County, Ohio". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved July 9, 2013. 
  4. ^ §503.24, §505.01, and §507.01 of the Ohio Revised Code. Accessed 4/30/2009.
  5. ^ a b Ashtabula County, Ohio Ashtabula County, 2007. Accessed 2007-05-28.
  6. ^ "Detailed map of Ohio" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved 2007-02-16. 
  7. ^ 1798-1878 History of Ashtabula County Ohio, by Williams Brothers
  8. ^ Kilbourn, John (1833). "The Ohio Gazetteer, or, a Topographical Dictionary". Scott and Wright. p. 372. Retrieved 12 December 2013. 

External links[edit]