Pickleball

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Highest governing bodyUSAPA
Nickname(s)Pickle"s Ball. Later changed to Pickleball
First played1965, Bainbridge Island, Washington
Characteristics
Categorizationracquet sport - Paddle Sport
EquipmentWiffle ball
Presence
Country or regionUnited States, Canada, India
Olympicno
Paralympicno
 
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Highest governing bodyUSAPA
Nickname(s)Pickle"s Ball. Later changed to Pickleball
First played1965, Bainbridge Island, Washington
Characteristics
Categorizationracquet sport - Paddle Sport
EquipmentWiffle ball
Presence
Country or regionUnited States, Canada, India
Olympicno
Paralympicno

Pickleball is a racquet sport which combines elements of badminton, tennis, and table tennis. [1]

Overview[edit]

Pickleball is a racket sport in which two to four players use solid paddles made of wood or composite materials to hit a polymer perforated ball over a net. The sport shares features of other racket sports, the dimensions and layout of a Badminton court, and a net and rules similar to tennis with a few modifications. One of the fastest growing sports in North America, Pickleball was invented in the mid 1960s as a children's backyard pastime but quickly became popular among adults as a game fun for players of all skill levels.

History[edit]

The game started during the summer of 1965 on Bainbridge Island, Washington, at the home of then State Representative Joel Pritchard who, in 1970, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for the State of Washington. He and two of his friends, Bill Bell and Barney McCallum, returned from golf and found their families bored one Saturday afternoon. They attempted to set up badminton, but no one could find the shuttlecock. They improvised with a Wiffle ball, lowered the badminton net, and fabricated paddles of plywood from a nearby shed.[2][3][4]

Although some sources claim that the name "Pickleball" was derived from that of the Pritchard family dog, Pickles, other sources state that the claim is false, and that the name came from the term "pickle boat", referring to the last boat to return with its catch.[2][4][5]

The court[edit]

court dimensions

The pickleball court is similar to a doubles badminton court. The actual size of the court is 20×44 feet for both doubles and singles. The net is hung at 36 inches on the ends, and 34 inches in the middle. The court is striped like a tennis court, with no alleys; but the outer courts, and not the inner courts, are divided in half by service lines. The inner courts are non-volley zones and extend 7 feet from the net on either side.[6]:11

Play[edit]

The ball is served underhand from behind the baseline, diagonally to the opponent’s service zone.

Points are scored by the serving side only and occur when the opponent faults (fails to return the ball, hits ball out of bounds, steps into the 'kitchen' area [the first seven feet from the net, also known as the non-volley zone] in the act of volleying the ball, etc.). A player may enter the non-volley zone to play a ball that bounces, and may stay there to play balls that bounce.[6]:A-22 The player must exit the non-volley zone before playing a volley. The first side scoring 11 points and leading by at least two points wins.[7]

The return of service must be allowed to bounce by the server (the server and partner in doubles play); i.e. cannot be volleyed. Consequently, the server or server and partner usually stay at the baseline until the first return has been hit back and bounced once.

In doubles play, at the start of the game, the serving side gets only one fault before their side is out, and the opponents begin their serve. After this, each side gets 2 faults (one with each team member serving) before their serve is finished. Thus, each side is always one serve ahead or behind, or tied.

In singles play, each side gets only one fault before a side out and the opponent then serves. The server's score will always be even (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10...) when serving from the right side, and odd (1, 3, 5, 7, 9...) when serving from the left side (singles play only).[6]:A-15

Terminology[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pritchard, Joan. "Pickle Ball feaatured on the Morning show". Newspaper column. The Parkersburg, WV News and Sentinel. Retrieved July 27, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b Joan Pritchard, "Origins of Pickleball", News and Sentinel, 27 July 2008
  3. ^ Pickleball Inc.: History. Retrieved 1 March 2014
  4. ^ a b Hoffman Estates Pickleball. Retrieved 1 March 2014
  5. ^ Pickle boat, at UrbanDictionary.com. Retrieved 1 March 2014
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Leach, Gale H.: The Art of Pickleball, Fourth Edition, Two Cats Press, 2011.
  7. ^ http://pickleball.com/pages/rules-how-to-play-the-game

External links[edit]