Filo

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Filo
Baklava.jpg
Baklava, made with filo pastry
Alternative namesFilo pastry, phyllo, fillo
TypePastry
Main ingredientsFlour dough
 
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Filo
Baklava.jpg
Baklava, made with filo pastry
Alternative namesFilo pastry, phyllo, fillo
TypePastry
Main ingredientsFlour dough

Filo, phyllo, or filo pastry (from the Greek: φύλλο 'leaf') is a laminated dough of paper-thin sheets of unleavened flour, separated by a thin film of butter.[1] It is used for making pastries in Middle Eastern and Balkan cuisines.

History[edit]

Main article: Baklava § History

The practice of stretching raw dough into paper-thin sheets probably evolved in the kitchens of the Topkapı Palace, based on Central Asian and/or Roman prototypes.[2][3]

Name[edit]

Filo pastry is a Ottoman invention, although the word (which means leaf) has entered English vocabulary through the Greek language.[4][1] The Turkish name yufka means to open a dough.[5] It also means a 'leaf'. Yufka may have been "an early form of filo" since the Diwan Lughat al-Turk, a dictionary of Turkic dialects by Mahmud Kashgari recorded plated/folded bread as one meaning of the word yuvgha,[citation needed] which is related to yufka, the modern Turkish name for filo as well as a Turkish flatbread.

Preparation[edit]

Prepared filo (also named kori) served with cheese in Bitola, Republic of Macedonia.

Filo dough is made with flour, water, and a small amount of oil and rakı or white vinegar, though some dessert recipes also call for egg yolks. Homemade filo takes time and skill, requiring progressive rolling and stretching to a single thin and very large sheet. A very big table and a long roller are used, with continual flouring between layers to prevent tearing.

Machines for producing filo pastry were perfected in the 1970s, which have come to dominate the market.[6] Filo for domestic use is widely available from supermarkets, fresh or frozen.

Uses[edit]

Filo can be used in many ways: layered, folded, rolled, or ruffled, with various fillings. Some notable common varieties are:

Other names[edit]

Filo is known by a variety of names in ethnic and regional cuisines. Among them are:

Other thin pastries[edit]

Very thin pastry sheets can also be made by touching lumps of dough to a hot surface, as in the North African malsouka or by cooking very thin batters, as in the South Indian pootharekulu.

Cooked puff pastry is similar to filo-based pastry, with multiple thin layers, but the layers are made by folding the dough, not by stacking thin sheets.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Alan Davidson (2014). The Oxford Companion to Food. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-967733-7. p. 307.
  2. ^ Perry, Charles. "The Taste for Layered Bread among the Nomadic Turks and the Central Asian Origins of Baklava", in A Taste of Thyme: Culinary Cultures of the Middle East (ed. Sami Zubaida, Richard Tapper), 1994. ISBN 1-86064-603-4
  3. ^ Patrick Faas (2003). Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 185.
  4. ^ Oxford Dictionaries.
  5. ^ http://www.nisanyansozluk.com/?k=Yufka&lnk=1
  6. ^ Press release from Athens Foods, Cleveland, OH

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]