Phosphatidate phosphatase

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phosphatidate phosphatase
Identifiers
EC number3.1.3.4
CAS number9025-77-8
Databases
IntEnzIntEnz view
BRENDABRENDA entry
ExPASyNiceZyme view
KEGGKEGG entry
MetaCycmetabolic pathway
PRIAMprofile
PDB structuresRCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene OntologyAmiGO / EGO
 
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phosphatidate phosphatase
Identifiers
EC number3.1.3.4
CAS number9025-77-8
Databases
IntEnzIntEnz view
BRENDABRENDA entry
ExPASyNiceZyme view
KEGGKEGG entry
MetaCycmetabolic pathway
PRIAMprofile
PDB structuresRCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene OntologyAmiGO / EGO

In enzymology, a phosphatidate phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction:[1]

a 3-sn-phosphatidate + H2O \rightleftharpoons a 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol + phosphate

Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are 3-sn-phosphatidate and H2O, whereas its two products are 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol and phosphate.

This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, specifically those acting on phosphoric monoester bonds. This enzyme participates in 4 metabolic pathways: glycerolipid, glycerophospholipid, ether lipid, and sphingolipid metabolism.

Nomenclature[edit]

The systematic name of this enzyme class is 3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase. Other names in common use include:

Types[edit]

There are several different genes that codify for phosphatidate phosphatases. They been classified in two groups (type I and type II) based on their cellular localization and substrate specificity.[2]

Type I[edit]

Type I phosphatidate phosphatases are soluble enzymes that can associate to membranes. There are found mainly in the cytosol and the nucleus. Codified by a group of genes named Lipin they are substrate specific only to phosphatidate. There are speculated to be involved in the de novo synthesis of glycerolipids.

Type II[edit]

Type II phosphatidate phospatases are transmembrane enzymes found mainly in the plasma membrane. They can also dephosphorylate other substrates beside phosphatidate therefore are also known as lipid-phosphate phosphatase. Their main role is in lipid signaling and in phospholipid head-group remodeling.

Genes[edit]

Human genes that encode phosphatidate phosphatases include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith SW, Weiss SB, Kennedy EP (October 1957). "The enzymatic dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acids". J. Biol. Chem. 228 (2): 915–22. PMID 13475370. 
  2. ^ Carman GM, Han GS (December 2006). "Roles of phosphatidate phosphatase enzymes in lipid metabolism". Trends Biochem. Sci. 31 (12): 694–9. doi:10.1016/j.tibs.2006.10.003. PMC 1769311. PMID 17079146. 
  3. ^ Han GS, Wu WI, Carman GM (April 2006). "The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lipin homolog is a Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase enzyme". J. Biol. Chem. 281 (14): 9210–8. doi:10.1074/jbc.M600425200. PMC 1424669. PMID 16467296. 
  4. ^ a b c Donkor J, Sariahmetoglu M, Dewald J, Brindley DN, Reue K (February 2007). "Three mammalian lipins act as phosphatidate phosphatases with distinct tissue expression patterns". J. Biol. Chem. 282 (6): 3450–7. doi:10.1074/jbc.M610745200. PMID 17158099.