Phillipsburg, New Jersey

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Phillipsburg, New Jersey
Town
Town of Phillipsburg
View of Phillipsburg, New Jersey and "Free Bridge" taken from park across Delaware River on Rt. 611 from Easton, PA.
View of Phillipsburg, New Jersey and "Free Bridge" taken from park across Delaware River on Rt. 611 from Easton, PA.
Map of Phillipsburg in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in New Jersey.
Map of Phillipsburg in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Philipsburg, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Philipsburg, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′31″N 75°10′44″W / 40.691974°N 75.179006°W / 40.691974; -75.179006Coordinates: 40°41′31″N 75°10′44″W / 40.691974°N 75.179006°W / 40.691974; -75.179006[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyWarren
IncorporatedMarch 8, 1861
Government[6]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • MayorHarry L. Wyant, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • AdministratorMichele D. Broubalow[4]
 • ClerkVictoria L. Kleiner (acting)[5]
Area[2][7]
 • Total3.311 sq mi (8.575 km2)
 • Land3.193 sq mi (8.270 km2)
 • Water0.118 sq mi (0.305 km2)  3.56%
Area rank322nd of 566 in state
19th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[8]299 ft (91 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total14,950
 • Estimate (2012[12])14,699
 • Rank168th of 566 in state
1st of 22 in county[13]
 • Density4,682.1/sq mi (1,807.8/km2)
 • Density rank118th of 566 in state
1st of 22 in county[13]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08865[14][15]
Area code(s)908 exchanges: 213, 387, 454, 859, 995[16]
FIPS code3404158350[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID0885350[19][2]
Websitephillipsburgnj.org
 
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Phillipsburg, New Jersey
Town
Town of Phillipsburg
View of Phillipsburg, New Jersey and "Free Bridge" taken from park across Delaware River on Rt. 611 from Easton, PA.
View of Phillipsburg, New Jersey and "Free Bridge" taken from park across Delaware River on Rt. 611 from Easton, PA.
Map of Phillipsburg in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in New Jersey.
Map of Phillipsburg in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Philipsburg, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Philipsburg, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′31″N 75°10′44″W / 40.691974°N 75.179006°W / 40.691974; -75.179006Coordinates: 40°41′31″N 75°10′44″W / 40.691974°N 75.179006°W / 40.691974; -75.179006[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyWarren
IncorporatedMarch 8, 1861
Government[6]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • MayorHarry L. Wyant, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • AdministratorMichele D. Broubalow[4]
 • ClerkVictoria L. Kleiner (acting)[5]
Area[2][7]
 • Total3.311 sq mi (8.575 km2)
 • Land3.193 sq mi (8.270 km2)
 • Water0.118 sq mi (0.305 km2)  3.56%
Area rank322nd of 566 in state
19th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[8]299 ft (91 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total14,950
 • Estimate (2012[12])14,699
 • Rank168th of 566 in state
1st of 22 in county[13]
 • Density4,682.1/sq mi (1,807.8/km2)
 • Density rank118th of 566 in state
1st of 22 in county[13]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08865[14][15]
Area code(s)908 exchanges: 213, 387, 454, 859, 995[16]
FIPS code3404158350[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID0885350[19][2]
Websitephillipsburgnj.org

Phillipsburg is a town in Warren County, New Jersey, in the United States.[20] As of 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 14,950,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 216 (-1.4%) from the 15,166 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 591 (-3.8%) from the 15,757 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Phillipsburg was incorporated as a town by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1861, from portions of Phillipsburg Township (now Lopatcong Township).[22]

The town is located in western New Jersey, on the border of Pennsylvania, and is considered the eastern border of the region's Lehigh Valley.

Geography[edit]

Phillipsburg is located at 40°41′31″N 75°10′44″W / 40.691974°N 75.179006°W / 40.691974; -75.179006 (40.691974,-75.179006). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 3.311 square miles (8.575 km2), of which, 3.193 square miles (8.270 km2) of it is land and 0.118 square miles (0.305 km2) of it (3.56%) is water.[1][2]

Pohatcong Mountain is a ridge, approximately 6 mi (9.7 km) long, in the Appalachian Mountains that extends from Phillipsburg northeast approximately to Washington.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18705,932
18807,18121.1%
18908,64420.4%
190010,05216.3%
191013,90338.3%
192016,92321.7%
193019,25513.8%
194018,314−4.9%
195018,9193.3%
196018,502−2.2%
197017,849−3.5%
198016,647−6.7%
199015,757−5.3%
200015,166−3.8%
201014,950−1.4%
Est. 201214,699[12]−1.7%
Population sources:
1870-1920[23] 1870[24][25]
1880-1890[26] 1890-1910[27]
1910-1930[28] 1930-1990[29]
2000[30][31] 2010[9][10][11][22]

The Town's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,950 people, 5,925 households, and 3,786 families residing in the town. The population density was 4,682.1 per square mile (1,807.8 /km2). There were 6,607 housing units at an average density of 2,069.2 per square mile (798.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 83.44% (12,475) White, 7.49% (1,120) Black or African American, 0.17% (26) Native American, 1.53% (228) Asian, 0.05% (8) Pacific Islander, 3.92% (586) from other races, and 3.39% (507) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.82% (1,767) of the population.[9]

There were 5,925 households, of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.12.[9]

In the town, 25.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.1 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $42,825 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,386) and the median family income was $51,334 (+/- $3,243). Males had a median income of $44,311 (+/- $2,090) versus $37,673 (+/- $6,847) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,291 (+/- $1,061). About 16.5% of families and 18.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.1% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 15,166 people, 6,044 households, and 3,946 families residing in the town. The population density was 4,703.6 people per square mile (1,818.5/km2). There were 6,651 housing units at an average density of 2,062.8 per square mile (797.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 91.84% White, 3.47% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.83% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.02% from other races, and 1.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.38% of the population.[30][31]

There were 6,044 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.4% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.08.[30][31]

In the town the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.5 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the town was $37,368, and the median income for a family was $46,925. Males had a median income of $37,446 versus $25,228 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,452. About 9.9% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.6% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Industrial history[edit]

Phillipsburg had historically benefited from being a major transportation hub, situated at the confluence of the Delaware and Lehigh rivers. Phillipsburg served as the western terminus of the Morris Canal for approximately 100 years from the 1820s to 1920s, which connected the city by water to the industrial and consumer centers of the New York City area, with connections westward via the Lehigh Canal across the Delaware. Long gone is the era of canal shipping and many of the important freight railways that served the area have gone bankrupt or bypass the city on long distance routes.

Phillipsburg was served by five major railroads:
1. Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ)
2. Lehigh & Hudson River Railroad (L&HR)
3. Lehigh Valley Railroad (LVRR)
4. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western (DL&W)
5. Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR).

Economic revival[edit]

Most of the manufacturing jobs have left Warren County's largest city. In 1994, the New Jersey Legislature designated Phillipsburg as an Urban Enterprise Zone community. This zoning offers tax incentives and other benefits to Phillipsburg-based businesses, as well as a 3½% sales tax rate at eligible merchants, reduced from the 7% rate charged statewide.[33]

In recent years, some businesses have begun to move into the center of the city. Rising real estate prices indicate that these legislative stimulants have been somewhat effective.[citation needed] Phillipsburg has been selected as a site for the New Jersey Railroad and Transportation Heritage Center (jointly with Netcong), a museum designed to help preserve and showcase the state's transportation history.[34]

Railway[edit]

A tourist railroad known as the Belvidere & Delaware River Railroad operates on the former Belvidere-Delaware Railroad Pennsylvania Railroad Branch serving excursions from Lehigh Junction Station south to Carpentersville. Norfolk Southern serves the industrial manufacturing purposes in Phillipsburg using former LVRR tracks and the L&HR bridge to connect with the Bel-Del PRR tracks.

Since 2007, New Jersey Transit has been conducting a study to determine if re-establishing a commuter rail extension of the Raritan Valley Line to Phillipsburg is economically feasible.[35]

Phillipsburg also is home to the Phillipsburg Railroad Historians museum. They have a display railroad memorabilia inside the museum, an "N" scale diorama, two Lehigh & Hudson River cabooses (one of which is currently being restored) and a Jersey Central caboose. There is a L&HR snow flanger, Tidewater tank car, a CNJ box car owned by the Anthracite Railroads Historical Society, a 1922 Chestnut Ridge Mack railbus owned by the Lehigh Valley NRHS, a Public Service trolley owned by the North Jersey Electric Railway Historical Society, a 44 ton GE locomotive and a 25 ton GE locomotive.[36] They operate a miniature railroad, the Centerville & Southwestern, that formerly ran in Roseland, New Jersey.[37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Phillipsburg is governed under the Mayor-Council system of municipal government under the Faulkner Act by a mayor and a five-member Town Council. Councilmembers are elected at large to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats up for election every other year.[6][38]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Phillipsburg is Harry L. Wyant, Jr. (R, term of office ends December 31, 2015),[39] a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition.[40] Town Council members are Council President Bernie Fey, Jr. (R, 2013), Council Vice President Todd M. Tersigni (D, 2013), John A. Lynn, Jr. (R, 2015), Randy S. Piazza, Sr. (R, 2013) and James P. Stettner (D, 2015).[41][42][43][44]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Phillipsburg is located in the 7th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[10][46][47] Prior to the 2010 Census, Phillipsburg had been part of the 5th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[48]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[52][53]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[54][55] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[56] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[57]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are elected at-large on a staggered basis with one seat coming up for election each year. At an annual organization held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve sa Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2013, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2013) Freeholder Deputy Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015) and Freeholder Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014).[58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[59] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[60][61] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,681 registered voters in Phillipsburg, of which 2,496 (32.5% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,510 (19.7% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 3,665 (47.7% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 10 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the town's 2010 Census population, 51.4% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 69.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,487 votes here (56.6% vs. 40.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,751 votes (39.8% vs. 56.0%) and other candidates with 88 votes (2.0% vs. 1.7%), among the 4,394 ballots cast by the town's 7,730 registered voters, for a turnout of 56.8% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[65][66] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,673 votes here (54.8% vs. 41.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,983 votes (40.6% vs. 55.2%) and other candidates with 116 votes (2.4% vs. 1.6%), among the 4,879 ballots cast by the town's 7,636 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.9% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,412 votes here (49.8% vs. 37.2% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 2,324 votes (48.0% vs. 61.0%) and other candidates with 66 votes (1.4% vs. 1.3%), among the 4,842 ballots cast by the town's 7,176 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.5% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,321 votes here (44.1% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,159 votes (38.7% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 365 votes (12.2% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 77 votes (2.6% vs. 1.5%), among the 2,994 ballots cast by the town's 7,437 registered voters, yielding a 40.3% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[69]

Education[edit]

The Phillipsburg School District serves public school students from pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade, including students from five sending communities who attend the district's high school.[70] The district is one of 31 Abbott districts statewide,[71] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[72][73] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 2,929 students and 307.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.54:1.[74]

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[75]) are Early Childhood Learning Center[76] (Grades PreK-K, 475 students), Barber School[77] (1&2, 210), Freeman School[78] (1&2, 197), Andover-Morris School[79] (3-5, 252), Green Street School[80] (3-5, 318), Phillipsburg Middle School[81] (6-8, 532), Phillipsburg High School[82] (9-12, 1,638) which serves students from Phillipsburg and from the sending communities of Alpha, Bloomsbury (in Hunterdon County), Greenwich Township, Lopatcong Township and Pohatcong Township as part of sending/receiving relationships, along with Phillipsburg Alternative Secondary High School[83] (6-12) which serves at-risk students in a more relaxed environment with small class sizes and individualized instruction that is designed to help students succeed.[84][85][70][86]

The Phillipsburg High School Stateliners have an athletic rivalry with neighboring Easton, Pennsylvania's Easton Area High School, which celebrated its 100th anniversary game on Thanksgiving Day 2006.[87] In 2009, the 1993 teams from the Easton P-Burg Game met again for the Gatorade REPLAY Game to resolve the game, which ended in a 7-7 tie, with more than 13,000 fans watching as Phillipsburg won by a score of 27-12.[88]

Students from the town and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[89] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[90] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[91][84] In addition, Phillipsburg also contains a non-profit, catholic elementary school.

Private schools include Saints Philip & James School, which was established in 1875 and serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, operating under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen[92][93]

Transportation[edit]

Major highways that enter Phillipsburg include U.S. Route 22, Route 122, and Interstate 78.

The town is connected to Pennsylvania across the Delaware River by the Easton–Phillipsburg Toll Bridge - (toll bridge carrying U.S. Route 22), Northampton Street Bridge (the "Free Bridge") and the Interstate 78 Toll Bridge (carrying Interstate 78), all of which are operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission.[94]

New Jersey Transit bus service is provided on the 890 and 891 routes.[95] It is also served by a line down Route 57 to Washington Township. [96] [97]

By air, Phillipsburg is served by Lehigh Valley International Airport.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Phillipsburg include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Town Business Administrator, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed March 14, 2011.
  5. ^ Town Clerk, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 103.
  7. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- Place and (in selected states) County Subdivision from 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Town of Phillipsburg, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Phillipsburg town, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Phillipsburg town, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Phillipsburg, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Phillipsburg, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ "History of the Lehigh Valley" Page 1, 1860
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 248. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed June 13, 2013. "Phillipsburg is on the Delaware directly opposite Easton in Pennsylvania. The city of the same name is divided into three wards. The population in 1860 was 3,741 and in 1870 5,932." Note that the 1860 population is for Phillipsburg Township, which was renamed to Lopatcong Township.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Phillipsburg town, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Phillipsburg town, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Phillipsburg town, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 29, 2012.
  33. ^ Geographic & Urban Redevelopment Tax Credit Programs: Urban Enterprise Zone Employee Tax Credit, State of New Jersey, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 25, 2009. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  34. ^ Friends of NJ Transportation Heritage Center, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  35. ^ Staff. "Extending Raritan Valley railroad service to Phillipsburg will be discussed", Warren Reporter, April 26, 2011. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  36. ^ About us, Phillipsburg Railroad Historians. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  37. ^ Jackson, Kirk Beldon. "AT P'BURG FEST, TRAIN IS TOPS", The Morning Call, July 26, 1992. Accessed June 14, 2012.
  38. ^ Form of Government, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  39. ^ Mayor Bio, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed March 14, 2011.
  40. ^ "Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members". 
  41. ^ Town Council Bios, Town of Phillipsburg. Accessed June 13, 2013.
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  43. ^ GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 2009, WARREN COUNTY Official Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey Clerk, November 5, 2010. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  44. ^ WARREN COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 8, 2011, WARREN COUNTY Official Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey Clerk, November 15, 2011. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  45. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  53. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  55. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  56. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
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