Philip Johnson-Laird

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Philip Johnson-Laird (born 12 October 1936) is a professor at Princeton University's Department of Psychology and author of several notable books on human cognition and the psychology of reasoning.[1]

He was educated at Culford School and University College London where he won the Rosa Morison Medal in 1964 and a James Sully Scholarship between 1964–66. He achieved a BA there in 1964 and a PhD in 1967. He was elected to a Fellowship in 1994.

He is currently the Stuart Professor of Psychology at Princeton University's Department of Psychology

His entry in Who's Who (2007 edition) records the following career history:

Johnson-Laird is a Fellow of the American Philosophical Society, a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Fellow of the British Academy, a William James Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and a Fellow of the Cognitive Science Society. He has been awarded honorary doctorates from: Göteborg, 1983; Padua, 1997; Madrid, 2000; Dublin, 2000; Ghent, 2002; Palermo, 2005. He won the Spearman Medal in 1974, the British Psychological Society President's Award in 1985, and the International Prize from Fyssen Foundation in 2002.

Along with several other scholars, Johnson-Laird delivered the 2001 Gifford Lectures in Natural Theology at the University of Glasgow, published as The Nature and Limits of Human Understanding (ed. Anthony Sanford, T & T Clark, 2003). He has been a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences since 2007.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ahmed, F. (2011). "Profile of Philip N. Johnson-Laird". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108 (50): 19862–4. doi:10.1073/pnas.1117174108. PMC 3250179. PMID 22065789.  edit

Selected publications[edit]