Peter Mahovlich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Peter Mahovlich
Pete Mahovlich.jpg
Pete Mahovlich coaching the Montreal Canadiens Alumni at the Legends Classic in Toronto in 2008
Born(1946-10-10) October 10, 1946 (age 68)
Timmins, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 5 in (196 cm)
Weight210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
PositionCentre
ShotLeft
Played forNHL
Detroit Red Wings
Montreal Canadiens
Pittsburgh Penguins
AHL
Pittsburgh Hornets
Montreal Voyageurs
Adirondack Red Wings
CHL
Fort Worth Wings
IHL
Toledo Goaldiggers
National team Canada
NHL Draft2nd overall, 1963
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career1965–1982
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Peter Mahovlich
Pete Mahovlich.jpg
Pete Mahovlich coaching the Montreal Canadiens Alumni at the Legends Classic in Toronto in 2008
Born(1946-10-10) October 10, 1946 (age 68)
Timmins, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 5 in (196 cm)
Weight210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
PositionCentre
ShotLeft
Played forNHL
Detroit Red Wings
Montreal Canadiens
Pittsburgh Penguins
AHL
Pittsburgh Hornets
Montreal Voyageurs
Adirondack Red Wings
CHL
Fort Worth Wings
IHL
Toledo Goaldiggers
National team Canada
NHL Draft2nd overall, 1963
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career1965–1982

Peter Joseph "Little M" Mahovlich (born October 10, 1946) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player, coach and executive. Known in his playing years as "Little M", as his older brother Frank was the "Big M.", Mahovlich played in the National Hockey League (NHL) with several clubs, including the Montreal Canadiens, where he played with his brother and was a member of four Stanley Cup championship teams.

Playing career[edit]

Pete Mahovlich was drafted second Overall by the Detroit Red Wings in the 1963 NHL Amateur Draft. He played for the National Hockey League's Detroit Red Wings twice, Montreal Canadiens, Pittsburgh Penguins, the Ontario Hockey Association's Hamilton Red Wings, the AHL's Pittsburgh Hornets, Montreal Voyageurs, Adirondack Red Wings, the Central Hockey League's Fort Worth Wings and the IHL's Toledo Goaldiggers.

He was an important contributor to the Canadiens' cup-winning teams of 1971, 1973, 1976 and 1977, before eventually being traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins. He enjoyed a breakout season in 1970–71, scoring 35 goals in the regular season and another 10 in the playoffs as the Canadiens won the championship. His best year came in 1974–75, when he racked up 117 points as part of a deep forward corps that included the likes of Guy Lafleur, Jacques Lemaire, Yvan Cournoyer, Steve Shutt and Bob Gainey. He hit the 100-point mark again the following year, finishing with 105.

Pete was immensely popular as a Pittsburgh Penguin, and cheers of "Pete, Pete" were common when he made one of his end-to-end dashes up ice. Pete was characterized as easy going, joyful, and a party-goer in Ken Dryden's book The Game.

In his 16-year NHL career, he totalled 288 goals and 485 assists for 773 points in 884 games. Internationally, he was a member of the 1972 Summit Series, in which he scored a memorable shorthanded goal in Game 2 of the series. He also played on the 1976 Canada Cup team.

Post-playing career[edit]

After, his retirement, he was head coach of the Toledo Goaldiggers, IHL Colorado Rangers (co-coach), Denver Rangers, CHL Fort Worth Fire and the AHL Cape Breton Oilers. Peter is also the brother of former Canadian Senator and former hockey star Frank Mahovlich. The two were teammates on the Red Wings from 1967 to 1969 and on the Canadiens from 1971 to 1974.

Mahovlich was a scout for the Edmonton Oilers from 1995 to 1997 before joining the Tampa Bay Lightning and then the Atlanta Thrashers

Peter is currently a pro scout for the Florida Panthers.

Career statistics[edit]

  Regular season Playoffs
SeasonTeamLeagueGPGAPtsPIM+/-GPGAPtsPIM
1963–64Hamilton Red WingsOHA-Jr.5420274767-00000
1964–65Hamilton Red WingsOHA-Jr.5520355588-00000
1965–66Hamilton Red WingsOHA-Jr.46142236121-40002
1965–66Detroit Red WingsNHL30110000000
1966–67Detroit Red WingsNHL3413416000000
1966–67Pittsburgh HornetsAHL18471137-90002
1967–68Detroit Red WingsNHL15641013-600000
1967–68Fort Worth WingsCPHL42201434103-00000
1968–69Detroit Red WingsNHL3022421-1500000
1968–69Fort Worth WingsCHL3419173654-00000
1969–70Montreal CanadiensNHL36981751900000
1969–70Montreal VoyageursAHL3121194077-00000
1970–71*Montreal CanadiensNHL7835266118125201061643
1971–72Montreal CanadiensNHL7535326710316602212
1972–73Team Canada1972 Summit Series------71124
1972–73*Montreal CanadiensNHL6121385942117491322
1973–74Montreal CanadiensNHL78363773494262134
1974–75Montreal CanadiensNHL80358211712241116101610
1975–76*Montreal CanadiensNHL803471105767113481224
1976–77*Montreal CanadiensNHL7615476245361345919
1977–78Montreal CanadiensNHL173584600000
1977–78Pittsburgh PenguinsNHL5725366137400000
1978–79Pittsburgh PenguinsNHL6014395339-1120110
1979–80Detroit Red WingsNHL8016506669300000
1980–81Detroit Red WingsNHL2414526-800000
1980–81Adirondack Red WingsAHL3718183649-181181923
1981–82Adirondack Red WingsAHL8022456771-42132
16 seasonsNHL total884288485773916088304272134

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
None
Detroit Red Wings first round draft pick
1963
Succeeded by
Claude Gauthier