Pennsauken Township, New Jersey

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Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pennsauken
Motto: A Great Place to Grow, Dream and Prosper!
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°58′06″N 75°03′29″W / 39.968392°N 75.057942°W / 39.968392; -75.057942Coordinates: 39°58′06″N 75°03′29″W / 39.968392°N 75.057942°W / 39.968392; -75.057942[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyCamden
IncorporatedFebruary 18, 1892
Government[6]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorRick Taylor (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • AdministratorEd Grochowski[4]
 • ClerkGene Padalino[5]
Area[2]
 • Total12.082 sq mi (31.291 km2)
 • Land10.435 sq mi (27.027 km2)
 • Water1.647 sq mi (4.264 km2)  13.63%
Area rank192nd of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[7]89 ft (27 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total35,885
 • Estimate (2012[11])35,765
 • Rank65th of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county[12]
 • Density3,438.9/sq mi (1,327.8/km2)
 • Density rank187th of 566 in state
23rd of 37 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes08109-08110[13][14]
Area code(s)856[15]
FIPS code3400757660[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0882157[18][2]
Websitewww.twp.pennsauken.nj.us
 
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Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pennsauken
Motto: A Great Place to Grow, Dream and Prosper!
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°58′06″N 75°03′29″W / 39.968392°N 75.057942°W / 39.968392; -75.057942Coordinates: 39°58′06″N 75°03′29″W / 39.968392°N 75.057942°W / 39.968392; -75.057942[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyCamden
IncorporatedFebruary 18, 1892
Government[6]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorRick Taylor (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • AdministratorEd Grochowski[4]
 • ClerkGene Padalino[5]
Area[2]
 • Total12.082 sq mi (31.291 km2)
 • Land10.435 sq mi (27.027 km2)
 • Water1.647 sq mi (4.264 km2)  13.63%
Area rank192nd of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[7]89 ft (27 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total35,885
 • Estimate (2012[11])35,765
 • Rank65th of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county[12]
 • Density3,438.9/sq mi (1,327.8/km2)
 • Density rank187th of 566 in state
23rd of 37 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes08109-08110[13][14]
Area code(s)856[15]
FIPS code3400757660[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0882157[18][2]
Websitewww.twp.pennsauken.nj.us

Pennsauken Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States, and a suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 35,885,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 148 (+0.4%) from the 35,737 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 999 (+2.9%) from the 34,738 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Pennsauken is home to a large industrial park that includes a Pepsi bottling plant and J & J Snack Foods.

History[edit]

Pennsauken Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 18, 1892, from portions of the now-defunct Stockton Township.[20]

The exact origin of the name Pennsauken is unclear but it is probably from the tongue of the Lenni Lenape people (a Native American group which once occupied the area). The Lenape language term for "tobacco pouch" is "Pindasenauken".[21]

Pennsauken was home to America's first drive-in movie theater, created in 1933 with the opening of the Camden Drive-In in Pennsauken.[22] It featured the comedy Wives Beware, released in the theaters as Two White Arms.

For 50 years, the township was the home to the Pennsauken Mart, a large multi-vendor indoor market, which was closed in January 2006 to make way for a sports arena/conference complex. Most of the vendors moved to the Grand Market Place in Willingboro Township.[23]

Geography[edit]

Pennsauken Township is located at 39°58′06″N 75°03′29″W / 39.968392°N 75.057942°W / 39.968392; -75.057942 (39.968392,-75.057942). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 12.082 square miles (31.291 km2), of which, 10.435 square miles (27.027 km2) of it is land and 1.647 square miles (4.264 km2) of it (13.63%) is water.[2][1]

The township includes Petty's Island, a 392-acre (1.59 km2) island in the Delaware River although most of the island actually sits across a narrow strait from neighboring Camden. Once an oil storage and distribution facility, the island is now the site of a container cargo shipping operation and nesting bald eagles. Petty's Island is currently the focal point of the township's waterfront redevelopment plan.[24]

Pennsauken borders Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The two municipalities are connected across the Delaware River by the Betsy Ross Bridge which is owned and operated by the Delaware River Port Authority. In New Jersey, Pennsauken borders Camden, Collingswood, Merchantville, Cherry Hill, Palmyra, Maple Shade Township and Cinnaminson Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
19003,145
19104,16932.6%
19206,47455.3%
193016,915161.3%
194017,7454.9%
195022,76728.3%
196033,77148.3%
197036,3947.8%
198033,775−7.2%
199034,7382.9%
200035,7372.9%
201035,8850.4%
Est. 201235,765[11]−0.3%
Population sources:
1900-2000[25] 1900-1920[26]
1900-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 35,885 people, 12,633 households, and 8,995 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,438.9 per square mile (1,327.8 /km2). There were 13,275 housing units at an average density of 1,272.2 per square mile (491.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 47.60% (17,081) White, 26.87% (9,644) Black or African American, 0.59% (210) Native American, 7.72% (2,770) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 13.59% (4,877) from other races, and 3.59% (1,288) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 26.91% (9,657) of the population.[8]

There were 12,633 households of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 18.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.8% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.36.[8]

In the township, 24.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.0 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,241 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,957) and the median family income was $65,910 (+/- $3,272). Males had a median income of $47,651 (+/- $3,101) versus $39,229 (+/- $2,035) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,048 (+/- $1,438). About 6.4% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.4% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 35,737 people, 12,389 households, and 9,093 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,392.4 people per square mile (1,310.4/km2). There were 12,945 housing units at an average density of 1,228.8 per square mile (474.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 60.10% White, 24.18% African American, 0.35% Native American, 4.58% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 8.27% from other races, and 2.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.34% of the population.[30][31]

There were 12,389 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 16.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.34.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $47,538, and the median income for a family was $52,760. Males had a median income of $37,652 versus $30,100 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,004. About 6.1% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Pennsauken Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Pennsauken Township Committee are Mayor Rick Taylor (term of office ends December 31, 2013), Deputy Mayor Jack Killion (2014), John Figueroa (2015), John Kneib (2015) and Betsy McBride (2014).[33][34]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pennsauken Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[9][36][37] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Pennsauken Township had been in the 7th state legislative district.[38]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[42][43]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members elected at-large to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[47] As of 2013, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[48], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2013)[49], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[50], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[51], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[52], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[53] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2013).[54][55][56] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[57] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[58] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 22,704 registered voters in Pennsauken Township, of which 9,989 (44.0%) were registered as Democrats, 2,263 (10.0%) were registered as Republicans and 10,443 (46.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 9 voters registered to other parties.[60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 74.0% of the vote here (12,195 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 23.2% (3,824 votes), with 16,485 ballots cast among the township's 21,669 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.1%.[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 63.7% of the vote here (9,384 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 32.1% (4,720 votes), with 14,726 ballots cast among the township's 20,846 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.6.[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 64.% of the vote here (5,594 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 28.8% (2,517 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.2% (364 votes), with 8,745 ballots cast among the township's 22,497 registered voters, yielding a 38.9% turnout.[63]

Education[edit]

The Pennsauken Public Schools serve public school students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are Baldwin Early Childhood Learning Center[65] for PreK (127 students), seven elementary schools — Burling Elementary School[66] (K-4; 132), Carson Elementary School[67] (PreK-4; 392), Delair Elementary School[68] (K-4; 397), George B. Fine Elementary School[69] (PreK-4; 354), Benjamin Franklin Elementary School[70] (K-4; 446), Longfellow Elementary School[71] (K-4; 244), Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School[72] (K-4; 192) — Pennsauken Intermediate School[73] (5&6; 802), Howard M. Phifer Middle School[74] (7&8; 831) and Pennsauken High School[75] (9-12; 1,570).[76][77] Students from Merchantville attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Merchantville School District.[78] The Merchantville district has sought to end the relationship with the Pennsauken school and send its students to Haddon Heights High School.[79]

Also available in the township is the Pennsauken Technical High School, which offers day and evening classes to students from across the county.[80]

Bishop Eustace Preparatory School is a coeducational, private high school for students in grades 9-12, founded in 1954 by the priests and brothers of the Society of the Catholic Apostolate (the Pallottines). St. Cecilia School and St. Stephen's School are elementary schools that operate under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[81]

Transportation[edit]

Major roads through the township include Route 130, the largest highway through the township, which also intersects with Route 73 in the northern part of the township, near the Cinnaminson Township border. Route 90 is a short highway leading to the Betsy Ross Bridge which connects the township with Philadelphia. Owned and operated by the Delaware River Port Authority, the bridge stretches 8,500 feet (2,600 m) between abutments and opened to traffic on April 30, 1976.[82] Routes 38 and 70 also merge westbound in the eastern part of the township near the Cherry Hill border.

The township hosts two New Jersey Transit rail stops. The Pennsauken-Route 73 station on the River Line offers service between Trenton and Camden. The Pennsauken Transit Center[83] on River Road features a transfer between the River Line and Atlantic City Line service between Atlantic City and Philadelphia.[84] The station was constructed at a cost of $40 million and opened for commuters in October 2013.[85]

New Jersey Transit bus service between the township and Philadelphia is available on the 317, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 409, 413, 419 routes, with local service available on the 452 route.[86]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Pennsauken Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Contacts, Pennsauken Township. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk's Office, Pennsauken Township. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 38.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Pennsauken, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pennsauken township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pennsauken township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pennsauken, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Pennsauken, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 108. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  21. ^ Pennsauken: Centuries of growth, Courier-Post, October 19, 2006.
  22. ^ Strauss, Robert. "The Drive-In Theater Tries a Comeback; Looking for a Few Hundred Adventurous Moviegoers", The New York Times, July 23, 2004. Accessed July 24, 2012. "The nation's first drive-in theater was built by the Hollingshead family along the tawdry Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Pennsauken, N.J., in 1933."
  23. ^ Strauss, Robert. "Final Days for the Pennsauken Mart", The New York Times, January 8, 2006. Accessed July 24, 2012. "But at the end of the month, Mr. Kramer will be moving his stool, along with the polyester and cotton, the jeans and the shirts, out of Pennsauken for good. The Mart, a downscale 50-year-old shopping barn -- a precursor and perhaps progenitor of the mall culture that came just after it -- is closing, the victim of redevelopment."
  24. ^ Ung, Elisa; and Ott, Dwight. "New plan for Petty's Island Pennsauken now is backing a proposal with less development.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 22, 2007. Accessed July 24, 2012. "That, he said, is 12 percentage points less than the current, controversial footprint proposed by developer Cherokee Pennsauken L.L.C. for the island's 392 acres.... Petty's Island was home to a pair of nesting bald eagles when it became an environmental and political controversy after Citgo Petroleum offered to donate it to the state as open space in 2004. Pennsauken officials and state Democratic power brokers, however, wanted to develop it as part of a $1 billion makeover of formerly industrial waterfront."
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pennsauken township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pennsauken township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Pennsauken township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  33. ^ Government, Pennsauken Township. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  34. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Pennsauken Township. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  43. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ State of the County and Reorganization Meeting, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder-Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. delivered the State of the County address as the Freeholder Board officially reorganized on Jan. 4 at 4:00 p.m. at the Camden County Courthouse. Newly elected Freeholder Michelle Gentek took the oath of office along with Ian Leonard and Jeffrey L. Nash to join their colleagues on the 2013 Freeholder Board."
  57. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ Surrogate's Court, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  62. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  64. ^ Data for the Pennsauken Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  65. ^ Baldwin Early Childhood Learning Center, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  66. ^ Burling Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  67. ^ Carson Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  68. ^ Delair Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  69. ^ George B. Fine Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  70. ^ Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  71. ^ Longfellow Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  72. ^ Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  73. ^ Pennsauken Intermediate School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  74. ^ Howard M. Phifer Middle School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  75. ^ Pennsauken High School, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  76. ^ Schools, Pennsauken Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  77. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Pennsauken Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  78. ^ Florio, Gwen. "LOOKING BEYOND THE SCHOOL DECISION TIME TO MAKE UP, OFFICIALS SAY, AFTER A DECADE OF FUSSING.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 21, 1992. Accessed July 10, 2008. "Ever since its own high school closed in 1972, the Borough of Merchantville has been sending its public school students to Pennsauken High School."
  79. ^ "Expert report on the Termination of the Sending-receiving Agreement Between the Merchantville School District and the Pennsauken Public Schools", Merchantville School District, March 2013. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  80. ^ Pennsauken Technical High School, Camden County Technical Schools. Accessed July 20, 2008.
  81. ^ Camden County Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed July 10, 2008.
  82. ^ Betsy Ross Bridge, Delaware River Port Authority. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  83. ^ Pennsauken Transit Center, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  84. ^ Atlantic City Rail Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  85. ^ Boyer, Barbara. "New station links two South Jersey rail lines", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 14, 2013. Accessed October 15, 2013. "The $40 million Pennsauken Transit Center that officially opened Monday morning, linking NJ Transit's River Line to its Atlantic City Rail Line, offers more than a quick trip to the Jersey Shore."
  86. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  87. ^ Nagourney, Eric. "Harold Amos, 84, Pacesetter Among Blacks in Academia", The New York Times, March 6, 2003. Accessed July 24, 2012. "Harold Amos was born in Pennsauken, N.J. The second of nine children, he attended a two-room segregated schoolhouse, recalled Howard R. Amos, his younger brother."
  88. ^ Whittaker, Celeste E. "Pennsauken grad Fisher wins MAC's top honor at Kent State", Courier-Post, March 27, 2008. Accessed July 24, 2012. Al Fisher couldn't have asked for a better first season at Kent State. The former Pennsauken High School standout was the Mid-American Conference Player of the Year, led his team in scoring and assists, and topped it off by making an appearance in the NCAA tournament."
  89. ^ Bill Gosper, Vintage Computer Festival. Accessed January 3, 2007.
  90. ^ a b Bloom, Earl. "The 49ers' Taylor and Chargers' Griggs grew up in Pennsauken, N.J.", The Orange County Register, January 29, 1995. Accessed June 10, 2007. "The residents of Remington Street in Pennsauken, N.J., will have a particularly high interest in Super Bowl 29 today. San Diego Chargers outside linebacker David Griggs and San Francisco 49ers wide receiver John Taylor grew up on the same block in the town of 35,000 near Philadelphia."
  91. ^ Staff. "Pennsauken reliving past glory", Courier-Post, September 18, 2005. Accessed July 24, 2012. "It is not just the current players who think Pennsauken football is well on its way back. Former Pennsauken great Dwight Hicks was at the game."
  92. ^ Nussbaum, Debra. "IN PERSON; Some Build Castles. She Writes Novels.", The New York Times, June 15, 2003. Accessed March 10, 2011. "Ms. Lechleidner, who lives in Collingswood, was born and raised in the working-class town of Pennsauken."
  93. ^ Thamel, Pete. "THE MOST POWERFUL MAN IN BASKETBALL NOBODY KNOWS", The New York Times, April 5, 2008. Accessed July 24, 2012. "Growing up in a middle class family in Camden County, N.J., Wesley was so outgoing that he was voted Class Loudmouth at Pennsauken High in 1982."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Palmyra
Burlington County
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia
Succeeded by
Camden