Pat Crowley

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Pat Crowley
Pat Crowley 1949.JPG
Crowley in 1949
BornPatricia Crowley
(1933-09-17) September 17, 1933 (age 81)
Olyphant, Pennsylvania, U.S.
OccupationFilm and television actress
Years active1950-present
Spouse(s)Ed Hookstratten (1957) (divorced)
Andy Friendly (1986-present)
ChildrenJon Hookstratten and Ann Hookstratten
 
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Pat Crowley
Pat Crowley 1949.JPG
Crowley in 1949
BornPatricia Crowley
(1933-09-17) September 17, 1933 (age 81)
Olyphant, Pennsylvania, U.S.
OccupationFilm and television actress
Years active1950-present
Spouse(s)Ed Hookstratten (1957) (divorced)
Andy Friendly (1986-present)
ChildrenJon Hookstratten and Ann Hookstratten

Patricia "Pat" Crowley (born September 17, 1933) is an American film and television actress.[2]

Biography[edit]

Career[edit]

Pat Crowley with Elliott Reid (1959)

Crowley played Sally Carver in the film Forever Female (1953), starring Ginger Rogers and William Holden. She starred as Doctor Autumn Claypool alongside Martin and Lewis in Money from Home (1953), as well as in their final film together Hollywood or Bust (1956), in which she played Terry Roberts. Her roles in Forever Female and Money from Home led to her receiving the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year - Actress.

Crowley made guest appearances in several television series in the 1950s and 1960s, including the pilot for The Untouchables, Crossroads, Riverboat, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, The Eleventh Hour, The Roaring 20s, Mr. Novak, The Twilight Zone, The Fugitive, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., 87th Precinct and Wanted: Dead or Alive (episode "Competition"). She was the only actress to appear as leading lady for both James Garner and Roger Moore in the same episode of Maverick, "The Rivals," a 1958 reworking of Richard Brinsley Sheridan's 1775 comedy of manners play. She starred from 1965 to 1967 as Joan Nash in the NBC-MGM television sitcom Please Don't Eat the Daisies, based on the 1957 book by Jean Kerr and the 1960 Doris Day/David Niven film of the same name.[2]

In 1963 she starred in an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, "A matter of murder".

A frequent guest star of popular series, Crowley also sang and danced on The Dean Martin Show and appeared in dramatic roles on Bonanza, Charlie's Angels, Columbo, Police Woman, The Streets of San Francisco, Hawaii 5-0, The Rockford Files, The Feather and Father Gang, and Quinn Martin's Tales of the Unexpected (in the episode "The Force of Evil"),[3] as well as sitcoms like Happy Days, The Love Boat, Empty Nest, Roseanne, Frasier and Friends.

Crowley with Richard Denning in Michael Shayne (1961)

In 1963 she portrayed Sara May Green in the episode "Incident of the Mountain Man" on CBS's Rawhide.

Crowley is known to a later era of television viewers for her roles on the serials Generations from 1989 to 1990, Port Charles from 1997 to 2003, and The Bold and the Beautiful in 2005. She also appeared as the doomed Emily Fallmont on ten episodes of the nighttime soap opera Dynasty in 1986.

More recently, Crowley portrayed the widow of baseball's Roger Maris in the biopic 61*, directed by Billy Crystal. She appeared in a 2006 episode of The Closer and a 2009 episode of Cold Case.

Personal life[edit]

Crowley is the daughter of Helen and Vincent Crowley, a mine foreman. Her older sister Ann Crowley is an actress and singer. In 1957, she married Edward Gregory Hookstratten, an entertainment and sports lawyer. They had two children, Jon (born 1958) and Ann (born 1960). After they divorced, she wed producer Andy Friendly in 1986.

Crowley was often confused with her acting contemporary Kathleen Crowley, who appeared as the guest leading lady in different episodes of most of the same television series. The two Crowleys never appeared together, however, and were not related. Fess Parker noted in his Archive of American Television interview that there were two actresses named Crowley whom everyone was always mixing up, one tall (Pat) and one short (Kathleen), and that he was paired for one project, despite being six and half feet tall, with the shorter Crowley.

In the 1950s, Crowley rotated her billing from "Patricia Crowley" to "Pat Crowley" and back again, even on some of the same television series, including Maverick.

References[edit]

External links[edit]