Palisades Park, New Jersey

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Palisades Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Palisades Park
Map highlighting Palisades Park's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Palisades Park's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Palisades Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Palisades Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°50′49″N 73°59′49″W / 40.847017°N 73.997062°W / 40.847017; -73.997062Coordinates: 40°50′49″N 73°59′49″W / 40.847017°N 73.997062°W / 40.847017; -73.997062[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1899
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJames Rotundo (D, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorDavid Lorenzo[4]
 • ClerkMartin A. Gobbo[4]
Area[2]
 • Total1.276 sq mi (3.304 km2)
 • Land1.251 sq mi (3.241 km2)
 • Water0.025 sq mi (0.064 km2)  1.93%
Area rank479th of 566 in state
61st of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6]112 ft (34 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total19,622
 • Estimate (2013)20,288[7]
 • Rank132nd of 566 in state
14th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density15,681.6/sq mi (6,054.7/km2)
 • Density rank14th of 566 in state
3rd of 70 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07650[12][13]
Area code(s)201[14]
FIPS code3400355770[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0885338[17][2]
Websitewww.palisadesparknj.us (under construction)
 
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This article is about the New Jersey borough. For other possible uses, see Palisades Park (disambiguation).
Palisades Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Palisades Park
Map highlighting Palisades Park's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Palisades Park's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Palisades Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Palisades Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°50′49″N 73°59′49″W / 40.847017°N 73.997062°W / 40.847017; -73.997062Coordinates: 40°50′49″N 73°59′49″W / 40.847017°N 73.997062°W / 40.847017; -73.997062[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1899
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJames Rotundo (D, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorDavid Lorenzo[4]
 • ClerkMartin A. Gobbo[4]
Area[2]
 • Total1.276 sq mi (3.304 km2)
 • Land1.251 sq mi (3.241 km2)
 • Water0.025 sq mi (0.064 km2)  1.93%
Area rank479th of 566 in state
61st of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6]112 ft (34 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total19,622
 • Estimate (2013)20,288[7]
 • Rank132nd of 566 in state
14th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density15,681.6/sq mi (6,054.7/km2)
 • Density rank14th of 566 in state
3rd of 70 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07650[12][13]
Area code(s)201[14]
FIPS code3400355770[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0885338[17][2]
Websitewww.palisadesparknj.us (under construction)

Palisades Park is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 19,622,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 2,549 (+14.9%) from the 17,073 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,537 (+17.5%) from the 14,536 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

The borough of Palisades Park was created by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1899, from portions of Ridgefield Township. A portion of its area was taken by the neighboring borough of Fort Lee in April 1909.[19][20] The borough was named for its location atop the New Jersey Palisades.[21]

Geography[edit]

Palisades Park is located at 40°50′49″N 73°59′49″W / 40.847017°N 73.997062°W / 40.847017; -73.997062 (40.847017,-73.997062). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.276 square miles (3.304 km2), of which, 1.251 square miles (3.241 km2) of it was land and 0.025 square miles (0.064 km2) of it (1.93%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Broad Avenue, Koreatown in Palisades Park (벼랑 공원 코리아타운).[22] Click on image to view Hangul signs.
Historical population
CensusPop.
1900644
19101,411119.1%
19202,63386.6%
19307,065168.3%
19408,14115.2%
19509,63518.4%
196011,94324.0%
197013,35111.8%
198013,7322.9%
199014,5365.9%
200017,07317.5%
201019,62214.9%
Est. 201320,288[7]3.4%
Population sources:
1900-1920[23] 1900-1910[24]
1910-1930[25] 1900-2010[26][27][28]
2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 19,622 people, 6,934 households, and 5,020 families residing in the borough. The population density was 15,681.6 per square mile (6,054.7 /km2). There were 7,362 housing units at an average density of 5,883.6 per square mile (2,271.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 28.90% (5,670) White, 1.96% (385) Black or African American, 0.31% (60) Native American, 57.84% (11,350) Asian, 0.05% (10) Pacific Islander, 9.00% (1,765) from other races, and 1.95% (382) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 18.22% (3,575) of the population.[8]

There were 6,934 households, of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 19.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.20.[8]

In the borough, 16.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 37.9% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.0 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.[8]

As of the 2010 Census, 51.5% of the population (10,115) reported themselves as being of Korean ancestry,[8][31] with both the highest Korean-American density and percentage of any municipality in the United States.[32] Broad Avenue in Palisades Park's Koreatown[22] has been characterized as a major epicenter of Korean American life.[33]

Same-sex couples headed 41 households in 2010, an increase from the 37 counted in 2000.[34]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $55,602 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,300) and the median family income was $66,725 (+/- $8,196). Males had a median income of $43,919 (+/- $8,170) versus $46,014 (+/- $6,780) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,666 (+/- $2,900). About 12.0% of families and 14.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.6% of those under age 18 and 15.2% of those age 65 or over.[35]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 17,073 people, 6,247 households, and 4,447 families residing in the borough. The population density was 14,112.4 people per square mile (5,447.9/km2). There were 6,386 housing units at an average density of 5,278.6 per square mile (2,037.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 48.27% White, 1.38% African American, 0.19% Native American, 41.09% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 5.80% from other races, and 3.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.48% of the population.[29][30]

In 2000, 36.38% of Palisades Park residents identified as being of Korean heritage. This was the highest percentage of Korean Americans of any place in the country with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry and more than double that of second-ranked Cerritos, California.[36] Also in the 2000 Census, 3.1% of Palisades Park's residents identified themselves as being of Croatian ancestry. This was the second highest percentage of people with Croatian ancestry in any place in New Jersey with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[37]

There were 6,247 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.8% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.20.[29][30]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.4% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 37.8% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.8 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $48,015, and the median income for a family was $54,503. Males had a median income of $37,204 versus $31,997 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,607. About 8.5% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.9% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

The nearby George Washington Bridge, the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge, provides access to Palisades Park from Manhattan in New York City via adjacent Fort Lee.

Local government[edit]

Palisades Park is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Palisades Park, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[38]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Palisades Park is Democrat James Rotundo, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014.[39] Members of the Borough Council are Christopher Chung (D, November 2014; serving an unexpired term ending in 2016), Frank Donohue (D, 2014), Jong Chul Lee (D, 2015), Cyndy Pirrera (D, 2014), Henry Ruh (D, 2016) and Joseph Testa (D, 2015).[40][41][4][42][43][44][45]

Christopher Chung was sworn into office in January 2014, having been selcted by the counci from among three names submitted by the Democratic Municipal Committee to fill the vacant seat of Jason Kim, who had resigned earlier that month.[46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Palisades Park is located in the 9th Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 37th state legislative district.[9][48][49]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[51][52] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[53][54]

The 37th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Loretta Weinberg (D, Teaneck) and in the General Assembly by Valerie Huttle (D, Englewood) and Gordon M. Johnson (D, Englewood).[55] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[56] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[57]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[58] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[59] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[60] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[61] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[62] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[63] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[64] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[65] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[66] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[67][68] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[69] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[70] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[71][72][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,410 registered voters in Palisades Park, of which 1,839 (28.7% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,128 (17.6% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 3,443 (53.7% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[73] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 32.7% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 39.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[73][74]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,487 votes here (67.1% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,147 votes (31.0% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 39 votes (1.1% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,704 ballots cast by the borough's 6,925 registered voters, for a turnout of 53.5% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[75][76]In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,646 votes here (58.7% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,746 votes (38.7% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 46 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,508 ballots cast by the borough's 6,906 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.3% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[77][78] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,650 votes here (58.6% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,830 votes (40.4% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 22 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 4,525 ballots cast by the borough's 7,033 registered voters, for a turnout of 64.3% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[79]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 1,498 ballots cast (58.1% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 913 votes (35.4% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 91 votes (3.5% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 14 votes (0.5% vs. 0.5%), among the 2,578 ballots cast by the borough's 6,693 registered voters, yielding a 38.5% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[80]

Education[edit]

The Palisades Park Public School District serve students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,371 students and 126.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.83:1.[81] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are Dr. Charles R. Smith Early Childhood Center[83] (326 students in grades K-1) Charles A. Lindbergh Elementary School[84] (549 students in grades 2-7) and Palisades Park High School[85] (496 students in grades 8-12).[86]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[87][88]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Northbound U.S. Route 1/9 and eastbound U.S. Route 46 function jointly as a parklike arterial conduit connecting Palisades Park with the George Washington Bridge.

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 28.00 miles (45.06 km) of roadways, of which 22.80 miles (36.69 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.01 miles (1.63 km) by Bergen County and 4.19 miles (6.74 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[89]

Roadways in Palisades Park include U.S. Route 1/9,[90] U.S. Route 46,[91] Route 5,[92] Route 63,[93] Route 93[94] and County Route 501.[95]

The nearby George Washington Bridge, the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge, provides access to Palisades Park from Manhattan in New York City via adjacent Fort Lee.[96][97]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 127, 154, 155, 157, 166 and 168 routes, to Jersey City on the 83 route, with local service offered on the 751 and 755 bus lines.[98]

Rockland Coaches provides service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal on routes 11T/11AT, 14ET, 20/20T and 21T and on the 14K route to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station.[99][100]

Comfort women controversy[edit]

In May 2012, borough officials in Palisades Park rejected requests by two diplomatic delegations from Japan to remove a small monument from a public park, a brass plaque on a block of stone, dedicated in 2010 to the memory of the 200,000 comfort women forced into sexual slavery by Japanese soldiers during World War II. Japanese officials from the first delegation had cited apologies offered by that country's government for its involvement as justifying the removal of the monument, while officials from the second delegation claimed the "comfort women were a lie".[31] Days later, a South Korean delegation endorsed the borough's decision.[101]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Palisades Park include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Bergen County 2012-2013 Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 17, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 157.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Palisades Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Palisades Park borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Palisades Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Palisades Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 22, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Palisades Park, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 30, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 30, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 84. Accessed March 19, 2012.
  20. ^ Bergen County New Jersey Municipalities, Dutch Door Genealogy. Accessed May 26, 2006.
  21. ^ Hutchionson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey State Library, May 1945. Accessed December 12, 2013.
  22. ^ a b Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues Second Edition, Edited by Pyong Gap Min. Pine Forge Press – An Imprint of Sage Publications, Inc. 2006. Retrieved July 24, 2014. 
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 30, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 25, 2011.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2011.
  27. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  28. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Palisades Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Palisades Park borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  31. ^ a b Semple, Kirk. "In New Jersey, Memorial for ‘Comfort Women’ Deepens Old Animosity", The New York Times, May 18, 2012. Accessed June 30, 2012. "The monument, a brass plaque on a block of stone, was dedicated in 2010 to the memory of so-called comfort women, tens of thousands of women and girls, many Korean, who were forced into sexual slavery by Japanese soldiers during World War II. "
  32. ^ Perez-Pena, Richard. "PALISADES PARK JOURNAL As Koreans Pour In, a Town Is Remade", The New York Times, December 16, 2010. Accessed July 24, 2014. "But none more so than Palisades Park, whose population is now 54 percent Asian-American and 44 percent Korean-American, the Census Bureau reported this week. Major population centers like Queens and Los Angeles have more Koreans, but Palisades Park, with fewer than 20,000 people, is, proportionally, the most heavily Korean municipality in the country, according to Pyong Gap Min, a distinguished professor of sociology at Queens College."
  33. ^ Yarvin, Brian. "Jersey Dispatch: Bergen County Koreatown: I judge Korean restaurants entirely by those little dishes called panchan. Anything less than six is a disappointment.", Serious Eats, June 13, 2008. Accessed July 24, 2014. "Broad Avenue in Palisades Park is the epicenter of life in Korean New Jersey."
  34. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Palisades Park borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2011.
  36. ^ Korean Communities, EPodunk. Accessed August 23, 2006.
  37. ^ Croatian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed August 23, 2006.
  38. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  39. ^ Mayor's Message, Palisades Park. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  40. ^ List of Council Members, Palisades Park. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  41. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Palisades Park. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  42. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2012, Bergen County Clerk, November 6, 2012. Accessed December 12, 2013.
  43. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2011, Bergen County Clerk, November 17, 2011. Accessed December 12, 2013.
  44. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2010, Bergen County Clerk, November 10, 2010. Accessed December 12, 2013.
  45. ^ Staff. "Unofficial results for the Nov. 8 municipal and county elections in Bergen, Pas­saic and Morris", The Record (Bergen County), November 9, 2011. Accessed June 30, 2012. "Democrats maintained their full control of the council when two incumbents won reelection. Councilwoman Cynthia A. Pirrera and Councilman Frank Donohue easily defeated their GOP chal­lengers James Roper and Joseph Fiscella."
  46. ^ Alvarado, Monsy. "Christopher Chung tapped to fill vacant council seat in Palisades Park", The Record (Bergen County), January 29, 2014. Accessed August 31, 2014. "The council seat left vacant by Jason Kim, the first Korean-American to serve on the governing body and who resigned earlier this month, will be filled by Christopher Chung."
  47. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  51. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  53. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  54. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  55. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  56. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  57. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  58. ^ a b 2014 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  59. ^ County Executive, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014
  60. ^ Freeholders, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ David L. Ganz, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  62. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  63. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  64. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  65. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  66. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
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