Orange chicken

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Orange Chicken
Flickr preppybyday 4786746354--Orange chicken.jpg
Orange chicken
Origin
Place of originChina (original version)
United States (American Chinese version)
Region or stateHunan (original version)
North America (American Chinese version)
Details
CourseMain
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredient(s)Chicken
Orange sauce or Orange peels
 
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Orange Chicken
Flickr preppybyday 4786746354--Orange chicken.jpg
Orange chicken
Origin
Place of originChina (original version)
United States (American Chinese version)
Region or stateHunan (original version)
North America (American Chinese version)
Details
CourseMain
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredient(s)Chicken
Orange sauce or Orange peels

Orange chicken (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; Mandarin Pinyin: chénpí jī; Wade–Giles: ch'en²-p'i³-chi¹; Jyutping: gan4 pei4 gai1) is an American Chinese dish of Hunan origin.[1] The variety of orange chicken most commonly found at North American fast food restaurants consists of chopped, battered, and fried chicken pieces coated in a sweet orange-flavored chili sauce, which thickens or caramelizes to a glaze. While the dish is very popular in the United States, it is most often found as a variation of General Tso's chicken rather than the authentic dish found in mainland China.

In most countries in the western hemisphere, the names "orange chicken", "orange peel chicken", and "tangerine chicken" are typically used for this particular dish. In Chinese, however, the dish is always known as "陈皮鸡", literally "old peel chicken", referring to dried orange or tangerine peel, which is used in traditional Chinese medicine as well as cooking. For restaurants outside of Asia, fresh orange peel is often used instead, or even no peel at all.

Contents

Recipes and variations

Traditional orange chicken is first deep-fried, and then stir-fried in a lightly sweet soy-based sauce flavored with chopped dried orange peels. It is often garnished with vegetables, such as bok choy and baby carrots. While popular in China, the authentic orange chicken is generally unknown outside of Asia, in order to appeal more to different palates. A recipe given by renowned cooking teacher and chef, Eileen Yin-Fei Lo, is far less sweet than most restaurants in the United States would prepare it and derives most of the flavor from the orange peel used. The typical recipe used in American Chinese restaurants may use orange juice or fresh orange peel rather than dried peel, a great deal of sugar, and often garnishes the dish with steamed broccoli and dried chili peppers. A similar dish is orange peel beef (also called tangerine peel beef).

See also

References

  1. ^ Lo, Eileen Yin-Fei (1999). "Poultry and Other Fowl". The Chinese Kitchen. calligraphy by San Yan Wong (1st Edition ed.). New York, New York: William Morrow and Company. p. 314. ISBN 0-688-15826-9. "ORANGE CHICKEN Chun Pei Gai Pan Traditionally this Hunan recipe contained what is called chun pei, or ‘old skin,’ to describe the dried citrus peel used in its preparation."

External links