One Prudential Plaza

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One Prudential Plaza
2004-09-08 1600x2840 chicago prudentials.jpg
One Prudential Plaza with Two Prudential Plaza towering behind
Former namesPrudential Building
General information
StatusComplete
Location130 E. Randolph St.
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Coordinates41°53′06″N 87°37′24″W / 41.8849°N 87.6233°W / 41.8849; -87.6233Coordinates: 41°53′06″N 87°37′24″W / 41.8849°N 87.6233°W / 41.8849; -87.6233
Completed1955
Height
Antenna spire912 ft (278 m)
Roof601 ft (183 m)
Technical details
Floor count41
 
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One Prudential Plaza
2004-09-08 1600x2840 chicago prudentials.jpg
One Prudential Plaza with Two Prudential Plaza towering behind
Former namesPrudential Building
General information
StatusComplete
Location130 E. Randolph St.
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Coordinates41°53′06″N 87°37′24″W / 41.8849°N 87.6233°W / 41.8849; -87.6233Coordinates: 41°53′06″N 87°37′24″W / 41.8849°N 87.6233°W / 41.8849; -87.6233
Completed1955
Height
Antenna spire912 ft (278 m)
Roof601 ft (183 m)
Technical details
Floor count41

One Prudential Plaza (formerly known as the Prudential Building) is a 41-story structure in Chicago completed in 1955 as the headquarters for Prudential's Mid-America company. At the time, the skyscraper was significant as the first new downtown skyscraper built in Chicago in 21 years (the last such building was the Field Building, now headquarters of LaSalle Bank, completed in 1934). It was the last building ever connected to the Chicago Tunnel Company's tunnel network.

When the Prudential was finished it had the highest roof in Chicago with only the statue of Ceres on the Chicago Board of Trade higher. Its mast served as a broadcasting antenna for Chicago's WGN-TV.

The architect was Naess & Murphy, a precursor to C.F. Murphy & Associates and later Murphy/Jahn Architects.

One Prudential Plaza, along with its sister property, Two Prudential Plaza, was sold in May 2006 for $470 million to BentleyForbes, a Los Angeles-based real estate investment firm, run by C. Frederick Wehba and his family.

After a default on the mortgage encumbering the towers during the recession, New York-based investors 601W Companies and Berkley Properties, represented by New York law firm Olshan Frome Wolosky LLP took control of the towers invested more than $100 million in equity to recapitalize. BentleyForbes, the prior controlling owner of the towers, continues to have an interest in the owning partnership.

Tenants[edit]

1943 view of from One Prudential Plaza location

See also[edit]

Position in Chicago's skyline[edit]

311 South WackerWillis TowerChicago Board of Trade Building111 South WackerAT&T Corporate CenterKluczynski Federal BuildingCNA CenterChase TowerThree First National PlazaMid-Continental PlazaRichard J. Daley CenterChicago Title and Trust Center77 West WackerPittsfield BuildingLeo Burnett BuildingThe Heritage at Millennium ParkCrain Communications BuildingIBM PlazaOne Prudential PlazaTwo Prudential PlazaAon CenterBlue Cross and Blue Shield Tower340 on the ParkPark TowerOlympia Centre900 North MichiganJohn Hancock CenterWater Tower PlaceHarbor PointThe ParkshoreNorth Pier ApartmentsLake Point TowerJay Pritzker PavilionBuckingham FountainLake MichiganLake MichiganLake MichiganThe skyline of a city with many large skyscrapers; in the foreground are a green park and a lake with many sailboats moored on it. Over 30 of the skyscrapers and some park features are labeled.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chicago." SkyTeam. Retrieved on January 31, 2009.

External links[edit]