Armodafinil

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Armodafinil
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(–)-2-[(R)-(diphenylmethyl)sulfinyl]acetamide
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.commonograph
MedlinePlusa602016
Pregnancy cat.C
Legal statusSchedule IV (US) Prescription only
RoutesOral
Pharmacokinetic data
MetabolismHepatic, including CYP3A4 and other pathways
Half-life12-15 hrs
ExcretionUrine (as metabolites)
Identifiers
CAS number112111-43-0 N
ATC codeN06BA07
PubChemCID 9690109
ChemSpider7962943 YesY
UNIIV63XWA605I YesY
KEGGD03215 YesY
ChEMBLCHEMBL1201192 N
Chemical data
FormulaC15H15NO2S 
Mol. mass273.351
 N (what is this?)  (verify)
 
  (Redirected from Nuvigil)
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Armodafinil
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(–)-2-[(R)-(diphenylmethyl)sulfinyl]acetamide
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.commonograph
MedlinePlusa602016
Pregnancy cat.C
Legal statusSchedule IV (US) Prescription only
RoutesOral
Pharmacokinetic data
MetabolismHepatic, including CYP3A4 and other pathways
Half-life12-15 hrs
ExcretionUrine (as metabolites)
Identifiers
CAS number112111-43-0 N
ATC codeN06BA07
PubChemCID 9690109
ChemSpider7962943 YesY
UNIIV63XWA605I YesY
KEGGD03215 YesY
ChEMBLCHEMBL1201192 N
Chemical data
FormulaC15H15NO2S 
Mol. mass273.351
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Armodafinil (Nuvigil) is a stimulant-like drug produced by the pharmaceutical company Cephalon Inc., which was approved by the FDA on June 15, 2007.[1][2] Armodafinil is an enantiopure drug consisting of just the active (−)-(R)-enantiomer of the racemic drug modafinil (Provigil).

Contents

Medical uses

Sleep disorders

Armodafinil is approved by the FDA for the treatment of narcolepsy and shift work sleep disorder, and as an adjunctive treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.[3] For narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea, armodafinil is taken as a once daily 150 mg or 250 mg dose in the morning. For shift work sleep disorder, 150 mg of armodafinil are taken one hour prior to starting work. Slow dose titration is needed to mitigate some side effects.[3]

Depression and schizophrenia

Cephalon plans to conduct one or more Phase III clinical trials evaluating the use of Nuvigil as an adjunctive treatment for bipolar depression.[4] In June, 2010, it was revealed that a phase II study of armodafinil as an adjunctive therapy in adults with schizophrenia had failed to meet the primary endpoints, and the clinical program was subsequently ceased.[5]

Jet lag

The drug was being considered for the first FDA-approved medicinally-specific drug for combating jet-lag.[6] but on March 30, 2010, the FDA declined to approve use of Nuvigil to treat jet lag.[7]

Adverse effects

Armodafinil's common side effects include headache, nausea, insomnia, lack of appetite, dizziness, agitation, anxiety and high blood pressure.[3]

See also

References

External links