University of North Texas

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University of North Texas
MottoA green light to greatness.
Established1890 (1890)
TypeFlagship state university
Endowment$100 million[1]
Budget$336.5 million[2]
ChairmanJack A. Wall[3]
ChancellorLee Jackson
PresidentV. Lane Rawlins
ProvostWarren William Burggren
(age 61)
Academic staff1,442[4]
Students35,694[5]
Undergraduates28,282[4]
Postgraduates7,412[4]
LocationDenton, Texas, United States
CampusSuburban 875 acres (3.54 km2)[1]
Former namesTexas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute (1890–1894)
North Texas Normal College (1894–1901)
North Texas State Normal College (1901–1923)
North Texas State Teachers College (1923–1949)
North Texas State College (1949–1961)
North Texas State University (1961–1988)
Colors     Green and      White[6]
AthleticsNorth Texas Mean Green
SportsNCAA Division IFBS
NicknameMean Green
MascotScrappy the Eagle
AffiliationsSun Belt Conference
Websitewww.unt.edu
Official watermark for the University of North Texas
All enrollment and employment figures are as of the fall 2011 semester.
 
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University of North Texas
MottoA green light to greatness.
Established1890 (1890)
TypeFlagship state university
Endowment$100 million[1]
Budget$336.5 million[2]
ChairmanJack A. Wall[3]
ChancellorLee Jackson
PresidentV. Lane Rawlins
ProvostWarren William Burggren
(age 61)
Academic staff1,442[4]
Students35,694[5]
Undergraduates28,282[4]
Postgraduates7,412[4]
LocationDenton, Texas, United States
CampusSuburban 875 acres (3.54 km2)[1]
Former namesTexas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute (1890–1894)
North Texas Normal College (1894–1901)
North Texas State Normal College (1901–1923)
North Texas State Teachers College (1923–1949)
North Texas State College (1949–1961)
North Texas State University (1961–1988)
Colors     Green and      White[6]
AthleticsNorth Texas Mean Green
SportsNCAA Division IFBS
NicknameMean Green
MascotScrappy the Eagle
AffiliationsSun Belt Conference
Websitewww.unt.edu
Official watermark for the University of North Texas
All enrollment and employment figures are as of the fall 2011 semester.

The University of North Texas (UNT) is a public research, liberal arts, fine arts, performing arts, and professional institution of higher learning based in Denton. Ten colleges, two schools, and an academy comprise the University and its research is driven by nearly 50 doctoral degree programs. The Denton campus has an annual operating budget in excess of $336.5 million[2]

Founded as a private teachers college in 1890 and adopted by the State in 1899, the university is the flagship of four institutions governed by University of North Texas System — a system established in 2003 by the 78th Texas Legislature. In 2011, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board identified UNT as one of eight Emerging Research Institutions in its accountability system. Certified enrollment as of the fall of 2011 was 35,694,[7] the fourth largest in the state. For the 2011 academic year, the university awarded 8,608 degrees, of which 24 percent were at the graduate level. North Texas awarded 459 PhD degrees from fiscal years 2009 to 2011.[8]

Contents

Academics

The 13 colleges and schools offer 97 bachelors, 101 masters and 50 doctoral degree programs. The student-faculty ratio at UNT is 23:1, and 28.8 percent of its classes consist of fewer than 20 students. The most popular majors include Business, Management, Marketing, Communication, Journalism, English, Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies, and Visual and Performing Arts.[9] The U.S. News & World Report's top 100 programs in Clinical Psychology (99), Fine Arts (58), Library and Information Studies (17), Health Librarianship (3), School Library Media (11), Service for Children and Youth (13), Physician Assistants (38), Public Affairs (57), City Management and Urban Policy (9), and Rehabilitation Counseling (13).[9] The Denton campus has eleven colleges, two schools, and one academy. The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Colleges & schools

  1. College of Arts and Sciences
  2. College of Business
  3. College of Education
  4. College of Engineering
  5. College of Information
  6. College of Merchandising, Hospitality and Tourism
  7. College of Music
  8. College of Public Affairs and Community Service
  9. College of Visual Arts and Design
  10. Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism
  11. Honors College
  12. Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science (TAMS)
  13. Toulouse Graduate School

Public Affairs and Community Service

Twenty-nine years ago (1983), North Texas developed the nation's first comprehensive degree program in emergency and disaster management. The baccalaureate degree is offered by the College of Public Affairs and Community Service, but incorporates interdisciplinary curricula from other colleges that includes applied philosophy and environmental ethics. The degree is designed for management practitioners and is collaborative with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Region VI — based in Denton — which oversees Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Denton became home to FEMA when its predecessor, the Office of Civil Defense and Mobilization, constructed the nation's first Federal underground defense center in 1959.[10]

Engineering & applied sciences

The University is home to several national centers and institutes, including the Net-Centric Software and Systems Center — an NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center; the Semiconductor Research Corporation, Center for Electronic Materials Processing and Integration; the Institute of Applied Science; the Center for Advanced Scientific Computing and Modeling; the Texas Center for Digital Knowledge; and the Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity. UNT has developed multiple state-of-the-art research facilities, including the Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), one of the nation’s most extensive facilities for powerful materials characterization and analysis; a high-performance computational facility; and a cleanroomnanofabrication research facility. UNT's research extends outside its campuses as well, with field stations nearby at a lake and far away in southern Chile. UNT is developing a research park (UNT Discovery Park) with technology incubator facilities on a 290-acre property near the main campus. UNT offers classes in downtown Dallas — 35 miles away — and is developing a Design Research Center in the heart of the Dallas design district.[11]

Doctorates

Science doctorates: In 2006, the National Science Foundation ranked the Denton campus 122nd out of 444 academic institutions for number of science and engineering doctorates awarded (most of the degrees from UNT were in science, given that the College of Engineering was founded in 2003).[12]

Non-science & engineering doctorates: Of the 37 post-baccalaureate institutions in Texas surveyed by the National Science Foundation, UNT ranked third in 2006, behind The University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University, for non-science and engineering doctorates awarded.[12] The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classifies the University of North Texas as a research university with high research activity.[13] Based on the number of non-science and engineering PhDs awarded at 2,722 national institutions of higher learning in the country, North Texas was ranked as follows:

Music

Winspear Auditorium, University of North Texas College of Music (photo by Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA, courtesy of Holzman Moss Architecture)

The College of Music is internationally recognized as a comprehensive institution. Its roots go back one hundred and twenty-two years, when North Texas was founded. The College is organized by discipline in eight academic divisions, offering fully mounted opera, early music, chamber music, the Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia, and the Center for Music and Medicine. The College awards bachelor of music, master of music, Doctor of Philosophy, and Doctors of Musical Arts degrees and non-degree graduate artist certificates. Concentrations include performance, music composition, music education, music history, music theory, jazz studies. The music library, founded in 1941, has one of the largest music collections in the United States, with over 300,000 volumes of books, periodicals, scores, and approximately 900,000 sound recordings.[15] The college has the largest enrollment of any music institution accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.[16] It has been among the largest music institutions of higher learning in North America since the 1940s. North Texas has been a member of the National Association of Schools of Music for 73 years.[17] Since the 1970s, approximately one-third of all North Texas music students have been enrolled at the graduate level. North Texas was first in the world to offer a degree in jazz studies. U.S. News and World Report, in its annual America's Best Graduate Schools, ranked the jazz studies program as the best in the country every year from 1994, when it began ranking graduate jazz programs, to 1997, when it retired the category.[18] The One O'Clock Lab Band has been nominated for 6 Grammy Awards.

Other academic highlights

Two new colleges, a school, and an institute

Two colleges, a school, and an institute were founded in the last nine years:

Brief history

Joshua Crittenden Chilton founded the University of North Texas in 1890 as Texas Normal College and Teachers Training Institute, a private teachers college and music conservatory. It was originally housed in leased facilities above a hardware store. In 1893, Chilton turned the school over to John Jackson Crumley. Renamed North Texas Normal College, the school was turned over to Menter Bradley Terrill in 1894. By 1899, the school had been made a state institution by the Texas Legislature, becoming North Texas State Normal College under its fourth president, Joel Sutton Kendall. In 1923, at the suggestion of William Hershel Bruce, the school underwent its fourth name change, becoming North Texas State Teachers' College. Under president Weston Joseph McConnell, the college grew tremendously; the first master's degrees were awarded in 1936 and the school was given its own Board of Regents in 1949, changing its name once again to North Texas State College. James Carl (J.C.) Matthews, president from 1951 to 1968, also oversaw important development. In 1961, the college became North Texas State University, and by 1964 was approved by the Texas Commission on Higher Education to begin several doctoral programs. In 1988, the university adopted its current name, the University of North Texas.[21]

Student life

The Willis Library

Student residence halls

Mozart Square
There are 13 residence halls on the Denton campus. UNT also offers the Residents Engaged in Academic Living (REAL) Communities program. The REAL communities offer students the ability to live with other residents in their major, and allow them to interact with each other and participate in programs that are geared toward their major or discipline.[22]

Mascot

"In High Places" is a prominent representation of the eagle on campus.
UNT's mascot, the American eagle, was adopted on February 1, 1922, as a result of a student-faculty council debate and ensuing student election.[23] The selection is said to have reflected the student population's ideals of individual liberty and freedom of expression.
The eagle has had three nicknames, beginning with "Scrappy" in 1950.[24] The human costumed eagle character, launched in 1963, carried the name "Scrappy" until 1974 — during the throes of the Vietnam War — when students adopted the name "Eppy," because it sounded less warlike. Since then, the name has switched back and forth, from Eppy to Scrappy; but for the last seventeen years, the name "Scrappy" has endured.

Nickname

The name "Mean Green," now in its forty-fifth year, was adopted by fans and media in 1966 for a North Texas football defensive squad that finished the season second in the nation against the rush.[25] That season, Joe Greene,[26] then a sophomore at North Texas, played left defensive tackle on the football team and competed in track and field (shot put). The nickname "Mean Joe Greene" caught-on during his first year with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1969 when the fan base mistakenly assumed that "Mean Green" was derived from a nickname they thought he had inherited while at North Texas. The athletic department, media, and fans loved the novelty of a Joe Greene's surname being a homophone of the university's school color. By 1968, "Mean Green" was on the back of shirts, buttons, bumper stickers, and the cover of the North Texas football football brochure.[27]

Fight Song

Francis Edwin Stroup (1909–2010)[28] emerged in 1939 — ten years after graduating from North Texas — as the winning composer of a university sponsored fight song competition organized by Floyd Graham.[29] The song, Fight, North Texas, has endured for seventy-three years and the lyrics have changed minimally to reflect the name changes of the university. Stroup went on to compose songs for Drake University, the University of Wyoming and the University of Chicago. Stroup, while teaching at Northern Illinois University in 1961, also wrote the Huskie Fight Song, which was adopted as the university's fight song in 1963.[30][31][32][33][34] Stroup — a collegiate academician who played piano mostly by ear and neither majored nor worked in music — lived to be 101, a number exceeding the songs he composed by one digit.

Alma Mater

In 1919, Julia Smith (1905–1989), while a music student, and Charles Kirby Langford (1903–1931), then a third-year letterman on the football team and an outstanding overall athlete, composed Glory to the Green and White which was adopted as the school's alma mater in 1922. Smith wrote the music and Langford wrote the lyrics.[35][36]

Other traditions

The Spirit Bell is a 2,000 lb (910 kg) bell originally brought from Michigan in 1891 to signal class changes and curfew. Members of the Talons spirit group later began running it up and down the field at football games; it was retired to the University Union in 1982 after it developed a crack. A 1,600 lb (730 kg) Spirit Bell is currently in use at games.[21]
McConnell Tower, the clock tower atop the Hurley Administration Building at the center of campus, is bathed in green light for each victory by a UNT athletic team. It appears on the official class ring with two different times on its faces: 1:00 (for the One O'Clock Lab Band) and 7:00 (the 1892 curfew time for the school's students).[21]
The eagle talon hand gesture is made by curling the thumb, index and middle fingers forward, leaving the ring finger and pinky closed against the palm.[21]
The homecoming bonfire bonfire is built with thousands of pallets donated by Miller Brewing of Denton and the local Peterbilt plant. The pallets are stacked in a 40-foot by 40-foot footprint then stacked to a final height of 25 feet. It is assembled by members of the Talons spirit group the week before Homecoming and is lit on the Friday night of Homecoming week (when a burn ban is not in effect).[21]
Boomer the Cannon, hand crafted from solid oak on the Denton campus, the 7/8th scale M1841 6 pound, smooth bore muzzleloader cannon has been used to signify scores by the Mean Green since Fall 1970. Since that time "Boomer the Cannon" has gone through three different phases of restoration by Talon alumni. The final was in the Fall of 2007 in which the final phase saw him fitted with a custom Limber to assist with transportation and equipment handling.[21]
The Green Machine is a green 1931 Ford Model A Tudor Sedan and is driven by members of the Talons Cannon Crew at home football games and special events. This should not be confused with the Mean Green Machine, a large mechanical eagle trailed by remote panel in a truck, controlled by three physics students, that made Homecoming and other appearances between 1968 and 1976. The Green Machine is currently undergoing an overhaul by members of Talons Cannon Crew.[21]
"In High Places," is a 22 ft (6.7 m) tall bronze statue of a flying eagle created by Gerald Balciar. It is sometimes decorated in green for school spirit. It was dedicated during the university's centennial celebrations in 1990.[21]

Social Greek organizations

The social Greek community is made-up of four councils that oversee 39 fraternities and sororities.[37] Four percent of students of both genders are members of social fraternities and sororities.[38]

Broadcast & print media

Intercollegiate athletics

UNT's Athletic Teams are commonly referred to as the Mean Green

As of 2012, North Texas sponsored fifteen athletic teams that compete at the intercollegiate level of NCAA Division I — for men: football; for men and women: basketball, track & field, cross country, and golf; for women only: Diving, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tennis, and Volleyball. UNT has been a member of the Sun Belt Conference since 2001. Beginning fall 2013, UNT will compete as a member of Conference USA.

Football

In its 99–year history, North Texas has won 24 conference championships, with the last four occurring from 2001 to 2004 in the Sun Belt Conference.[42] The team has appeared in seven bowl games, winning two — including the 2002 New Orleans Bowl. Dan McCarney is the current head coach. From 1952 to 2010, home football games were played at Fouts Field. In 2011, UNT began playing in newly constructed Apogee Stadium.[43]

Men's basketball

North Texas won the 2006-2007 Sun Belt Conference championship and advanced to the NCAA Tournament. The season marked the beginning of a four consecutive seasons of 20–plus wins. North Texas won the Sun Belt Conference championship again during the 2009–2010 season, and again, advanced to the NCAA Tournament. The 2011–2012 season marks the thirty-ninth season that the UNT Coliseum has served as the home for Men's basketball.

Notable alumni, faculty & staff

Today, the University of North Texas has approximately 326,000 living alumni and has over 208,000 alums residing in the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex.[44] A significant number of notable alumni have succeeded in music, including Roy Orbison, Meat Loaf, Tom "Bones" Malone and "Blue Lou" Marini (both members of The Blues Brothers Band and the Saturday Night Live Band), Lecrae Moore ('02) Reach Records, Grammy Award-winners Don Henley, Norah Jones, Pat Boone and Duain Wolfe, conductor of the Chicago Symphony Chorus.[45] Jazz saxophonist Billy Harper received his bachelor's degree in music in 1965.[46] KDGE disc jockey Josh Venable attended the university.[47]

Notable former North Texas athletes include American Football League MVP Abner Haynes, Pro Football Hall of Fame member "Mean" Joe Greene, and PGA champion Don January. Professional wrestlers Stone Cold Steve Austin, David and Kevin Von Erich are also alums of North Texas athletics, under the names of Steve Williams (football), David Adkisson (basketball) and Kevin Adkisson (football) respectively.[citation needed]

North Texas political alumni include Michael C. Burgess, current congressman for the 26th Texas district; Adel al-Jubeir, Saudi ambassador to the United States and former adviser to the Royal Court of Saudi Arabia; and former congressman Ray Roberts of the United States House of Representatives, Texas District 4 (and namesake of nearby Lake Ray Roberts).

Notable professors include former US House of Representatives Majority Leader Dick Armey and wind symphony conductor Eugene Corporon, who is considered an authority on wind/band music repertoire.[citation needed]

Other significant alumni include journalist and author Bill Moyers, former 1971 Miss America Phyllis George, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Larry McMurtry, and Dr. Phil McGraw ('79) from the American television show Dr. Phil.

Green initiative

2005UNT launched the first PhD program in Environmental Ethics in the world.
2008UNT became the first large public university in Texas to sign the "American College and University President's Climate Commitment" (ACUPCC). As of September 2012, twenty-four of the 658 signatory institutions of higher learning were from Texas. Of those twenty-four, five were full undergraduate-graduate institutions (2 private, 3 public). Of those five, UNT was the largest. The objectives include achieving carbon neutrality by 2040 and ensuring that all new university buildings and facilities meet a minimum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver rating by the U.S. Green Building Council[48]
2011The Life Science Complex, newly constructed, became UNT's first LEED certified structure, earning a Gold rating. The Complex is a state-of-the-art research facility that houses the university's biochemistry, molecular biology, developmental physiology, genetics and plant sciences programs. The building features four climate-controlled rooftop greenhouses and one of the country's most sophisticated aquatics laboratories with more than 2,500 tanks.
2011Apogee Stadium, the one-year-old football stadium, became the first newly built sports stadium in the world to earn a Platinum LEED certification, the highest of four certifications.[49] The facility features wind turbines, eco-friendly building materials materials, and native landscape architecture.
2012The Business Leadership Building (newly constructed) received Gold LEED certification.
2012UNT installed electric vehicle charging stations at two student parking lots
2012The Princeton Review's Guide to 322 Green Colleges, 2012 Edition, listed UNT for the second consecutive year, citing its top 17-percent ranking among green-compliant universities nationwide under ACUPCC. The article stated that forty percent of the energy on campus is derived from renewable sources, and 43 percent of the buildings have undergone energy retrofits. The campus has posted strong numbers in recycling: since 2009, the university has recycled nearly 1,000 tons of waste materials. UNT offers graduate degrees in Environmental Science and Public Administration and Management.[50]
2013UNT's Highland Street parking garage (newly constructed) received Gold LEED certification.

References

  1. ^ a b "U.S. News and World Report 2012 Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. 2011. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/unt-3594. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Total operating revenues for the fiscal year ending August 30, 2011. Harris, Andrew (2011-11-20) (PDF). Financial Report of the University of North Texas (Report). Denton, Texas: University of North Texas. http://untsystem.edu/ereports/untafr2011.pdf. 
  3. ^ Boyce, Julia (2012). "UNT Board of Regents". University of North Texas. http://untsystem.edu/regents/profiles.htm. Retrieved 2012-02-29. 
  4. ^ a b c 2012 Texas Public Higher Education Almanac, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), p.45.
  5. ^ Texas Higher Education Data: Comparison of University Enrollments (certified), THECB, 15 December 2011.
  6. ^ "Indentity Guide". University of North Texas. http://www.unt.edu/identityguide/web-electronic.htm. Retrieved 2011-09-12. 
  7. ^ Texas Higher Education Data: Comparison of University Enrollments (certified), THECB, December 15, 2011
  8. ^ 2012 Texas Public Higher Education Almanac, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin
  9. ^ a b University of North Texas at U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges rankings
  10. ^ Georgia Caraway & Cupit, Images of America: Denton, Arcadia Publishing, pg. 43 (2009) OCLC 429027254 ICCN 2009928046 ISBN 9780738578545
  11. ^ Strategic Plan for Research: 2010–2010, The University of North Texas
  12. ^ a b National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Statistics, Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2006
  13. ^ Classifications, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 2004
  14. ^ Lori Thurgood, Mary J. Golladay, and Susan T. Hill, US Doctorates in the 20th Century: Special Report, National Science Foundation, June 2006
  15. ^ Warren Henry, The Grove Dictionary of American Music, 2nd edition, February 24, 2010, Oxford University Press; also www.oxfordmusiconline.com OCLC 774021205 ISBN 9780195314281 ISBN 019531428X ISBN 9780199739257 ISBN 0199739250
  16. ^ HEADS Data – Special Report, 2010–11, National Association of Schools of Music
  17. ^ James Lloyd Rogers (1926–2006), The Story of North Texas, University of North Texas Press (c2002)
  18. ^ US News and World Report
  19. ^ HEADS Data – Special Report, 2010-11, National Association of Schools of Art and Design
  20. ^ Huseyin Durmaz, Bilal Sevinc, Ahmet Sait Yayla, Siddik Ekici Understanding and Responding to Terrorism, pg. 101, IOS Press (2007) ISBN 9781586037406
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h Traditions at University of North Texas
  22. ^ UNT Housing - REAL
  23. ^ "UNT InHouse" (faculty newsletter), December 22, 2005 (retrieved September 17, 2007) Unt.edu
  24. ^ North Texas College Plans Huge Bonfire, Dallas Morning News, November 14, 1950, Sec. I, pg. 8
  25. ^ "Eagles are 19-Point Favorite", Denton Record-Chronicle, Sep 21, 1967, pg 10
  26. ^ ""Mean" Joe Greene". http://sports.jrank.org/pages/1772/Greene-Joe--Mean-Joe-Greene.html. 
  27. ^ Mike Cochran (AP) (John Michael Cochran; born 1936), Mean Green Same as Nickname, Abilene Reporter-News, September 1, 1968
  28. ^ Leaders in Education, Fifth edition, R.R. Bowker, New York (1974) OCLC 2167720 ISBN 0835206998 9780835206990
  29. ^ NTSC Song Author Can't Read Music — Just Pecks Out Songs, Denton Record-Chronicle, Sec. 2, pg. 1
  30. ^ Dana Herra, Fight song composer turns 100, Daily Chronicle (Illinois), September 7, 2009]
  31. ^ Kate Schott, Stroup, 101, wrote NIU fight song, Daily Chronicle (Illinois), December 3, 2010
  32. ^ Jill King, Living knows no season — Composer of Fight North Texas crafts a life full of song, The North Texan, Summer 2008
  33. ^ NIU mourns passing of Francis Stroup, Former men's swimming coach penned lyrics to Huskie Fight Song, NIU Today, December 1, 2010
  34. ^ William E Studwell & Bruce R Schueneman, College fight songs II : a supplementary anthology, Haworth Press (2001) OCLC 45905154 ISBN 078900920X ISBN 9780789009203 ISBN 0789009218 ISBN 9780789009210
  35. ^ Charles Langford, The Portal to Texas History, University of North Texas Libraries
  36. ^ Glory to the Green and White: Alma Mater Song, by Julia Smith, Mowbray Music Publishers, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, distributed by Theodore Presser Company (1969) OCLC 4418069
  37. ^ UNT Greek Life About Us
  38. ^ The College Board's information on Housing and Campus Life
  39. ^ KNTU-FM Reaches Air: NT Radio Becomes Reality, Denton Record-Chronicle, November 4, 1969
  40. ^ North Texas Daily website
  41. ^ North Texas Television
  42. ^ "North Texas Championships". College Football Data Warehouse. http://cfbdatawarehouse.com/data/div_ia/sunbelt/north_texas/championships.php. Retrieved 2007-08-20. 
  43. ^ "Houston Cougars vs. North Texas Mean Green". ESPN. 
  44. ^ "North Texan Online 2005". University of North Texas. http://www.unt.edu/northtexan/archives/s05/branding.htm. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  45. ^ "College of Music Alumni". University of North Texas. http://www.unt.edu/pais/music/alumni.htm. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  46. ^ "2008 Alumni Awards Recipients". University of North Texas. http://www.unt.edu/development/alumniawards/2008/recipients.htm. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  47. ^ "Music potpourri". University of North Texas. 2001. http://www.unt.edu/northtexan/archives/p01/radiovoices2.htm. 
  48. ^ "UNT’s Business Leadership Building Receives Gold LEED Certification". Denton Record-Chronicle. 2012-02-15. http://www.dentonrc.com/local-news/education/higher-education-headlines/20120215-unt-briefs.ece. Retrieved 2012-07-03. 
  49. ^ Vito, Brett (2011-10-21). "Stadium Garners Ultimate Ranking". Denton Record-Chronicle. http://www.dentonrc.com/sports/colleges/colleges-headlines/20111021-stadium-garners-ultimate-ranking.ece. Retrieved 2012-06-29. 
  50. ^ The Princeton Review's Guide to 322 Green Colleges, 2012 Edition, Jeremy Seltzer, lead author (2012)

External links

Coordinates: 33°12′43″N 97°08′57″W / 33.211996°N 97.149138°W / 33.211996; -97.149138