North Central Conference

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North Central Conference
(NCC)
North Central Conference logo
Established1922
Dissolved2008
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision II
Members8
Sports fielded18 (men's: 9; women's: 9)
RegionMidwest
HeadquartersSioux Falls, South Dakota
Websitehttp://northcentral.prestosports.com
Locations
North Central Conference locations
 
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North Central Conference
(NCC)
North Central Conference logo
Established1922
Dissolved2008
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision II
Members8
Sports fielded18 (men's: 9; women's: 9)
RegionMidwest
HeadquartersSioux Falls, South Dakota
Websitehttp://northcentral.prestosports.com
Locations
North Central Conference locations

The North Central Conference (NCC), also known as North Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, was a college athletic conference which operated in the north central United States. It participated in the NCAA's Division II.

History[edit]

The NCC was formed in 1922. Charter members of the NCC were South Dakota State College (now South Dakota State University), College of St. Thomas (now the University of St. Thomas), Des Moines University, Creighton University, North Dakota Agricultural College (now North Dakota State University), the University of North Dakota, Morningside College, the University of South Dakota, and Nebraska Wesleyan University.

The University of Northern Iowa was a member of the NCC from 1934 until 1978. UNI currently competes in Division I in the Missouri Valley Conference; in FCS football, it competes in the Missouri Valley Football Conference. In 2002 Morningside College left the NCC to join the NAIA. The University of Northern Colorado left the conference in 2003, followed in 2004 by North Dakota State University and South Dakota State University. These three schools all transitioned their athletics programs from Division II to Division I; they became founding members of the Division I FCS Great West Football Conference, which started play in the fall of 2004. Since that time, Northern Colorado moved on to the Big Sky Conference in all sports in 2006. In the fall of 2006, North Dakota State and South Dakota State were admitted to The Summit League; they have also moved on to rejoin old conference mate Northern Iowa in the Missouri Valley Football Conference.

It was announced on November 29, 2006 that the 2007-08 athletic season would be the final season for the NCC, and would cease operations on July 1, 2008.[1]

Member schools[edit]

Charter members[edit]

The North Central Conference began in 1921 with nine charter members:[5]

InstitutionLocationNicknameFoundedTypeEnrollmentJoinedLeftCurrent Conference
Creighton UniversityOmaha, NebraskaBluejays1878Private/Catholic6,71619211928Big East
Des Moines UniversityDes Moines, Iowa?1864Private/Baptistn/a19211926n/a*
Morningside CollegeSioux City, IowaMustangs1894Private/Methodist1,14919212002GPAC (NAIA)
Nebraska Wesleyan UniversityLincoln, NebraskaPrairie Wolves1887Private/Methodist1,60119211926GPAC (NAIA)
University of North DakotaGrand Forks, North DakotaFighting Sioux1883Public13,81719212008Big Sky
North Dakota State UniversityFargo, North DakotaBison1890Public13,22919212004Summit (all-sports)
MVFC (football)
University of St. ThomasSt. Paul, MinnesotaTommies1885Private/Catholic10,53419211928MIAC
University of South DakotaVermillion, South DakotaCoyotes1862Public8,64119212008Summit (all-sports)
MVFC (football)
South Dakota State UniversityBrookings, South DakotaJackrabbits1881Public12,81619212004Summit (all-sports)
MVFC (football)

* Des Moines University closed in 1929.[6]

Additional members[edit]

InstitutionLocationNicknameFoundedTypeEnrollmentJoinedLeftCurrent Conference
Augustana CollegeSioux Falls, South DakotaVikings1860Private/Lutheran (ELCA)1,65019412008NSIC
University of Minnesota DuluthDuluth, MinnesotaBulldogs1902, 1947Public10,49720042008NSIC
Minnesota State University, MankatoMankato, MinnesotaMavericks1868Public15,6491968,
1981
1976,
2008
NSIC
University of Nebraska at OmahaOmaha, NebraskaMavericks1908Public14,0931934
1976
1946
2008
Summit
University of Northern ColoradoGreeley, ColoradoBears1889Public12,39219782003Big Sky
University of Northern IowaCedar Falls, IowaPanthers1876Public14,07019341978Missouri Valley
St. Cloud State UniversitySt. Cloud, MinnesotaHuskies1869Public17,23119812008NSIC

Membership timeline[edit]

Western Washington UniversityCentral Washington UniversityUniversity of Minnesota DuluthSt. Cloud StateUniversity of Northern ColoradoMinnesota State University, MankatoAugustana College (South Dakota)University of Nebraska OmahaUniversity of Nebraska OmahaUniversity of Northern IowaSouth Dakota State UniversityUniversity of South DakotaUniversity of St. ThomasNorth Dakota State UniversityUniversity of North DakotaNebraska Wesleyan UniversityMorningside CollegeDes Moines CollegeCreighton University

Membership evolution[edit]

Sports[edit]

The NCC sponsored baseball, men's and women's basketball, football, cross-country, golf, soccer, softball, swimming & diving, tennis, track & field, volleyball, and wrestling.

Six of the seven members of the NCC sponsored Division I ice hockey, and five still do. In men's hockey, after a major conference realignment that took effect in 2013, Minnesota–Duluth, Nebraska–Omaha, North Dakota, and St. Cloud State field teams in the National Collegiate Hockey Conference, while Minnesota State–Mankato is a member of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA). Before the realignment, all of these schools had been members of the WCHA for men's hockey. All of these schools, except for Omaha, have women's teams in the WCHA (Omaha women's hockey is a club sport). The women's side of the WCHA was not affected by this realignment.

Associate members[edit]

Football - Western Washington University, Central Washington University

Women's Swimming and Diving - Colorado Mines, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Metro State (CO)

Men's Swimming and Diving - Colorado Mines, Metro State (CO)

Men's Tennis - Winona State

Conference football stadiums[edit]

SchoolFootball StadiumStadium capacity
AugustanaHoward Wood Field10,000
Central WashingtonTomlinson Stadium4,000
Minnesota DuluthGriggs Field at James S. Malosky Stadium4,000
Minnesota State, MankatoBlakeslee Stadium7,500
Nebraska-OmahaAl F. Caniglia Field9,500
North DakotaAlerus Center13,500
North Dakota StateFargodome19,000
St. Cloud StateHusky Stadium4,198
South DakotaDakotaDome10,000
South Dakota StateCoughlin-Alumni Stadium16,000
Western WashingtonCivic Stadium5,000

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thomas: NCC will fold in summer 2008". Forum Communications Co. 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2006-11-30. 
  2. ^ "USD to Move Athletic Programs to Division I". University of South Dakota. 2006. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  3. ^ "Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Expands to 14 Teams". Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  4. ^ "MIAA CEO Council ratifies decision to add Nebraska-Omaha". Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-07-05. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]

External links[edit]