Nobuhiro Watsuki

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Self portrait
Born(1970-05-26)May 26, 1970
Nagaoka, Niigata, Japan
NationalityJapanese
OccupationManga artist
Known forRurouni Kenshin
 
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Self portrait
Born(1970-05-26)May 26, 1970
Nagaoka, Niigata, Japan
NationalityJapanese
OccupationManga artist
Known forRurouni Kenshin

Nobuhiro Watsuki (和月 伸宏 Watsuki Nobuhiro?, born May 26, 1970) is a Japanese manga artist, best known for his samurai-themed series Rurouni Kenshin. He once worked as an assistant for his favorite author Takeshi Obata.

Contents

Biography

When Watsuki was in middle school, he practiced kendo. He still drew Manga but also enjoyed sports. Watsuki admits that he was "So weak in fact, that I was an embarrassment to my 183 centimeters of height" (about 6 feet). Watsuki never won a kendo match. He was once chosen to be a starter after a teammate was suspended for causing an uproar. Watsuki grew frustrated with kendo, and eventually quit. When he was challenged to come up with a new character for Rurouni Kenshin, he used his outlook on kendo for a base of Myōjin Yahiko.[1]

Nobuhiro Watsuki has had many works in the past. In high school he won the Hop Step award for his work on his comic sleeve he called Podmark. Not much is known about Podmark because it has not been translated to English. Later on, Watsuki was an assistant in the work of Mashin Bōken Tan Lamp-Lamp (Arabian Genie Adventure Lamp-Lamp). The model for Sagara Sanosuke was based on a version of Lamp.[2] In 1994 a new sleeve was created and published in Weekly Shōnen Jump. It seems that this was the first sleeve about Rurouni Kenshin.

When not working on manga, Watsuki enjoys playing video games, reading other manga, and watching television. His favorite American comic book is X-Men because he likes the action. His favorite anime (other than his own) is Neon Genesis Evangelion. He likes video games like Samurai Spirits and things of that sort. He also enjoys action movies like Die Hard and The Matrix.

Watsuki describes himself as "pro-dōjinshi" and asks fans to send fan comics.[3]

Real-world inspirations

Watsuki bases many of his characters on historical figures, characters from other manga/anime, and video games series. For example, Himura Kenshin was based on Kawakami Gensai,[4] one of the hitokiri (assassins) during the Bakumatsu (Japanese revolution). He was the master of the sword style called shiranui-ryū. Gensai is famous for killing the famous idealist Sakuma Shozan. Four years after the revolution ended, Gensai was falsely accused of a crime and was executed.[5] Watsuki admires Kenshin for his desire to do good in honor of those whom he had to kill so the Meiji government could exist.[5]

In addition, Saitō Hajime was based on the historical Saitō Hajime, a member of the Shinsengumi although Watsuki admitted altering him to the point of fans complaint.[6] Several other characters, most notably Sagara Sanosuke, Shinomori Aoshi, and Seta Sōjirō, are also loosely based on certain figures among the Shinsengumi.[7] Okita Sōji, Ōkubo Toshimichi, and Katsura Kogorō were among numerous other historical figures who made appearances in the story. Yukishiro Enishi's minion Gein was based on puppeteer and serial killer Ed Gein, as stated in "The Secret Life of Characters #47", volume 24.[8]

Works

  See main article: Rurouni Kenshin.

 See main article: Gun Blaze West.

 See main article: Buso Renkin.

 See main article: Embalming (manga).

Video Game Designs

Other

Buso Renkin anime, voice of Buhiro Watsukino in episode 7.

Notable assistants

Nobuhiro Watsuki is known for mentoring several manga artists who eventually got serialized.[10] For a while there was a time when the most popular Jump manga authors were all his assistants.[11]

References

  1. ^ Watsuki, Nobuhiro. "The Secret Life of Characters (3) Myōjin Yahiko," Rurouni Kenshin Volume 1. VIZ Media. 103.
  2. ^ Watsuki, Nobuhiro. "The Secret Life of Characters (6) Sagara Sanosuke," Rurouni Kenshin Volume 2. VIZ Media. 48.
  3. ^ Watsuki, Nobuhiro. Rurouni Kenshin Volume 2. VIZ Media. 175.
  4. ^ Viz Graphic Novel Ruroni Kenshin Vol. 1
  5. ^ a b Viz Graphic Novel Ruroni Kenshin vol. 1
  6. ^ Viz Graphic Novel Ruroni Kenshin Vol. 7
  7. ^ Viz Graphic Novel Ruroni Kenshin Vol. 1 and 7
  8. ^ Viz Graphic Novel Ruroni Kenshin Vol. 24
  9. ^ a b c Watsuki, Nobuhiro. Rurouni Kenshin Volume 28. Viz Media. 155.
  10. ^ http://www.ktr.to/Comic/assistant.html
  11. ^ http://www.thegrandline.com/odatengoku.htm

External links