Nicola Pagett

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Nicola Pagett
Born(1945-06-15) 15 June 1945 (age 69)
Cairo, Egypt
Other namesNicola Scott
Spouse(s)Graham Swannell (divorced, 1998)
 
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Nicola Pagett
Born(1945-06-15) 15 June 1945 (age 69)
Cairo, Egypt
Other namesNicola Scott
Spouse(s)Graham Swannell (divorced, 1998)

Nicola Pagett (born as Nicola Mary Scott, 15 June 1945) is a British actress. She is best known for her role as Elizabeth Bellamy in the 1970s TV drama series Upstairs, Downstairs.

Early life[edit]

Born in Cairo, Egypt, Nicola Pagett spent most of her childhood out of Britain — in Hong Kong, Cyprus and Japan, the family moving with her father who worked for a major oil company. She was educated at Saint Maur International School, in Yokohama, Japan, the oldest international school in Asia. In 1962 Nicola entered Britain's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where she studied for two years.[1]

Career[edit]

In 1964 Nicola appeared in several productions with Worthing Repertory Company. Then her performance in the television play Girl in the Picture caught the attention of Sir Robert Helpmann who cast her to tour with Vivien Leigh in the stage play La Contessa.[1]

After starring in the British series Upstairs, Downstairs, Pagett played the title role in a 1977 BBC adaptation of Anna Karenina and also gave a memorable performance in David Nobbs's TV series A Bit of a Do. She appeared in a variety of films including The Viking Queen (1967), Frankenstein: The True Story (1973) Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), Operation Daybreak (1975) and Oliver's Story (1978). She appeared in leading roles (as the young Irish bride Conor) in the 1980 Australian mini-series The Timeless Land[1] and in the 1994 to 1995 sitcom Ain't Misbehavin'.

Personal life[edit]

In 1995, while appearing in What The Butler Saw at the National Theatre, she began behaving erratically and was ultimately diagnosed as having acute manic depression. During this time she developed an obsession with Alastair Campbell,[2] the then Prime Minister Tony Blair's chief press secretary, and, according to Adam Boulton, Alastair Campbell used this obsession to distract attention from negative headlines about the 1998 Labour Party Conference.[3] She subsequently chronicled her experiences with manic depression in a 1998 book entitled Diamonds Behind My Eyes.

Family[edit]

She was married to playwright Graham Swannell; the couple had a daughter, but they divorced in 1998.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Timeless Land" from the ABC television series, Australian Broadcasting Commission, Sydney, 1980. ISBN 0-642-97469-1
  2. ^ Adams, Tim (1999-09-26). "Is the media's obsession with Alastair Campbell damaging the Government?". The Guardian (The Observer). 
  3. ^ Boulton, Adam (2008-09-22). media "If in doubt, lie". The Guardian. 

External links[edit]