Nicholson Baker

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Nicholson Baker
Nicholson Baker, photographed Fall 2013, South Berwick, Maine.jpg
Nicholson Baker, Fall 2013.
Born(1957-01-07) January 7, 1957 (age 57)
New York City
EducationEastman School of Music
Alma materHaverford College
GenresNovels; Essays
 
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Nicholson Baker
Nicholson Baker, photographed Fall 2013, South Berwick, Maine.jpg
Nicholson Baker, Fall 2013.
Born(1957-01-07) January 7, 1957 (age 57)
New York City
EducationEastman School of Music
Alma materHaverford College
GenresNovels; Essays

Nicholson Baker (born January 7, 1957) is an American writer of fiction and non-fiction. His fiction generally de-emphasizes narrative in favor of careful description and characterization. He often focuses on minute inspection of his characters' and narrators' stream of consciousness. Baker has written about poetry, literature, library systems, history, politics, time manipulation, youth, and sex. He has written about libraries getting rid of books and newspapers and created the American Newspaper Repository. He received a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2001 for his nonfiction book Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper and the International Hermann Hesse Price (Germany) in 2014. Baker has also written about and edited at Wikipedia. A pacifist, he has also written about the build up to World War II.

Life and career[edit]

Nicholson Baker was born in 1957 in New York City and spent much of his youth in the Rochester, New York area. He studied briefly at the Eastman School of Music and received a B.A. in English from Haverford College.

Baker is a fervent critic of what he perceives as libraries' unnecessary destruction of paper-based media. He wrote several vehement articles in The New Yorker critical of the San Francisco Public Library for sending thousands of books to a landfill, eliminating card catalogs, and destroying old books and newspapers in favor of microfilm. In 1997, Baker received the San Francisco–based James Madison Freedom of Information Award in recognition of these efforts.

In 1999, Baker established a non-profit corporation, the American Newspaper Repository, to rescue old newspapers from destruction by libraries.[1] In 2001 he published Double Fold, in which he accuses certain librarians of lying about the decay of materials and being obsessed with technological fads, at the expense of both the public and historical preservation.

Baker describes himself as having "always had pacifist leanings."[2]

In March 2008, Baker reviewed John Broughton's Wikipedia: The Missing Manual in the New York Review of Books. In the review, Baker described Wikipedia's beginnings, its culture, and his own editing activities under the username "Wageless".[3] His article "How I fell in love with Wikipedia" was published in The Guardian newspaper in the UK on April 10, 2008.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Baker lives with his wife and two children in South Berwick, Maine.

Books by Nicholson Baker[edit]

Books[edit]

Novels[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ American Newspaper Repository
  2. ^ McGrath, Charles (2008-03-04) A Debunker on the Road to World War II, New York Times
  3. ^ Baker, Nicholson;"The Charms of Wikipedia", The New York Review of Books; Volume 55, Number 4 March 20, 2008.
  4. ^ How I fell in love with Wikipedia
  5. ^ Toibin, Colm (March 23, 2008). "Their Vilest Hour". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  6. ^ 'Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization' by Nicholson Baker - BOOK REVIEW - Los Angeles Times
  7. ^ Review, Daily Telegraph, 2 May2008
  8. ^ Review, New York Times, 12 March 2008
  9. ^ Review, New Statesman, 15 May 2008
  10. ^ Tyrell, R. Emmett, Jr., "J. Gordon Coogler Award for 2008," American Spectator; Volume 42, Number 2, March 2009
  11. ^ Toibin, Colm (March 23, 2008). "Their Vilest Hour". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  12. ^ Review, "Days of infamy 'Smoke' and mirrors," Los Angeles Times March 9, 2008.
  13. ^ Elaine Blair (September 29, 2011 • Volume 58, Number 14). "Coming Attractions". Review on "House of Holes". The New York Review of Books. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 

External links[edit]