Newark, California

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City of Newark
City
Silliman Activity and Family Aquatic Center

Seal
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°32′N 122°2′W / 37.533°N 122.033°W / 37.533; -122.033Coordinates: 37°32′N 122°2′W / 37.533°N 122.033°W / 37.533; -122.033
Country United States
State California
CountyAlameda
IncorporatedSeptember 22, 1955[1]
Government
 • MayorAlan L. Nagy[2]
 • State SenateEllen Corbett (D)[3]
 • State AssemblyBob Wieckowski (D)[4]
 • U. S. CongressMike Honda (D)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total13.898 sq mi (35.996 km2)
 • Land13.875 sq mi (35.936 km2)
 • Water0.023 sq mi (0.061 km2)  0.17%
Elevation[7]20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total42,573
 • Density3,068.3/sq mi (1,184.7/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code94560
Area code(s)510
FIPS code06-50916
GNIS feature IDs277562, 2411238
Websitewww.ci.newark.ca.us
 
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City of Newark
City
Silliman Activity and Family Aquatic Center

Seal
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°32′N 122°2′W / 37.533°N 122.033°W / 37.533; -122.033Coordinates: 37°32′N 122°2′W / 37.533°N 122.033°W / 37.533; -122.033
Country United States
State California
CountyAlameda
IncorporatedSeptember 22, 1955[1]
Government
 • MayorAlan L. Nagy[2]
 • State SenateEllen Corbett (D)[3]
 • State AssemblyBob Wieckowski (D)[4]
 • U. S. CongressMike Honda (D)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total13.898 sq mi (35.996 km2)
 • Land13.875 sq mi (35.936 km2)
 • Water0.023 sq mi (0.061 km2)  0.17%
Elevation[7]20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total42,573
 • Density3,068.3/sq mi (1,184.7/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code94560
Area code(s)510
FIPS code06-50916
GNIS feature IDs277562, 2411238
Websitewww.ci.newark.ca.us

Newark is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It was incorporated as a city in September 1955. Newark is an enclave, surrounded by the city of Fremont. The three cities of Newark, Fremont, and Union City make up the "Tri-City" area. Its population was 42,573 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

The southern end of the San Francisco Bay lies near the western edge of the city. State Route 84 runs through the city, and continues as the Dumbarton Bridge to cross the San Francisco Bay to reach Menlo Park. Interstate 880 serves as the eastern boundary with Fremont.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.9 square miles (36 km2), of which, 13.9 square miles (36 km2) of it is land and 0.02 square miles (0.052 km2) of it (0.17%) is water.

History[edit]

Newark was named after Newark Castle, Port Glasgow in Scotland by J. Barr Robertson.

Before it was settled by Europeans, Newark was home to the Ohlone Indians. The first European settlement in the area was by the Spanish missionaries of Mission San José, whose territory covered much of the present day cities of Newark, Fremont, and Union City. In 1878 land belonging to Washington Township of Alameda County was purchased by The Pacific Land Investment Company and subdivided to form the town of Newark. The population of this newly developing suburban area did not exceed more that one hundred residents.[8] Newark was incorporated in 1955.[8]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[9] reported that Newark had a population of 42,574. The population density was 3,063.2 people per square mile (1,182.7/km²). The racial makeup of Newark was 17,567 (41.3%) White, 2,002 (4.7%) African American, 279 (0.7%) Native American, 11,571 (27.2%) Asian, 621 (1.5%) Pacific Islander, 7,735 (18.2%) from other races, and 2,799 (6.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14,994 persons (35.2%).

The Census reported that 42,428 people (99.7% of the population) lived in households, 145 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 12,972 households, out of which 5,643 (43.5%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 7,832 (60.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,716 (13.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 786 (6.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 659 (5.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 93 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,942 households (15.0%) were made up of individuals and 705 (5.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.27. There were 10,334 families (79.7% of all households); the average family size was 3.60.

The population was spread out with 10,799 people (25.4%) under the age of 18, 3,824 people (9.0%) aged 18 to 24, 12,697 people (29.8%) aged 25 to 44, 10,727 people (25.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 4,526 people (10.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.4 years. For every 100 females there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.

There were 13,414 housing units at an average density of 965.2 per square mile (372.7/km²), of which 8,942 (68.9%) were owner-occupied, and 4,030 (31.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.0%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.0%. 28,489 people (66.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 13,939 people (32.7%) lived in rental housing units.

Demographic profile[10]2010
Total Population42,573 - 100.0%
One Race39,774 - 93.4%
Not Hispanic or Latino27,579 - 64.8%
White alone11,726 - 27.5%
Black or African American alone1,908 - 4.5%
American Indian and Alaska Native alone95 - 0.2%
Asian alone11,404 - 26.8%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone601 - 1.4%
Some other race alone101 - 0.2%
Two or more races alone1,744 - 4.1%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race)14,994 - 35.2%

2000[edit]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 42,471 people, 12,992 households, and 10,341 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,039.4 people per square mile (1,173.8/km²). There were 13,150 housing units at an average density of 941.1 per square mile (363.4/km²).

There were 12,992 households out of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.4% were non-families. 14.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.26 and the average family size was 3.59.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 7.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 101.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $69,350, and the median income for a family was $71,351 (these figures had risen to $78,367 and $81,652 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[12]). Males had a median income of $46,061 versus $34,959 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,641. About 4.2% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature, Newark is in the 10th Senate District, represented by Democrat Ellen Corbett,[3] and in the 25th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Bob Wieckowski.[4] Federally, Newark is in California's 17th congressional district, represented by Democrat Mike Honda.[5]

Economy[edit]

Newark's economy is at the edge of Silicon Valley and shares its economic pattern.

Cargill Salt, previously known as Leslie Salt, operates a large salt refinery in Newark which cleans solar salt produced in salt evaporation ponds in the San Francisco Bay.[13]

Wedgewood manufactured stoves in town from the 1910s until the 1940s.[8] Peterbilt manufactured trucks in Newark from the early 1960s up to the mid-1980s.[14] Adjacent to the Peterbilt truck facility, in 1956 Trailmobile moved its manufacturing and assembly plant from Berkeley California to a new 208,000 sq. ft. facility in Newark California. Once located at 6000 Stevenson Blvd., the Trailmobile plant closed in 1975 and moved to a new facility in Charleston Illinois. [15] From the mid 1950's through the early 1960's A.O. Smith Corporation of Kankakee Illinois built residential and commercial grade glass-lined water heaters at a large manufacturing facility located on Sycamore Avenue. The plant was later acquired by the National Steel Corporation which continued water heater manufacturing at the plant until the early 1970’s.

The city houses the Newpark Mall, a super-regional shopping center, with anchor stores Sears, JC Penny, Macy's, and Burlington Coat Factory, and over 140 other retailers.

The former Sun Microsystems site near I-880, State Route 84 and the Dumbarton Bridge was purchased by BioMed Realty Trust and is now known as the Pacific Research Center.

Top employers[edit]

According to the City's June 2012 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[16] the top employers in the city are:

#Employer# of Employees
1Newark Unified School District700
2Logitech621
3/4WorldPac280
3/4FullBloom Baking Company280
5Risk Management Solutions270
6SMART Modular Technologies249
7Morpho Detection208
8Cargill Salt182
9City of Newark183
10Valassis166

Culture and recreation[edit]

The City of Newark has thirteen parks and sport play facilities,[17] the George M. Silliman Community Activity and Family Aquatic Center (aka the Silliman Center). The Family Aquatic Center portion of the Silliman Center opened in the Summer of 2004 and includes a 32,300-square-foot (3,000 m2) indoor swim facility specifically designed for recreation, fitness, and instruction programs for the entire family. The 11,350-square-foot (1,054 m2) Natatorium includes four separate pools including: a 45' x 75' Activity Pool; a 245' long Lazy River pool (with a pair of 20' tall, curving water slides); a 4-foot (1.2 m) deep, 4-lane, 25-yard (23 m) Lap Pool; and a 15-person warm-water spa.[18]

Every September, the city has a weekend dedicated to Newark Days.[19]

Transportation[edit]

Newark lies near the intersection of I-880, State Route 84, and the Dumbarton Bridge.[20]

Newark is served by AC Transit bus system. Surrounding Fremont is the access point for most transportation services, including Fremont and Union City BART stations, and ACE and AMTRAK trains.

Future rail[edit]

Caltrain is planning a Dumbarton rail that would run between the Peninsula and Alameda County. This project would add four stations to the Caltrain system: Union City, Fremont-Centerville, Newark, and Menlo Park/East Palo Alto.[21] Dumbarton Rail is currently undergoing environmental and engineering review.

Education[edit]

Newark is home to a new campus of Ohlone College, a member of the California Community Colleges system. Other nearby educational centers include the University of Phoenix, ITT Institute, DeVry University, and Unitek College.

Newark has one high school, Newark Memorial High School, and junior high school, Newark Junior High School. Elementary schools include Kennedy, Bunker, Graham, Lincoln, Milani, Musick, Schilling, and Snow Schools and one catholic elementary St. Edward.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved March 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Mayor Alan L. Nagy". City of Newark. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "California's 17th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ U.S. Census
  7. ^ "Newark". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  8. ^ a b c "The History of Newark California". City of Newark official web site. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  9. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  10. ^ http://www.bayareacensus.ca.gov "Demographic Profile Bay Area Census". 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ACSSAFFFacts?_event=Search&geo_id=&_geoContext=&_street=&_county=newark&_cityTown=newark&_state=04000US06&_zip=&_lang=en&_sse=on&pctxt=fph&pgsl=010
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ "History". Peterbilt web site. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  15. ^ "History". Coachbuilt.com web site. Retrieved November 4, 2013. 
  16. ^ City of Newark CAFR
  17. ^ "Recreation & Community Services: Parks". City of Newark web site. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Silliman Center Official pdf". Retrieved 2008-04-17. 
  19. ^ "Historic Newark Days". Newark Days Inc. web site. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  20. ^ "google map". Retrieved 2008-04-17. 
  21. ^ "Dumbarton Rail Corridor". San Mateo County Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2007-01-24. 
  22. ^ "Terry Alderete". Hispanic Community Affairs Council. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  23. ^ http://images.checkoutmycards.com/zoom-back/f8be63fc-025f-4179-a8ad-8a9dcb1be5bf.jpg
  24. ^ Argus, Saturday, January 23, 1965, Page 4
  25. ^ http://images.checkoutmycards.com/zoom-back/eea7286b-28d8-4714-adfe-0d3b287a412d.jpg
  26. ^ http://www.tv.com/people/christopher-titus/
  27. ^ The Genius: How Bill Walsh Reinvented Football and Created an NFL Dynasty by David Harris

External links[edit]