New Jersey Attorney General

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State of New Jersey Office of the Attorney General
Seal of the Attorney General of New Jersey.svg
Agency overview
JurisdictionNew Jersey
HeadquartersRichard J. Hughes Justice Complex, 25 Market Street, Trenton, New Jersey
Agency executiveJohn Jay Hoffman, Acting Attorney General
Parent AgencyState of New Jersey
Website
http://www.nj.gov/lps
 
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State of New Jersey Office of the Attorney General
Seal of the Attorney General of New Jersey.svg
Agency overview
JurisdictionNew Jersey
HeadquartersRichard J. Hughes Justice Complex, 25 Market Street, Trenton, New Jersey
Agency executiveJohn Jay Hoffman, Acting Attorney General
Parent AgencyState of New Jersey
Website
http://www.nj.gov/lps

The Attorney General of New Jersey is a member of the executive cabinet of the state and oversees the Department of Law and Public Safety. The office is appointed by the Governor of New Jersey, confirmed by the New Jersey Senate, and term limited. Under the provisions of the New Jersey State Constitution, the Attorney General serves a concurrent four-year term to the governor.

The conventional wisdom is that the Attorney General cannot be removed from office except "for cause" by the Governor or by way of legislative impeachment,.[1]

It is fifth in the line of succession after the Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey, President of the New Jersey Senate, and Speaker of the New Jersey General Assembly. The Attorney General cannot also serve as the Lieutenant Governor.

Contents

List of office holders[edit]

Holders of the office of Attorney General include:[2]

Colonial period[edit]

Post-independence[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Letter from OLS Deputy Counsel Danielle A. Brucchieri to Senate Republican Office, Office of Legislative Services, May 9, 2005. Accessed December 2, 2008.
  2. ^ Past Attorneys General, New Jersey Attorney General. Accessed December 15, 2007.
  3. ^ William Paterson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 1, 2006.
  4. ^ Political Graveyard: Aaron Dickinson Woodruff, accessed August 27, 2006.
  5. ^ Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress: Theodore Frelinghuysen, accessed December 1, 2006.
  6. ^ Samuel Lewis Southard, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 1, 2006.
  7. ^ Richard Stockton Field, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 25, 2007.
  8. ^ Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 20, 2007.
  9. ^ William L. Dayton, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed November 11, 2006.
  10. ^ Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 1, 2006.
  11. ^ George Maxwell Robeson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 1, 2006.
  12. ^ New Jersey State Library biography for Joel Parker, New Jersey State Library. Acecssed July 11, 2007.
  13. ^ John Potter Stockton, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 1, 2006.
  14. ^ New Jersey: State Attorneys General, The Political Graveyard. Accessed April 24, 2007.
  15. ^ "Hello to a new day", The Star-Ledger, June 22, 2007. Accessed July 11, 2007.
  16. ^ "Senate confirms 5 NJ Cabinet picks". Asbury Park Press. 2010-02-22. Retrieved 2010-02-22. [dead link]
  17. ^ "Paula Dow is sworn in as N.J. Attorney General". The Star-Ledger. 2010-02-23. Retrieved 2010-02-23. 
  18. ^ Official Biography. Accessed January 24, 2012.
  19. ^ http://www.senate.gov/states/NJ/senators.htm
  20. ^ http://blog.northjersey.com/thepoliticalstate/7543/john-hoffman-named-acting-attorney-general/

External links[edit]