Nakhodka

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Nakhodka (English)
Находка (Russian)
-  City[1]  -
Central Square in Nakhodka.JPG
Central Square in Nakhodka
Nakhodka is located in Primorsky Krai
Nakhodka
Location of Nakhodka in Primorsky Krai
Coordinates: 42°49′N 132°53′E / 42.817°N 132.883°E / 42.817; 132.883Coordinates: 42°49′N 132°53′E / 42.817°N 132.883°E / 42.817; 132.883
Coat of Arms of Nakhodka (Primorsky kray).png
Flag of Nakhodka (Primorsky krai).png
Coat of arms
Flag
City DayLast Sunday in May[citation needed]
Administrative status (as of November 2011)
CountryRussia
Federal subjectPrimorsky Krai[1]
Administratively subordinated toNakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction[1]
Administrative center ofNakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction[1]
Municipal status (as of December 2004)
Urban okrugNakhodkinsky Urban Okrug[2]
Administrative center ofNakhodkinsky Urban Okrug[2]
Mayor[citation needed]Oleg Kolyadin[citation needed]
Statistics
Population (2010 Census)159,695 inhabitants[3]
Rank in 2010110th
Population (2002 Census)148,826 inhabitants[4]
Rank in 2002114th
Time zoneVLAT (UTC+11:00)[5]
City status sinceMay 18, 1950[citation needed]
Postal code(s)692900–692955[citation needed]
Dialing code(s)+7 4236[citation needed]
Official website
Nakhodka on WikiCommons
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Nakhodka (English)
Находка (Russian)
-  City[1]  -
Central Square in Nakhodka.JPG
Central Square in Nakhodka
Nakhodka is located in Primorsky Krai
Nakhodka
Location of Nakhodka in Primorsky Krai
Coordinates: 42°49′N 132°53′E / 42.817°N 132.883°E / 42.817; 132.883Coordinates: 42°49′N 132°53′E / 42.817°N 132.883°E / 42.817; 132.883
Coat of Arms of Nakhodka (Primorsky kray).png
Flag of Nakhodka (Primorsky krai).png
Coat of arms
Flag
City DayLast Sunday in May[citation needed]
Administrative status (as of November 2011)
CountryRussia
Federal subjectPrimorsky Krai[1]
Administratively subordinated toNakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction[1]
Administrative center ofNakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction[1]
Municipal status (as of December 2004)
Urban okrugNakhodkinsky Urban Okrug[2]
Administrative center ofNakhodkinsky Urban Okrug[2]
Mayor[citation needed]Oleg Kolyadin[citation needed]
Statistics
Population (2010 Census)159,695 inhabitants[3]
Rank in 2010110th
Population (2002 Census)148,826 inhabitants[4]
Rank in 2002114th
Time zoneVLAT (UTC+11:00)[5]
City status sinceMay 18, 1950[citation needed]
Postal code(s)692900–692955[citation needed]
Dialing code(s)+7 4236[citation needed]
Official website
Nakhodka on WikiCommons

Nakhodka (Russian: Нахо́дка; IPA: [nɐˈxotkə]) is a port city in Primorsky Krai, Russia, situated on the Trudny Peninsula jutting into the Nakhodka Bay of the Sea of Japan, about 85 kilometers (53 mi) east of Vladivostok. Population: 159,695 (2010 Census preliminary results);[3] 148,826 (2002 Census);[4] 160,056 (1989 Census).[6]

In 1950–1991, when the nearby large port of Vladivostok was closed to foreigners and foreign shipping, Nakhodka became the primary deep water port in the Russian Far East.

Contents

History

Nakhodka Bay, around which the city is organized, was discovered in 1859 by the Russian corvette Amerika, which sought shelter in the bay during a storm. In honor of this occasion, the ice-free and relatively calm bay was named Nakhodka, which in Russian means "discovery" or "lucky find".

Until the 20th century the area around the bay remained uninhabited, with the first settlement a small fishing village founded in 1907.[citation needed] When the Soviet government decided to build a harbor in the area in the 1930s, a number of small settlements were founded, which were merged as a work settlement in the 1940s. On May 18, 1950, the settlement, by then with a population of about 28,000 residents, was granted town status.[citation needed]

In the early 1950s, Soviet authorities decided to close Vladivostok to foreign shipping and use it as the base for the Soviet Pacific Fleet. Nakhodka became both the eastern terminus for passenger trains on the Trans-Siberian Railway and only port in the Russian Far East which was open to foreigners, these factors stimulating the town's rapid growth. The city's heyday was apparently in the 1970s and 1980s, when it was very well-cared for due to its visibility to foreigners.

Administrative and municipal status

Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is, together with three rural localities, incorporated as Nakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts.[1] As a municipal division, Nakhodka City Under Krai Jurisdiction is incorporated as Nakhodkinsky Urban Okrug.[2]

Climate

Nakhodka has one of the mildest climates in Primorsky Krai and in whole Asian part of Russia thanks to its southerly location and oceanic influences from the Sea of Japan. Average temperature in January is −9.3 °C (15.3 °F), in August (the warmest month) +20.6 °C (69.1 °F).

Economy and infrastructure

The city's economy, based mostly around the port and port-related activity such as fish processing and canning, has suffered since 1991 as Vladivostok was opened to foreign activity again. Local industry also took a hit during the 1998 Russian financial crisis. However, Nakhodka has been declared a free economic zone, and the governments in both Moscow (federal) and Vladivostok (regional) have seemed interested in opening the city further to foreign investment.

Nakhodka is also an important transport junction where goods from Japan are transferred from ships onto the Russian railway system, including the Trans-Siberian Railway portion of the Eurasian Land Bridge.

As of 2010, there are 1,932 enterprises listed. There are 646 retail stores, 210 public catering entities, 9 markets. Annual turnover tops 13, 1 bln rubles (over 400, 400 USD). There operate many malls, supermarkets, federal chain store outlets in the city, the examples being Svyaznoy, Yevroset, Eldorado, and many others.

City's enterprises make their entry in the '100 best goods of Russia' nationwide contest, among numerous others, on a regular basis to a moderate success.

There was also opened a consulting center for young entrepreneurs, a collaboration of sister-cities' municipalities of Nakhodka and Bellingham, United States.

Sports

FC Okean Nakhodka is the only professional sport club in the city. It spent the 1992 and 1993 seasons in the Russian Premier League. It is also the home town of association football player Viktor Fayzulin.

International relations

Twin towns and sister cities

Nakhodka has the following sister city relationships:

CityStateCountryYear
MaizuruFlag of Kyoto Prefecture.svg Kyoto JapanJune, 19611
OtaruFlag of Hokkaido Prefecture.svg Hokkaido JapanSeptember 12, 1966
Bellingham Washington United StatesApril, 1975
Oakland California United StatesApril, 1975
TsurugaFlag of Fukui Prefecture.svg Fukui JapanOctober, 1982
JilinChina Jilin ChinaJuly, 1991
DonghaeSouth Korea Gangwon South KoreaDecember, 1991
Clare Michigan United StatesOctober, 1997
PhuketSeal Phuket.png Phuket Province ThailandSeptember 21, 2006

^1 First Soviet Union-Japan sister city

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Law #161-KZ
  2. ^ a b c Law #183-KZ
  3. ^ a b "Предварительные итоги Всероссийской переписи населения 2010 года [Preliminary results of the 2010 All-Russian Population Census]" (in Russian). Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census). Federal State Statistics Service. 2011. http://www.perepis-2010.ru/results_of_the_census/results-inform.php. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек [Population of Russia, its federal districts, federal subjects, districts, urban localities, rural localities—administrative centers, and rural localities with population of over 3,000]" (in Russian). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002). Federal State Statistics Service. May 21, 2004. http://www.perepis2002.ru/ct/doc/1_TOM_01_04.xls. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  5. ^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Постановление №725 от 31 августа 2011 г. «О составе территорий, образующих каждую часовую зону, и порядке исчисления времени в часовых зонах, а также о признании утратившими силу отдельных Постановлений Правительства Российской Федерации». Вступил в силу по истечении 7 дней после дня официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Российская Газета", №197, 6 сентября 2011 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Resolution #725 of August 31, 2011 On the Composition of the Territories Included into Each Time Zone and on the Procedures of Timekeeping in the Time Zones, as Well as on Abrogation of Several Resolutions of the Government of the Russian Federation. Effective as of after 7 days following the day of the official publication.).
  6. ^ Demoscope Weekly (1989). "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров. [All Union Population Census of 1989. Present population of union and autonomous republics, autonomous oblasts and okrugs, krais, oblasts, districts, urban settlements, and villages serving as district administrative centers]" (in Russian). Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года (All-Union Population Census of 1989). Institute of Demographics of the State University—Higher School of Economics. http://demoscope.ru/weekly/ssp/rus89_reg.php. Retrieved February 9, 2012.

Sources