Nail disease

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Nail disease or disorder
Classification and external resources
ONYCHIA1.JPG
Onychia without granuloma
ICD-10L60, Q84.3-Q84.6
ICD-9703, 757.5
DiseasesDB23092
MedlinePlus003247
eMedicineorthoped/421
MeSHD009260
 
  (Redirected from Nail dystrophy)
Jump to: navigation, search
"Onychia" redirects here. For the squid genus, see Onykia.
Nail disease or disorder
Classification and external resources
ONYCHIA1.JPG
Onychia without granuloma
ICD-10L60, Q84.3-Q84.6
ICD-9703, 757.5
DiseasesDB23092
MedlinePlus003247
eMedicineorthoped/421
MeSHD009260

Nail diseases are distinct from diseases of the skin. Although nails are a skin appendage, they have their own signs and symptoms which may relate to other medical conditions. Nail conditions that show signs of infection or inflammation require medical assistance. Deformity or disease of the nails may be referred to as onychosis.

Diseases[edit]

Anatomy of the basic parts of a human nail. A. Nail plate; B. lunula; C. root; D. sinus; E. matrix; F. nail bed; G. eponychium; H. free margin.
Onychomycosis in every nail of the right foot.
Subungual hematoma (mild)

Nail changes and conditions associated with them[edit]

Nail inspection can give hints to the internal condition of the body as well. Nail disease can be very subtle and should be evaluated by a dermatologist with a focus in this particular area of medicine.[2] A nail technician may be the first to note a subtle change in nail health.[3][4][5]

Pliability[edit]

Shape and texture[edit]

Discoloration of entire nail bed[edit]

Other color changes and markings[edit]

Treatment[edit]

In approximately half of suspected nail fungus cases there is actually no fungal infection, but only some nail dystrophy.[7] Before beginning oral antifungal therapy the health care provider should confirm a fungal infection.[7] Administration of treatment to persons without an infection is unnecessary health care and causes needless exposure to side effects.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hall, John C. (2006). "25. Dermatologic mycology.". In John C. Hall. Sauer's Manual of Skin Diseases (9th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 244=266. ISBN 0-7817-2947-5. 
  2. ^ http://www.nailsmag.com/feature.aspx?fid=762&ft=1
  3. ^ Common nail tumors. Baran R, Richert B. Dermatol Clin. 2006 Jul;24(3):297-311. Review.
  4. ^ Dealing with melanonychia. Tosti A, Piraccini BM, de Farias DC. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2009 Mar;28(1):49-54. Review.
  5. ^ The nail in systemic diseases. Tosti A, Iorizzo M, Piraccini BM, Starace M. Dermatol Clin. 2006 Jul;24(3):341-7. Review.
  6. ^ Baylor All Saints Medical Centers: Thyroid Disease
  7. ^ a b c American Academy of Dermatology (February 2013), Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question, Choosing Wisely: an initiative of the ABIM Foundation (American Academy of Dermatology), retrieved 5 December 2013 , which cites
    • Roberts, D. T.; Taylor, W. D.; Boyle, J.; British Association of Dermatologists (2003). "Guidelines for treatment of onychomycosis". The British journal of dermatology 148 (3): 402–410. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2133.2003.05242.x. PMID 12653730. 
    • Mehregan, D. R.; Gee, S. L. (1999). "The cost effectiveness of testing for onychomycosis versus empiric treatment of onychodystrophies with oral antifungal agents". Cutis 64 (6): 407–410. PMID 10626104. 

External links[edit]