NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship

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NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
2014 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament
NCAA logo.svg
SportWomen's Basketball
Founded1982
No. of teams64
CountryNCAA Division I (USA)
Most recent champion(s)Connecticut (9)
Most titlesConnecticut (9)
TV partner(s)ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, WatchESPN
Official websiteNCAA.com
 
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NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
2014 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament
NCAA logo.svg
SportWomen's Basketball
Founded1982
No. of teams64
CountryNCAA Division I (USA)
Most recent champion(s)Connecticut (9)
Most titlesConnecticut (9)
TV partner(s)ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, WatchESPN
Official websiteNCAA.com

The NCAA Women's Division I Championship is an annual college basketball tournament for women. Held each April, the Women's Championship was inaugurated in the 1981–82 season. The NCAA tournament was preceded by the AIAW Women's Basketball Tournament, which was held annually from 1972 to 1982. Basketball was one of 12 women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981-82 school year, as the NCAA engaged in battle with the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women for sole governance of women's collegiate sports. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championship program in the same 12 (and other) sports; however, after a year of dual women's championships, the NCAA prevailed, while the AIAW disbanded.

Attendance and interest in the Women's Division I Championship have grown over the years, especially since 2003, when the final championship game was moved to the Tuesday following the Monday men's championship game.[1] The women's championship game is now the final overall game of the college basketball season. Before that, the Women's Final Four was usually played on the Friday before the Men's Final Four or the hours before the men played on the final Saturday of the tournament. The final was usually played the Sunday afternoon following the Men's Final Four.

The tournament bracket is made up of champions from each Division I conference, which receive automatic bids. The remaining slots are at-large bids, with teams chosen by an NCAA selection committee. The selection process and tournament seedings are based on several factors, including team rankings, win-loss records and Ratings Percentage Index (RPI) data.

Unlike the men's tournament, there are only 32 at-large bids (since 2014), and no play-in game. The women's tournament, like the men's, is staged in a single elimination format, and is part of the media and public frenzy known colloquially as March Madness or The Big Dance.

All 63 games have been broadcast on television since 2003 on ESPN and ESPN2.[2] Similar to the pre-2011 men's tournament coverage on CBS, local teams are shown on each channel when available, with "whip-around" coverage designed to showcase the most competitive contests in the rest of the country.

Tournament format[edit]

A total of 64 teams qualify for the tournament played in March and April. Of these teams, 32 earn automatic bids by winning their respective conference tournaments. Since the Ivy League does not conduct a post-season tournament, the regular-season conference champion receives an automatic bid. The remaining teams are granted "at-large" bids, which are extended by the NCAA Selection Committee. Dr. Marilyn McNeil, vice president/director of athletics at Monmouth University is the current chairwoman. On March 1, 2011, Bowling Green State University's director of intercollegiate athletics, Greg Christopher, was appointed chair of the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Committee during the 2011–12 academic year.[3]

The tournament is split into four regional tournaments, and each regional has teams seeded from 1 to 16, with the committee ostensibly making every region as comparable to the others as possible[citation needed]. The top-seeded team in each region plays the #16 team, the #2 team plays the #15, etc.

Number of teams, and seeding[edit]

The first NCAA women's basketball tournament was held in 1982. The AIAW also held a basketball tournament in 1982, but most of the top teams, including defending AIAW champion Louisiana Tech, decided to participate in the NCAA tournament.

The championship consisted of 32 teams from 1982–1985 (in 1983, 36), 40 teams from 1986–1988, and 48 teams from 1989–1993. Since 1994 64 teams compete in each tournament.

Prior to 1996, seeding was conducted on a regional basis. The top teams (eight in the 32-, 40-, and 48-team formats, and 16 in the 64-team format) were ranked and seeded on a national basis. The remaining teams were then seeded based on their geographic region. Teams were moved outside of its geographic region only if it was necessary to balance the bracket, or if the proximity of an opponent outside of its region would be comparable and a more competitive game would result. In 1993, all teams except for the top four were explicitly unseeded. The regional seeding resumed in 1994. In 1996, seeds were assigned on a national basis using an "S-Curve" format[clarification needed] similar to the process used in selecting the field for the men's tournament.

The following table summarizes some of the key attributes of the seeding process:[4]

 Number of teams selected  
YearAutomaticAt-LargeTotalLocation of first round(s)Seeding Basis
1982122032Higher seedRegional
1983142236Higher seed†
1984171532Higher seed†
19851814Higher seed
1986172340Higher seed†
19871822Higher seed†
19881822Higher seed†
1989192948Higher seed†
19902127Higher seed†
19912127Higher seed†
19922226Higher seed†
19932325Higher seed†
1994323264Higher seed†
19953232Higher seed†
19963133Higher seedNational
19973034Higher seed†
19983034Higher seed
19993034Higher seed
20003034Higher seed†
20013133Higher seed†
20023133Higher seed
20033133Sixteen Sites‡
20043133Sixteen Sites‡
20053133Eight Sites‡
20063133Eight Sites‡
20073133Eight Sites‡
20083133Eight Sites‡
20093133Sixteen Sites‡
20103133Sixteen Sites‡
20113133Sixteen Sites‡
20123133Sixteen Sites‡
20133133Sixteen Sites‡
20143232Sixteen Sites‡

† Some exceptions. Due to venue availability, in some cases, the lower seed hosted, or the game was played at a neutral site
‡ Starting in 2003, sixteen predetermined sites were selected for first and second round games. Teams were allowed to play at home, if hosting.
Between 2005 and 2008, eight sites were used for first round games

Selection process[edit]

For more details on this topic, see NCAA basketball tournament selection process.

A special selection committee appointed by the NCAA determines which 64 teams will enter the tournament, and where they will be seeded and placed in the bracket. Because of the automatic birds, only 32 teams (the at-large bids) rely on the selection committee to secure them a spot in the tournament.

Women's NCAA Division I basketball champions[edit]

YearWinnerScoreOpponentVenueOther Semifinalists
1982Louisiana Tech76–62Cheyney StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, Virginia)Tennessee & Maryland
1983USC69–67Louisiana TechOld Dominion & Georgia
1984USC72–61TennesseePauley Pavilion (Los Angeles, California)Cheyney State & Louisiana Tech
1985Old Dominion70–65GeorgiaFrank Erwin Center (Austin, Texas)Western Kentucky & Northeast Louisiana
1986Texas97–81USCRupp Arena (Lexington, Kentucky)Western Kentucky & Tennessee
1987Tennessee67–44Louisiana TechFrank Erwin Center (Austin, Texas)Texas & Long Beach State
1988Louisiana Tech56–54AuburnTacoma Dome (Tacoma, Washington)Long Beach State & Tennessee
1989Tennessee76–70AuburnLouisiana Tech & Maryland
1990Stanford88–81AuburnThompson–Boling Arena (Knoxville, Tennessee)Virginia & Louisiana Tech
1991Tennessee70–67 (OT)VirginiaLakefront Arena (New Orleans, Louisiana)Connecticut & Stanford
1992Stanford78–62Western KentuckyLos Angeles Memorial Sports Arena (Los Angeles, California)Southwest Missouri State & Virginia
1993Texas Tech84–82Ohio StateOmni Coliseum (Atlanta, Georgia)Iowa & Vanderbilt
1994North Carolina60–59Louisiana TechRichmond Coliseum (Richmond, Virginia)Purdue & Alabama
1995Connecticut70–64TennesseeTarget Center (Minneapolis, Minnesota)Stanford & Georgia
1996Tennessee83–65GeorgiaCharlotte Coliseum (Charlotte, North Carolina)Connecticut & Stanford
1997Tennessee68–59Old DominionRiverfront Coliseum (Cincinnati, Ohio)Notre Dame & Stanford
1998Tennessee93–75Louisiana TechKemper Arena (Kansas City, Missouri)Arkansas & NC State
1999Purdue62–45DukeSan Jose Arena (San Jose, California)Louisiana Tech & Georgia
2000Connecticut71–52TennesseeFirst Union Center (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)Rutgers & Penn State
2001Notre Dame68–66PurdueSavvis Center (St. Louis, Missouri)Connecticut & SW Missouri St
2002Connecticut82–70OklahomaAlamodome (San Antonio, Texas)Tennessee & Duke
2003Connecticut73–68TennesseeGeorgia Dome (Atlanta, Georgia)Texas & Duke
2004Connecticut70–61TennesseeNew Orleans Arena (New Orleans, Louisiana)Minnesota & LSU
2005Baylor84–62Michigan StateRCA Dome (Indianapolis, Indiana)LSU & Tennessee
2006Maryland78–75 (OT)DukeTD Garden (Boston, Massachusetts)North Carolina & LSU
2007Tennessee59–46RutgersQuicken Loans Arena (Cleveland, Ohio)
2008Tennessee64–48StanfordSt. Pete Times Forum (Tampa, Florida)LSU & Connecticut
2009Connecticut76–54LouisvilleScottrade Center (St. Louis, Missouri)Stanford & Oklahoma
2010Connecticut53–47StanfordAlamodome (San Antonio, Texas)Baylor & Oklahoma
2011Texas A&M76–70Notre DameConseco Fieldhouse (Indianapolis, Indiana)Connecticut & Stanford
2012Baylor80–61Notre DamePepsi Center (Denver, Colorado)Stanford & Connecticut
2013Connecticut93–60LouisvilleNew Orleans Arena (New Orleans, Louisiana)Notre Dame & California
2014Connecticut79-58Notre DameBridgestone Arena (Nashville, Tennessee)Stanford & Maryland
2015Tampa Bay Times Forum (Tampa, Florida)
2016Lucas Oil Stadium (Indianapolis, Indiana)

NCAA Championship Game Appearance By School[edit]

National Championship game winners in bold

SchoolNCAA Final AppearancesChampionshipsRunner Up
Tennessee1984, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2007, 200885
Connecticut1995, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2010, 2013, 201490
Louisiana Tech1982, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1994, 199824
Stanford1990, 1992, 2008, 201022
Notre Dame2001, 2011, 2012, 201413
USC1983, 1984, 198621
Auburn1988, 1989, 199003
Baylor2005, 201220
Purdue1999, 200111
Old Dominion1985, 199711
Duke1999, 200602
Georgia1985, 199602
Louisville2009, 201302
Texas A&M201110
Maryland200610
North Carolina199410
Texas Tech199310
Texas198610
Rutgers200701
Michigan State200501
Oklahoma200201
Ohio State199301
Western Kentucky199201
Virginia199101
Cheyney State198201

NCAA Final Fours by school[edit]

SchoolFinal Four YearsNumber of AppearancesChampionships
Tennessee1982, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008188
Connecticut1991, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014159
Stanford1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014122
Louisiana Tech1982, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1994, 1998, 1999102
Notre Dame1997, 2001, 2011, 2012, 2013, 201461
Georgia1983, 1985, 1995, 1996, 199950
LSU2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 200850
Duke1999, 2002, 2003, 200640
Maryland1982, 1989, 2006, 201441
Auburn1988, 1989, 199030
Baylor2005, 2010, 201232
North Carolina1994, 2006, 200731
Oklahoma2002, 2009, 201030
Old Dominion1983, 1985, 199731
Purdue1994, 1999, 200131
Texas1986, 1987, 200331
USC1983, 1984, 198632
Virginia1990, 1991, 199230
Western Kentucky1985, 1986, 199230
Cheyney St.1982, 198420
Long Beach St.1987, 198820
Louisville2009, 201320
Missouri St.1992, 200120
Rutgers2000, 200720
Alabama199410
Arkansas199810
California201310
Iowa199310
Louisiana-Monroe198510
Michigan St.200510
Minnesota200410
NC State199810
Ohio St.199310
Penn St.200010
Texas A&M201111
Texas Tech199311
Vanderbilt199310

Multiple NCAA championship coaches[edit]

CoachSchoolChampionships
Geno AuriemmaConnecticut9
Pat SummittTennessee8
Kim MulkeyBaylor2
Linda SharpUSC2
Tara VanDerveerStanford2

NCAA Championship by Conference[edit]

Note: Conferences are listed by all champions' affiliations at that time; these do not necessarily match current affiliations.

ConferenceYearChampionships
The American[a 1]1995, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2010, 2013, 20149
SEC1987, 1989, 1991, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2007, 20088
Big 122005, 2011, 20123
ACC1994, 2001, 20063
Pac-121990, 19922
Southwest1986, 19932
Western Collegiate1983, 19842
American South19881
Big Ten19991
Independent19821
Sun Belt19851
  1. ^ From 1979 until 2013, the conference was known as the Big East Conference. Connecticut won nine of the championships, and Notre Dame won the other. Following the three-way 2013 split of that conference and subsequent settlement between the non-FBS schools and the remaining schools, the conference legally changed its name to the American Athletic Conference. Three schools left for the Atlantic Coast Conference in 2013, with a fourth doing the same in 2014; one school left for the Big Ten in 2014; and the non-FBS schools retained the Big East name.

NCAA Final Four locations[edit]

NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship is located in USA
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NCAA Final Four locations (hover over city to see arena)

Tournament trends[edit]

Top-ranked teams[edit]

Since the women's tournament began in 1982, 14 teams have entered the tournament ranked #1 in at least 1 poll and gone on to win the tournament:

Champions excluded the next year[edit]

Only once has the reigning champion (the previous year's winner) not made it to the tournament the next year.

#1 seeds[edit]

Since 1982, at least one #1 seed has made the Final Four every year.

Only twice have all #1 seeds made it to the Final Four:

The championship game has matched two #1 seeds 11 times:

Three teams have beaten three #1 seeds during the course of a tournament (the largest number of such teams that can be faced):

Prior to the expansion of the tournament to 64 teams, all #1 seeds advanced to the Sweet Sixteen with three exceptions. Notably, the first two times this occurred were at the hands of the same school:

High seeds[edit]

Low seeds[edit]

Lowest seeds to reach each round since the expansion to 64 teams:

Best Performances by #14 & #15 Seeds[edit]

Unlike in the men's tournament, no #14 seed has defeated a #3 and no #15 seed has defeated a #2 seed, but they have come close.

First-round games[edit]

Since the expansion to 64 teams in 1994, each seed-pairing has played a total of 84 first-round games.

  1. The #1 seed is 83–1 against the #16 seed (.988).
  2. The #2 seed is 84–0 against the #15 seed (1.000).
  3. The #3 seed is 84–0 against the #14 seed (1.000).
  4. The #4 seed is 78–6 against the #13 seed (.929).
  5. The #5 seed is 66-18 against the #12 seed (.786).
  6. The #6 seed is 59–25 against the #11 seed (.702).
  7. The #7 seed is 56-28 against the #10 seed (.667).
  8. The #8 seed is 41–43 against the #9 seed (.488).

Second-round games[edit]

Since the expansion to 64 teams in 1994, the following results have occurred for each pairing:

vs. #8vs. #9
#139–1 (.975)37–2 (.949)
#160–1 (.000)
vs. #7vs. #10
#243–10 (.811)25–2 (.926)
#15
vs. #6vs. #11
#337–20 (.649)14–9 (.609)
#14
vs. #5vs. #12
#435–22 (.614)15–2 (.882)
#133–3 (.500)

Teams entering the tournament undefeated[edit]

14 teams have entered the tournament undefeated. 8 of them went on to win the National Championship.[6]

Home state[edit]

Only one team has ever played the Final Four on its home court. Two other teams have played the Final Four in their home cities, and seven others have played the Final Four in their home states.

The only team to play on its home court was Texas in 1987, which lost its semifinal game at the Frank Erwin Special Events Center.

Old Dominion enjoyed nearly as large an advantage in 1983 when the Final Four was played at the Norfolk Scope in its home city of Norfolk, Virginia, but also lost its semifinal. The Scope has never been the Lady Monarchs' regular home court. ODU has always used on-campus arenas, first the ODU Fieldhouse and since 2002 the Ted Constant Convocation Center. The following year, USC won the national title at Pauley Pavilion, the home court of its Los Angeles arch-rival UCLA.

Of the other teams to play in their home states, Stanford (1992) won the national title; Notre Dame (2011) lost in the championship game; and Western Kentucky (1986), Penn State (2000), Missouri State (2001), LSU (2004), and Baylor (2010) lost in the semifinals.

Championship margins[edit]

Same-conference championship games[edit]

5 championship games have featured two teams from the same conference:

Result by school and by year[edit]

264 teams have appeared in the NCAA Tournament in one or more years, between 1982 (the initial year that the post-season tournament was under the auspices of the NCAA) and 2014. The results for each year are summarised in the table below.[9]

The code in each cell represents the furthest the team made it in the respective tournament:

Sort
Team828384858687888990919293949596979899000102030405060708091011121314
Akron1
AlabamaS122FSSSS2
Alabama St.1
Albany (NY)111
Alcorn St.111
Appalachian St.1111
Arizona2S22112
Arizona St.SS112S2E2E12
Arkansas11ES2F2222
Army11
Auburn1SSSERRRES2E222212
Austin Peay1111111
Ball St.2
Baylor12SCS22SFECSE
Belmont1
Boise St.11
Boston College221SS2S
Boston U.1
Bowling Green11211111S11
Brown1
Bucknell11
Butler1
BYU1111S1211S
Cal Poly1
Cal St. Fullerton12
Cal St. Northridge11
California112112S2F2
Campbell1
Canisius1
Central Mich.111
Charlotte11
Chattanooga111112111111
CheyneyRSF
Cincinnati1121
Clemson12SSE222212S221
Cleveland St.11
Colgate1
Colorado221ESE2S2ES11
Colorado St.22S21
Connecticut12F21ECFEESCFCCCSEEFCCFFCC
Coppin St.111
Cornell1
Creighton22112
DartmouthO111111
Dayton21121
Delaware112S
Delaware St.1
Denver1
DePaul2121121122S1111S21S
Detroit1
DrakeE1221111S1
Drexel1
Duke2222ERSSFFEERSS2EEEE2
East Carolina11
East Tenn. St.111
Eastern Ill.1
Eastern Ky.11
Eastern Mich.11
Eastern Wash.1
Evansville11
Fairfield1111
FGCU11
FIU121212
Fla. Atlantic1
Florida2121ES12121222
Florida A&M11
Florida St.112222S22E222
Fordham11
Fresno St.1111111
Furman11
Ga. Southern11
Gardner-Webb1
George Washington222S2E2212122SS
GeorgetownS2S2
Georgia1FERSSS22E2FRE1FE21SESSS21SS1E1
Georgia St.111
Georgia Tech1121212S1
Gonzaga12SES11
Grambling11111
Green Bay11111211212S21
Hampton11111111
Hartford112211
Harvard112111
Hawaii12111
Holy Cross112111111111
Houston21211
Howard11111
Idaho111
Idaho St.111
Illinois122SS221
Illinois St.11211
IndianaS111
Iowa2EES222F2S2222111121122
Iowa St.12ESS2122ES1121
Jackson St.1O11
James MadisonSSS2S11112
Kansas221121S2S21SS
Kansas St.ES111S2222212
Kent St.12111
KentuckyE11122E2EES
La.-Monroe1SF
La SalleO112
La.-Lafayette1
LamarE1
Lehigh111
Liberty11111111S111111
Lipscomb1
Long Beach St.SEEESFFE2S1
Long Island1
Louisiana TechCRFEERCFF11ERSESRFEE1SS1111
Louisville11221211112SRS2RE
Loyola Marymount1
Loyola (MD)11
LSUSE21S12SSE22EFFFFF222SS
Maine1111211
Manhattan1111
Marist11S2112211
Marquette112111222
Marshall1
MarylandFS12EF21E21122C2EE2ESF
Massachusetts11
McNeese St.11
MemphisS122111
Miami (FL)1S2111221
Miami (OH)1
Michigan211212
Michigan St.22212RS2S22122
Middle Tenn.11121112212111111
Milwaukee11
Minnesota22SFS112
Mississippi1SSEESSES1E21111E
Mississippi St.12222S
MissouriS11121S11
Missouri State2FS221121F111
Monmouth1
MontanaOS222112221111111111
Montana State1
Mount St. Mary’s11
Murray St.1
N.C. A&T11
Navy111
Nebraska22121112S1S2
New Mexico11S11211
New Mexico St.12
New Orleans2
Norfolk St.1
North Carolina1S1S22SCSSESSS21EFFE21S2E
North Carolina St.S1SS2SSSSS21F21S111S11
North Dakota1
North Texas1
Northeastern1
Northern Ariz.1
Northern Ill.22111
Northwestern122221
Northwestern St.1111
Notre Dame112FS2SC2SS212S1SRRFR
Oakland11
Ohio11
Ohio St.11ESESS2R2122S211S2S1
OklahomaS2SSR121SS2FFS2S1
Oklahoma St.21S11121S22S
Old DominionSFECS2221221SRSSS1E11111S
Oral Roberts111111
Oregon112211212112
Oregon St.S11212
Penn111
Penn St.SE1SS2222S2E2S2F1SSE12S2S
Pepperdine1111
Pittsburgh2SS
Portland1111
Portland St.1
Prairie View11111
Princeton1111
Providence11S21
Purdue2S2SFE12EC2R2ES2SE2E2222
Quinnipac1
Radford111
Rhode Island1
Rice21
Richmond111
Robert Morris111
RutgersEES211221SEF221ESRES121
Sacred Heart111
Samford11
San Diego111
San Diego St.SS12112S1
San Francisco1S1
Santa Clara211111
Seton HallS2
Siena1
SMU1211221
South Ala.1
South CarolinaS121S1E2S2S
South Carolina St.1
South Dakota1
South Dakota St.21111
South Fla.12
Southeast Mo. St.11
Southern CaliforniaECCSRSS2ESE12221
Southern Ill.2S12
Southern Miss11121S12
Southern U.1111
St. BonaventureS
St. Francis Pa.11111111111
St. John’s NY112222S12
St. Joseph’s1222211122212
St. Mary’s Cal.12
St. Peter’s1111111
Stanford1SECFCSEFFF1122S2EEE2RFRFFSF
Stephen F. Austin112SS2SS11S2112111
Stetson111
Syracuse121112
TCU222212111
Temple2112121122
TennesseeFERSFCFCECSESRCCCERSFRRFECC1SEEES
Tennessee St.11
Tennessee Tech1122211111
TexasEESCFEEE122222111SFS2211112
Texas A&MS112ES2CS2E
Texas St.11
Texas Tech1211SCSES22SESSE2S11
Texas-Arlington11
Toledo2212111
Troy1
Tulane1121121211
Tulsa21
UAB1S
UALR211
UC Davis1
UC Irvine1
UC Riverside111
UC Santa Barb.221211122S1111
UCF1111
UCLA1S1S2E112222
UMBC1
UNC Asheville1
UNC Greensboro1
UNI11
UNLV112S2211
UT Martin1111
Utah1111111211S22E121
UTEP21
UTSA11
Valparaiso11
Vanderbilt221SSEFSSES12EE2SS22SS21221
VCU1
Vermont111112
Villanova221122E211
Virginia112SESFRFESEES21S1122221
Virginia Tech122S22212
Wake Forest2
Washington122S2ES22S11E121
Washington St.1
Weber St.11
West Virginia2S12222212
Western Caro.11
Western Ill.1
Western Ky.FF2211SRS2S122111
Western Mich.11
Wichita State11
Winthrop1
Wisconsin1221111
Wright St.1
Wyoming1
Xavier121E1111E2
Youngstown St.121

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://espn.go.com/womens-college-basketball/story/_/id/9873545/ncaa-trying-move-women-final-four-dates
  2. ^ Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Record p 75
  3. ^ "Greg Christopher named chair of DI Women’s Basketball Committee". NCAA. Mar 1, 2011. 
  4. ^ "2013 NCAA Women's Final Four Records". NCAA. Retrieved 15 Apr 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Record p 58
  6. ^ Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Record p 67
  7. ^ Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Record p 6,7
  8. ^ a b Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Record p 9
  9. ^ Nixon, Rick. "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 

References[edit]