Myalgia

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Myalgia
Classification and external resources
ICD-10M79.1
ICD-9729.1
DiseasesDB22895
MedlinePlus003178
 
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Myalgia
Classification and external resources
ICD-10M79.1
ICD-9729.1
DiseasesDB22895
MedlinePlus003178

Myalgia, or muscle pain, is a symptom of many diseases and disorders. The most common causes are the overuse or over-stretching of a muscle or group of muscles. Myalgia without a traumatic history is often due to viral infections. Longer-term myalgias may be indicative of a metabolic myopathy, some nutritional deficiencies or chronic fatigue syndrome.

Causes[edit]

The most common causes of myalgia are overuse, injury or strain. However, myalgia can also be caused by diseases, disorders, medications, or as a response to a vaccination. It is also a sign of acute rejection after heart transplant surgery.

The most common causes are:

Muscle pain occurs with:

Overuse[edit]

Overuse of a muscle is using it too much, too soon and/or too often.[1] Examples are:

Injury[edit]

The most common causes of myalgia by injury are: sprains and strains.[1]

Autoimmune[edit]

Multiple sclerosis (neurologic pain interpreted as muscular), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Myositis, Lupus erythematosus, Familial Mediterranean fever, Polyarteritis nodosa, Devic's disease, Morphea, Sarcoidosis

Metabolic defect[edit]

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, Conn's syndrome, Adrenal insufficiency, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism

Other[edit]

Chronic fatigue syndrome aka Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Hypokalemia, Hypotonia (Low Muscle Tone), Exercise intolerance, Mastocytosis, Peripheral neuropathy, Eosinophilia myalgia syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Barcoo Fever, Herpes, Hemochromatosis aka Iron Overload Disorder, Delayed onset muscle soreness, AIDS, HIV, Tumor-induced osteomalacia, Postorgasmic illness syndrome, Hypovitaminosis D[2]

Withdrawal syndrome from certain drugs[edit]

Sudden cessation of high-dose corticosteroids, opioids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, caffeine or alcohol can induce myalgia in many respects.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b MedlinePlus
  2. ^ Glueck, Charles (August 30, 2013). North American Journal of Medical Sciences 5 (8): 494-495. doi:10.4103/1947-2714.117325 http://www.najms.org/article.asp?issn=1947-2714;year=2013;volume=5;issue=8;spage=494;epage=495;aulast=Glueck |url= missing title (help). 

External links[edit]