Muskingum University

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Muskingum University
Muskingum University.svg
MottoOmne trium perfectum (Latin)
Motto in EnglishEverything which comes in threes is perfect
Established1837
TypePrivate, Liberal Arts
Religious affiliationPresbyterian Church (USA)
Endowment$62.6 million[1]
PresidentDr. Anne C. Steele
Academic staff114
Undergraduates1,700
Postgraduates1,300
LocationNew Concord, OH, USA
39°59′53″N 81°44′17″W / 39.998°N 81.738°W / 39.998; -81.738Coordinates: 39°59′53″N 81°44′17″W / 39.998°N 81.738°W / 39.998; -81.738
CampusRural, 225 acres (910,000 m²)
ColorsBlack and Magenta            
AthleticsNCAA Division IIIOhio Athletic Conference
NicknameFighting Muskies
MuskingumNewLogo.jpg
Paul Hall, Muskingum College
Paul Hall.jpg
Muskingum's first structure, Paul Hall sits behind a grove of trees on a hilltop. In front of the building is a large rock that was inscribed when the school first began with the statement "In God We Trust/Muskingum College/1837"
Muskingum University is located in Ohio
Muskingum University
LocationLayton Dr., Muskingum College campus, New Concord, Ohio
Coordinates39°59′43″N 81°44′04″W / 39.99536°N 81.73452°W / 39.99536; -81.73452
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1873
Architectural styleLate Victorian
Governing bodyPrivate
NRHP Reference #73001514[2]
Added to NRHPApril 23, 1973
 
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Muskingum University
Muskingum University.svg
MottoOmne trium perfectum (Latin)
Motto in EnglishEverything which comes in threes is perfect
Established1837
TypePrivate, Liberal Arts
Religious affiliationPresbyterian Church (USA)
Endowment$62.6 million[1]
PresidentDr. Anne C. Steele
Academic staff114
Undergraduates1,700
Postgraduates1,300
LocationNew Concord, OH, USA
39°59′53″N 81°44′17″W / 39.998°N 81.738°W / 39.998; -81.738Coordinates: 39°59′53″N 81°44′17″W / 39.998°N 81.738°W / 39.998; -81.738
CampusRural, 225 acres (910,000 m²)
ColorsBlack and Magenta            
AthleticsNCAA Division IIIOhio Athletic Conference
NicknameFighting Muskies
MuskingumNewLogo.jpg
Paul Hall, Muskingum College
Paul Hall.jpg
Muskingum's first structure, Paul Hall sits behind a grove of trees on a hilltop. In front of the building is a large rock that was inscribed when the school first began with the statement "In God We Trust/Muskingum College/1837"
Muskingum University is located in Ohio
Muskingum University
LocationLayton Dr., Muskingum College campus, New Concord, Ohio
Coordinates39°59′43″N 81°44′04″W / 39.99536°N 81.73452°W / 39.99536; -81.73452
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1873
Architectural styleLate Victorian
Governing bodyPrivate
NRHP Reference #73001514[2]
Added to NRHPApril 23, 1973
Montgomery Hall, Muskingum's main administrative building
Muskingum's campus lake and surrounding hills

Muskingum University is a private university located in New Concord, Ohio, United States. It is located approximately sixty miles east of the state capital of Columbus.

The university was founded in 1837.

Muskingum University is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Collectively, the university's alumni are referred to as the "Long Magenta Line" and students (both past and present) are known simply as "Muskies". New Concord, Ohio is located in far eastern Muskingum County, which derives its name from the Muskingum River. Hence the often misspelled and mispronounced Delaware Indian word Muskingum (translation- "village on the river bank" and/or "glare of an elk's eye"- there's a dispute) was used in naming the school. In June 2009, the institution's name was changed from "Muskingum College" to "Muskingum University".

The university's colors are black and magenta and the school's mascot is the “Fighting Muskie” (the muskellunge, the largest member of the pike family).

The university's motto is "Omni, Trinum, Perfectum", Latin for "Everything which comes in threes is perfect", which is a reference to both the Christian Trinity and Muskingum's mission to develop their students' minds, bodies and souls.

Muskingum offers more than 40 academic majors. The newest programs launched are digital media design, criminal justice, and engineering. A Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) program has also been initiated.

Graduate programs are offered in education and management information systems, strategy and technology. Muskingum is nationally known[citation needed] for its innovative PLUS program, a service which assists students with learning disabilities cope, adjust, and ultimately succeed in a higher learning environment.

Muskingum's campus consists of 21 major buildings, a football stadium and a small lake, which all sit atop 225 acres (0.91 km2) of rolling hills overlooking New Concord. The beauty of the campus was recently captured in "A Song of the Seasons: Paintings by Jianmin Dou" by Donna Edsall and Yan Sun (2003).

History[edit]

In 1827, the National Road (now US 40) was laid through what is now New Concord, roughly following what had been the primitive roadway known as Zane's Trace. A year later, the village of New Concord, Ohio was established by Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. On July 9, 1836, the first recorded meeting of the "Friends of Education" in New Concord, led by New Concord residents Samuel Willson and Benjamin Waddle, was held. A year later, the Ohio General Assembly authorized the creation of a college in New Concord, OH after being petitioned by the "Friends of Education" committee. On April 24, 1837, Muskingum College opened. Muskingum became a coeducational institution in 1854. In 1958, the United Presbyterian Church of North America (UPCNA) and the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) merge by signing a historic agreement in Brown Chapel. In 2001, the school's women's softball team captured the NCAA Division III National Championship, the school's first national title.[3]

Academics[edit]

Muskingum has been continuously accredited by the North Central Association of College and Secondary Schools since 1919. "The school up on the hill," as it is sometimes called by locals, offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees at the undergraduate level, and at the graduate level Master of Information Strategy Systems and Technology, Master of Arts in Education, and Master of Arts in Teaching graduate degrees. The university offers 44 academic majors along with a large number of minors, 9 pre-professional programs (including pre-law and pre-medicine) and teaching licensure, all of which must be pursued within a strong liberal arts curriculum, known at Muskingum as the "Liberal Arts Essentials" (LAEs) (see below). Among Muskingum's strongest undergraduate academic programs are its science division, math program, education department, and English department. Muskingum is often proclaimed as a "best value" in education, by combining strong academics with low tuition, by U.S. News & World Report and similar publications. In their 2008 America's Best College's guide, U.S. News & World Report ranked Muskingum the "31st Best Master's Level University" in the Midwest academically.[1] and the "4th Best Value" among Midwest Master's Level Universities [2].

Campus[edit]

Most of Muskingum's academic buildings are clustered around a traditional quad near the southern part of the campus. The quad is bordered by Montgomery Hall and the College Library to the south, Caldwell Hall, Cambridge Hall and the Student/Faculty Center to the west, the Recreation Center and John Glenn Gym to the north and Boyd Science Center to the east. Brown Chapel sits on the southeastern corner of the quad.

Athletics[edit]

Muskingum competes athletically in the NCAA as a Division III school and as one of the first and longest affiliated members of the Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC). M.U.'s teams compete under the name the Fighting Muskies. Rather than using the traditional magenta, Muskies athletics wear black and red. The school's main athletic rival is fellow OAC competitor the Marietta College Pioneers (which ironically was originally called the Muskingum Academy when established in 1797). Muskingum fields teams in American football, women's volleyball, baseball, women's softball, wrestling and men's and women's indoor track, outdoor track, soccer, tennis, cross country and golf. Muskingum has won 79 Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC) Championships, since the school joined the conference in 1923:

During the period between 1925- 1970 Muskingum was known as a football powerhouse in the OAC, led by college football Hall of Famer Edgar Sherman, first as a player and then as head coach. The Muskies even represented the OAC in two Grantland Rice Bowls (1964 & 1966) and won 12 OAC football championships during that forty-five year period. Through the years the M.C. men's basketball team has also seen success, having won 3 regular season OAC championships and 7 OAC tournament championships. In more recent years, the Muskingum women's softball teams have achieved considerable success, winning every OAC regular season championship since 1998 and the NCAA Division III national championship in 2001. Muskingum's softball coach Donna Newberry holds the record for the most victories in NCAA Division III history.

Alumni[edit]

Alumnus John Glenn '62

Collectively, Muskingum's alumni are referred to as the "Long Magenta Line". Muskingum College's favorite son is former astronaut and U.S. senator John Glenn, who graduated with a bachelor of science in 1962, the same year he became the first American to orbit the Earth (Glenn also has an honorary degree from Muskingum from 1961, but the B.S. he earned in 1962 is an earned degree). In 1983, John Glenn launched his White House bid from the Muskingum College quad in the heart of the campus. Glenn also announced his retirement from the United States Senate in Brown Chapel on live national television in 1997. Upon his retirement, Glenn donated his archives to the Ohio State University, with special conditions that Muskingum students would benefit from the collection at any time. Muskingum received national media attention once again in 1998, when a 77 year old Glenn returned to space aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery, becoming the oldest person ever in space.

References[edit]

  1. ^ As of June 30, 2013. "Muskingum University Financial Statement's June 30th, 2013" (PDF). Muskingum University Financial Dept. Muskingum University. Retrieved April 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  3. ^ William L. Fisk, "The Early Years Of Muskingum College," Old Northwest 1979 5(1): 19-44

External links[edit]