Mulholland Dam

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Mulholland Dam
Lake Hollywood Reservoir by clinton steeds.jpg
A view of Hollywood Reservoir and the back side of the Mulholland Dam
Location3005 Lake Hollywood Dr., Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, California
Coordinates34°07′4.8″N 118°19′51.8″W / 34.118000°N 118.331056°W / 34.118000; -118.331056Coordinates: 34°07′4.8″N 118°19′51.8″W / 34.118000°N 118.331056°W / 34.118000; -118.331056
Opening date1925
Owner(s)Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
Reservoir
CreatesHollywood Reservoir
Designated:1989[1]
Reference No.421
 
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Mulholland Dam
Lake Hollywood Reservoir by clinton steeds.jpg
A view of Hollywood Reservoir and the back side of the Mulholland Dam
Location3005 Lake Hollywood Dr., Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, California
Coordinates34°07′4.8″N 118°19′51.8″W / 34.118000°N 118.331056°W / 34.118000; -118.331056Coordinates: 34°07′4.8″N 118°19′51.8″W / 34.118000°N 118.331056°W / 34.118000; -118.331056
Opening date1925
Owner(s)Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
Reservoir
CreatesHollywood Reservoir
Designated:1989[1]
Reference No.421

The Mulholland Dam is a Los Angeles Department of Water and Power dam located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California. Designed with a storage capacity of 7,672 acre feet (2.5 billion US gallons/9,500,000 m3) of water at a maximum depth of 183 feet (56 m), the dam impounds the Hollywood Reservoir.

History[edit]

Originally named Weid Canyon Dam, then Hollywood Dam and, finally, Mulholland Dam in honor of William Mulholland who at the time was the General Manager and Chief Engineer of the Bureau of Water Works and Supply, a predecessor department of what is now known as the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Mulholland was responsible for the design and construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct and much of the city's water system, including many of the early earthen dams and storage reservoirs.

The Mulholland dam was the first concrete, curved gravity dam designed and built by the Bureau of Water Works and Supply. The construction of the dam began in August 1923 and was completed during December of 1925.[2]

In March of 1928, the St. Francis Dam experienced a catastrophic failure, and the resulting flood devastated the Santa Clara Valley and caused up to six hundred deaths.[3] The St. Francis Dam, also designed and built by the Bureau of Water Works and Supply. was nearly identical in size and shape to the Mulholland Dam.

William Mulholland ordered the Hollywood reservoir lowered shortly after the collapse of the St. Francis Dam due, in part, to public fears of a repeat disaster. After several technical reviews the Mulholland Dam was reinforced with tons of earth against its face.[4] In 1932 the LADWP placed 300,000 cubic yards of earth against the down stream face of the dam.[2]

In popular culture[edit]

The Mulholland Dam was portrayed in the 1974 disaster film Earthquake, although in the film it was named the Hollywood Reservoir Dam. After a giant earthquake destroys much of Los Angeles, the dam threatens to collapse and does due to aftershocks, which causes floods in Hollywood down to the Mid-Wilshire district of the city.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

The Mulholland Dam appeared in the first sequence of the movies Seven Psychopaths of Martin McDonagh.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Los Angeles Department of City Planning (February 28, 2009), Historic - Cultural Monuments (HCM) Listing: City Declared Monuments, City of Los Angeles, retrieved 2000-03-02 
  2. ^ a b Rogers, J. David A Man, A Dam and A Disaster ; St. Francis Dam Disaster Revisited Nunis Jr., Doyce B. (Ed.) Historical Society of Southern California. 1995. ISBN 0-914421-13-1
  3. ^ http://www.scvhs.org/news/dispatch36-2.pdf
  4. ^ "Earth Guards Dam from Quakes." Popular Science, April 1934

External links[edit]