Muldoon

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Muldoon is an Irish family name. It is represented throughout the world where descendants of emigrants of people bearing that name have settled; e.g. USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and other countries.

It is an anglicization of the Irish Ó Maoldúin, "descended from Maoldúin," which in turn was a legendary first name. Also the name appears in other languages other than Irish Gaelic, Welsh/Irish 'Máel Dúin' This name means Hill-fort, the fort coming from the Duin part. This name Máel Dúin was first written down in the book of Lebor na hUidre or the book of Dun Cow. Máel Dúin is thought to be one of the first Irish explorers of the west coast of Scotland, he is thought to have established the first territory of Dál Riata west coast of Scotland. Also another Máel Dúin was one of the Kings from Mag Rath in Dál Riata, Western Scotland (See, List of the kings of Dál Riata), his name was Máel Dúin mac Conaill Died c. 689.

They were said to be of royal birth and styled themselves as the Kings of Lurg, which is now in County Fermanagh. County Fermanagh was part of Airgíalla. This federation of tribes, depending on timeframe, occupied portions of the provinces of Leinster and Ulster equating with parts of the modern-day counties of Louth, Monaghan, Armagh, Fermanagh, Tyrone and Londonderry. The high seat was Eamhain Mhacha (Navan Fort) in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. When the Muldoon's went out raiding and captured they had to be taken in golden chains and held for ransom.

According to The Surnames of Ireland by Edward MacLysaght, there are three distinct septs of Muldoon: Galway (around Uí Maine), Clare (whose names were generally Anglicised to Malone), and in County Fermanagh where the name is most common.

The secret of learning about the surname is easy the spellings are different but the anglicization is how it sounds in Gaelic. i.e. Duin, Dun, Dunn, Duinn, Donn, 'Doon'. But don't forget dialect in ancient Ireland was worse than now.

In Ireland the oldest spelling of the name is Donn (e.g. as in Domnall Donn (died 696) was king of Dál Riata (modern western Scotland)).

In Irish mythology, The Otherworld was also the land of the dead, who was ruled by a god named Donn, the "Dark One". He is said to be the oldest son of Mil, the leader of the Milesians, who fell foul of the goddess Eriu by not wanting to name Ireland after her. Donn was drowned in the sea off southwestern Ireland, but after death he became ruler of the dead and went to live in a sidh, a small island off the Beara Peninsula, that is still called Tech nDuinn ("House of Donn"). From here, it is said, the dead would begin their journey to the Otherworld.[1]

Although Ireland might seem the last and only ancestral home of the Muldoon's, being part of the doon's family we are. The name doon can be found around the world as far as China and India, this is thought to be from Proto-Indo European times, when a common language and culture spread out from Europe to India and China to the east and Britain and Europe to the west. The language of Gaelic and Indian still have common ancestry of root words.

In modern times, the oldest root word for doon was found in India(Dehradun) and China(Dunhuang),(Listen to it in Chinese the doon is still there)

Dunhuang is an Indo-European name doon. at the start as time moved forward Dunhuang was settled by the Tocharians(descendants of Indo-European) people, they laid the foundations of Dunhuang in the Tarim Basin (modern Xinjiang, China).

The Indian root is thought to mean 'Camp on the Hill' Camp is Doon. Basically 'sit on your bum and make a fire'.

Most of muldoon's may have a homeland in ireland, we are a world people. with one of the oldest names in the world. Doon.

The family logo is Pro Fide Et Patria, Latin for "For Faith And Country."

Notable Muldoons[edit]

Places[edit]

Other[edit]

Muldoon's Irish Pub - Newport Beach, CA. Award winning and Independent owned and operated since 1974. www.muldoonspub.com

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ MYTHOLOGY-The illustrated anthology of world myth and storytelling, Duncan Baird Publishers 2002, Celtic deities and Heroes, The Otherworld p.263, Life after Death