Mr. Krabs

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Mr. Krabs
SpongeBob SquarePants character
Mr. Krabs
First appearance"Help Wanted" (1999)
Created byStephen Hillenburg
Voiced byClancy Brown
Joe Whyte (SuperSponge, Operation Krabby Patty, Battle for Bikini Bottom)
Bob Joles (Truth or Square video game)
Information
SpeciesCrab
GenderMale
OccupationOwner and founder of the Krusty Krab
Relatives
  • Children: Pearl[1]
  • Parents: Betsy (mother)[2] and Victor Krabs (father)[3]
  • Grandfather: Redbeard[4]
  • Nephews: 3 unnamed triplets[5]
  • Ancestors: Prehistoric Krabs,[6] King Krabs, Pearl Krabs I, Western Krabs[7]
 
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Mr. Krabs
SpongeBob SquarePants character
Mr. Krabs
First appearance"Help Wanted" (1999)
Created byStephen Hillenburg
Voiced byClancy Brown
Joe Whyte (SuperSponge, Operation Krabby Patty, Battle for Bikini Bottom)
Bob Joles (Truth or Square video game)
Information
SpeciesCrab
GenderMale
OccupationOwner and founder of the Krusty Krab
Relatives
  • Children: Pearl[1]
  • Parents: Betsy (mother)[2] and Victor Krabs (father)[3]
  • Grandfather: Redbeard[4]
  • Nephews: 3 unnamed triplets[5]
  • Ancestors: Prehistoric Krabs,[6] King Krabs, Pearl Krabs I, Western Krabs[7]

Captain Eugene H. "Armor Abs" Krabs,[8] known as Mr. Krabs, is a fictional character in the American animated television series SpongeBob SquarePants. He is voiced by actor Clancy Brown, and first appeared on television in the series' pilot episode "Help Wanted" on May 1, 1999. Mr. Krabs was created and designed by marine biologist and animator Stephen Hillenburg.

Role in SpongeBob SquarePants[edit]

Mr. Krabs is the founder and greedy owner of the Krusty Krab restaurant, where SpongeBob works as a frycook,[9] and Squidward works as a cashier. The success of the restaurant is built in part on a lack of competition and in part on the success of the Krusty Krab's flagship sandwich, the Krabby Patty. The formula for the Krabby Patty is an extremely closely guarded trade secret.[8]

His rival, and former best friend, Plankton has a struggling restaurant called the Chum Bucket located across the street from the Krusty Krab.[10] A recurring gag throughout the series is Plankton's futile attempts to steal the Krabby Patty formula, under the assumption that it would eventually put the Krusty Krab out of business. To avoid this, Krabs goes to extreme lengths to prevent Plankton from obtaining the formula (going so far as to refuse to allow him to even buy a Krabby Patty legitimately, out of fear that Plankton might reverse-engineer the formula) or to prevent the Chum Bucket from having any business whatsoever, not even just one single customer (as seen in the episode Plankton's Regular).

Krabs seems to value money above all, even life itself (including his own), and he views the other characters in regard to how they affect his money.[11] He tolerates his two employees because of their low cost and positive impact on his finances, but he is quick to rebuke them, especially SpongeBob, if they engage in behavior that drives away customers or costs him money. Although he is rather slimy and cheap, Krabs has his good side. He and SpongeBob have a bit of a father/son relationship - Krabs often scolds SpongeBob if he gets in trouble, but at times gives him fatherly advice; and SpongeBob often looks up to Krabs for advice.

Krabs has an occasionally-seen "daughter," a sperm whale named Pearl. Pearl is a stereotypical teenage girl, extremely socially conscious and embarrassed of her father's miserly ways.

Merchandise[edit]

Mr. Krabs has been featured in various merchandise such as Lego, video games, and plush toys. In 2006, Ty Inc.'s Beanie Babies introduced a plush toy based on the character.[12][13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Writers: Steve Fonti, Chris Mitchell, Mr. Lawrence (September 4, 1999). "Squeaky Boots". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 1. Episode 8b.
  2. ^ Writers: Walt Dohrn, Paul Tibbitt, Merriwether Williams (September 21, 2001). "Sailor Mouth". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 2. Episode 38a.
  3. ^ Writers: Kent Osborne, Paul Tibbitt (July 12, 2002). "My Pretty Seahorse". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 3. Episode 42b.
  4. ^ Writers: Casey Alexander, Zeus Cervas, Dani Michaeli (February 18, 2009). "Grandpappy the Pirate". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 6.
  5. ^ Writers: Luke Brookshier, Nate Cash, Eric Shaw (November 23, 2007). "Stanley S. SquarePants". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 5. Episode 100b.
  6. ^ Writers: Paul Tibbitt, Kent Osborne (March 5, 2004). "Ugh". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 3. Episode 54.
  7. ^ Writers: Luke Brookshier, Tom King, Steven Banks, Richard Pursel (April 11, 2008). "Pest of the West". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 5. Episode 96.
  8. ^ a b Writers: Mike Bell, Paul Tibbitt (May 6, 2005). "Shell of a Man". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 4. Episode 61b.
  9. ^ Brown, Arthur (2008). Everything I Need to Know, I Learned from Cartoons!. USA: Arthur Brown. p. 85. ISBN 1435732480. 
  10. ^ Writers: Aaron Springer, Richard Pursel (March 19, 2009). "Komputer Overload". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 6. Episode 118b.
  11. ^ Writers: Luke Brookshier, Tom King, Dani Michaeli (July 31, 2007). "Money Talks". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 5. Episode 88a.
  12. ^ "Ty Beanie Babies Mr. Krabs - Spongebob Squarepants". Amanzon.com. Retrieved May 2, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Mr. Krabs". Ty Inc. Retrieved May 2, 2013. 

External links[edit]