Moussa Ibrahim

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Moussa Ibrahim
موسى إبراهيم
Born(1974-12-07) 7 December 1974 (age 37)
Sirte
ResidenceTripoli
NationalityLibyan
Alma materUniversity of Exeter
School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Royal Holloway, University of London
OccupationMedia specialist, political spokesman
OrganizationLibyan Arab Jamahiriya
Known forLibyan civil war
ReligionIslam
 
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Moussa Ibrahim
موسى إبراهيم
Born(1974-12-07) 7 December 1974 (age 37)
Sirte
ResidenceTripoli
NationalityLibyan
Alma materUniversity of Exeter
School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Royal Holloway, University of London
OccupationMedia specialist, political spokesman
OrganizationLibyan Arab Jamahiriya
Known forLibyan civil war
ReligionIslam

Moussa Ibrahim (Arabic: موسى إبراهيم‎ ; romanized also as Mussa and Musa) is a Libyan political figure, serving as Libyan Minister of Information and the official spokesman for Muammar Gaddafi from March 2011 until the fall of the Gaddafi government half a year later. He came to general international attention during the Libyan civil war.

Contents

Biography

Ibrahim was born in 1974 into Gaddafi's Qadhadhfa tribe. He has a German wife and a young son, and studied politics at the University of Exeter in the early 2000s. He worked on a PhD in media arts at Royal Holloway, University of London, completing his final exam in May 2010, although he has not formally received his doctorate as supervisors are awaiting a small number of required amendments to his thesis. One of Ibrahim's lecturers at the University of Exeter, Dr. Larbi Sadiki, described him as an engaging, friendly but serious student—"a nice guy but with a short fuse".[1]

He told Sky News: "I lived in London for 15 years. I know every street in London. I know how decent the British people are."[2]

On 19 August 2011, his brother was allegedly killed by an "Apache helicopter" in Zawiya.[3]

During the Battle of Tripoli, he called for a ceasefire and blamed NATO and the West for the situation, and said that the conflicting parties should sit down and negotiate, although he also said that thousands of professional soldiers were ready to defend Tripoli against rebel forces staging an uprising within the capital, as well those advancing towards the city from Zawiya.[4]

It was incorrectly reported on 29 September 2011 that Ibrahim had been captured near Sirte by NTC fighters.[5] No independent confirmation was forthcoming, and the report was denied by a pro-Gaddafi TV channel. Later that day a spokesman for the Misrata military council, Adel Ibrahim, told AFP "We cannot confirm he was arrested", and two days later an NTC commander admitted they had not captured him.[6] On 20 October 2011, Reuters reported that Ibrahim had been captured near Sirte, according to a Libyan transitional forces commander;[7] however, this was again proven to be untrue. On 22 October 2011, he was again reportedly captured for a third time, along with Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, near Bani Walid.[8] This however is also untrue, as Saif was not captured until 19 November near the town of Ubari. On 20 January, 2012 it was reported that Ibrahim had been captured in Asbi'a, Libya.[9] However, the following day these claims were denied by officials in Tripoli.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Kelly, Jon (2 April 2011). "Moussa Ibrahim: How Libya's voice was shaped in Britain". BBC News Magazine. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12918246. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  2. ^ Lisa, Holland (22 March 2011). "Full Interview With Moussa Ibrahim". Sky News. http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/video/Video-Full-Interview-With-Moussa-Ibrahim/Video/201103415957856. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Brother of Libya's information minister reported killed in NATO strike". CNN. 19 August 2011. http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/08/18/libya.war/. 
  4. ^ "Libya conflict: Rebels push towards Tripoli". BBC News. 21 August 2011. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14606749. 
  5. ^ "Gaddafi's spokesman arrested near Sirte: TV". Xinhua. 29 September 2011. http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-09/29/c_131168143.htm. Retrieved 29 September 2011. 
  6. ^ Nikolas, Katerina (1 October 2011). "NTC commander admits did not capture Moussa Ibrahim". Digital Journal. http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/312204. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
  7. ^ "Gaddafi spokesman Moussa Ibrahim captured --NTC". Reuters Africa. Reuters. 20 October 2011. http://af.reuters.com/article/energyOilNews/idAFL5E7LK3CW20111020. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  8. ^ Nikolas, Katerina (23 October 2011). "Libya's NTC claim Saif al-Islam Gaddafi captured alive, uninjured". Digital Journal. http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/313227. 
  9. ^ http://news.sky.com/home/world-news/article/16153453
  10. ^ The Independent (London). http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/inspectors-uncover-gaddafis-secret-stash-of-chemical-weapons-6292670.html. 

External links