Mount Shinn

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Mount Shinn
Mount Shinn is located in Antarctica
Mount Shinn
Mount Shinn
Location in Antarctica
Elevation4,661 m (15,292 ft)[1]
Prominence961 m (3,153 ft)[1]
Listing
Location
LocationAntarctica
RangeSentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains
Coordinates78°27′49″S 85°43′29″W / 78.46361°S 85.72472°W / -78.46361; -85.72472Coordinates: 78°27′49″S 85°43′29″W / 78.46361°S 85.72472°W / -78.46361; -85.72472[1]
Climbing
First ascent25 November 2008 by
Christian Stangl[2][3]
 
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Mount Shinn
Mount Shinn is located in Antarctica
Mount Shinn
Mount Shinn
Location in Antarctica
Elevation4,661 m (15,292 ft)[1]
Prominence961 m (3,153 ft)[1]
Listing
Location
LocationAntarctica
RangeSentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains
Coordinates78°27′49″S 85°43′29″W / 78.46361°S 85.72472°W / -78.46361; -85.72472Coordinates: 78°27′49″S 85°43′29″W / 78.46361°S 85.72472°W / -78.46361; -85.72472[1]
Climbing
First ascent25 November 2008 by
Christian Stangl[2][3]
Location of Sentinel Range in Western Antarctica.
Sentinel Range map.

Mount Shinn is a mountain 4,661 meters in elevation, standing 6 km (4 miles) southeast of Mount Tyree in the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It surmounts Ramorino Glacier to the north, upper Crosswell Glacier to the northeast, Goodge Col to the southeast, and Branscomb Glacier to the south-southwest.

The peak was discovered on IGY reconnaissance flights in January 1958, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander Conrad S. (Gus) Shinn, U.S. Navy, a pilot on some of these flights. Shinn was pilot of the Navy R4D aircraft carrying Admiral Dufek which, on October 31, 1956, made the first plane landing at the geographic South Pole. It had been thought to be over 4800m high, but was re-measured in 2001 by Damien Gildea and Rodrigo Fica of the Omega Foundation, using a Trimble 5700 GPS receiver and the Australian government's AUSPOS processing system.

Maps[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c ? (1 November 2004). "Mount Shinn, Antarctica". peakbagger.com. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  2. ^ Stangl, Christian. "Mt. Shinn". skyrunning.at. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Jurgalski, Eberhard (28 August 2013). "Seven 2nd/Seven 3rd". 8000ers.com. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Mount Shinn" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).